Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

ROMAN GLASS SPRINKLER FLASK

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, ALLAIRE COLLECTION OF GLASS, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 21, 2014

SPRINKLER FLASK (our first)

This pale olive green bottle has a funnel-shaped mouth and two handles of a darker green color. The faint diagonal pattern on the body was achieved by first blowing the glass into an optic mold. The bubble was then removed, twisted and further inflated. The small hole created by the neck constriction in this vessel permits only a drop or two of liquid to pass through at a time. This also prevents the costly contents from evaporating. The glass is still fairly clear and transparent as it was originally intended when created. Flask is intact. It was found in Israel.

D: 3rd to 4th Century AD

H: 7.5 cm Rim: 5.2 cm

1r-Roman glass sprinkler-flask

01R Roman Glass Sprinkler Flask 3nd-4th Century

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2 Responses

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  1. theo zandbergen said, on March 25, 2014 at 7:20 am

    John and Carole,

    Looks like you ar on a buying spree. The flask in this mail is a really nice one. Always wonder how they got the material in the flask. That must have been a tedious type of work. Don’t know if the archeaologists ever unearthed a pipet which could have been used to fill the flasks with the neck restrictions. As we all know with filling flasks it should also be possible for the air in the flask to escape.

    Here, at least at this moment, no further additions. Almost wrote addictions.

    kind regards from home to home, theo

    • Allaire Collection of Glass said, on March 26, 2014 at 11:34 am

      Thanks for your comment. I think these sprinkler flasks were filled by pouring the desired liquid into the funnel-shaped mouth and a thin possibly hollow reed or straw was used to break the surface tension and allow air to escape. I don’t remember ever seeing a sprinkler flask that didn’t have a funnel-shaped mouth.


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