Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

Example 21

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 21

Dimension: H = 15,3 cm.; H stem = ~ 7 cm.; ø bowl = 9 cm.; ø foot = 7,8 cm.; weight = 54,5 gram

Origin & Date: Venice last Q 16th century.

Material: so called “cristallo” glass

Stem Type: This is a typical example of the highly appreciated stems “a jambe” meaning like a leg. Others call this a cigar type stem, but the more appropriate term is “a jambe”. See Baumgartner “Venise et Façon de Venise, verres renaissance du Musée des Arts Decoratives Paris. follow this link a look a like to #120

Description: The bell shaped bowl is set via a merese directly under the bowl to the hollow stem “a jambe”, being directly set via a merese to the almost flat foot. A simple and most elegant stem architecture.

Remark:  This glass like # 93 and # 117 is sometimes called a “flying glass”, as the person taking the glass is fooled by the light weight. The glass “flies” as it were as the senses are set for a much higher weight and subsequently the muscles geared to that higher weight have a funny experience from the shear light weight of the glass.

Example 20

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 20

A Façon de Venise Glass # 123 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: H = 13,1 cm.; H stem = 3,5 cm.; ø bowl = 6,8 cm.; ø foot = 7,1 cm.; weight = 66 gram.

Origin: Almost certain the Netherlands ~ 1650

Material: “cristallo”.

Stem definition: This glass is typical for this period with the gadrooned bottom part of the round funnel bowl, and the distinctive stem architecture. The bowl is set via a short cylindrical solid section on the first hollow basal knop, followed by a hollow cylindrical section commencing to the second hollow basal knop set on a small disc connecting to the spreading folded foot. The sober stem architecture has some resemblance with glass # 28 or Example 12

Example 19

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 19

 

Venetian of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: H = 13,5 cm.; H stem = 6,3 cm.; ø bowl = 11 cm.; ø foot 7,8 cm.; weight = 75,9 gram.

Origin: Venice or Tuscany late 16th early 17th century.

Material: “cristallo”

Stem definition: This is another example of a stem “a tige” or like a twig.

Description: The exceptional component to this glass is the merese between the trumpet shaped bowl and the stem enhancing the elegance of this glass. More common is that the bowl is directly set to the hollow “a tige” stem. The hollow stem is set via a merese to the rather flat foot.  The use of a merese is more usual for the “a jambe” stems, setting the bowls to the “a jambe” stems.

Example 18

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 18

Venetian Glass # 117 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: H = 16,7 cm.; Stem H = 6,8 cm.; ø bowl = 9,5 cm.; ø foot = 8 cm.; weight = 54,6 gram.

Origin & Date: Venice or Tuscany late 16th early 17th century.

Stem Type: This is a so called kuttrolf stem.

Description: This is a so called kuttrolf stem. The bowl is set via a merese on the double helix hollow twisted stem, set to the flat foot again with a small merese. The so called kuttrolf technique is already known from Roman times.

Example 17

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 17

A Façon de Venise Glass # 95  of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions:H = 15.1 cm.; H stem = 6,2 cm.; ø bowl = 7 cm.; ø foot = 7,8 cm.; weight =61,7 gram.

Origin: Almost certain the Netherlands last Q 16th to mid 17th century.

Material: “cristallo”

Stem definition: This is a so called “snake” or “serpent” stem.
The funnel shaped bowl is set via a merese directly under the bowl thru a short full glass narrowed
down section to the top part of the hollow twisted ribbed stem. The first part, running to about half
stem height, comes down straight and forms from there the typical looped bottom part, then
progressing into “snaked” windings going all the way back to the top part of the stem. The “snake”
stem is set with a merese to the somewhat conical foot. The stem is accentuated by a short blue
colored element. A quite exuberant stem architecture for that period.
Ref: Tait-The Golden Age of Venetian Glass, Hugh Tait, London 1979 pg. 89 nr. 142, Pijzel-Dommisse Glinsterend
Glas pg. 82/83 nr. 115))

Example 16

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 16 and  #93 Venetian of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: H = 19,4 cm.; Stem H = 9 cm. ø bowl = 8,1 cm.; ø foot = 8,4 cm.; weight = 76,7 gram.

Origin & Date: Venice 4th Q 16th century

Stem Type: This is a so called stem “a tige” or like a twig.

Description: The bowl is directly set to the hollow stem which is directly set to the rather flat foot.

Example: 15

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example: 15

LIEGE FAÇON DE VENISE GLASS #55 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

 Dimensions: ­ 18,6 cm.; ­ stem 10,4 cm.; ø bowl 8,2 cm.; ø foot 8 cm.; weight 108 gram

 Origin & Date: Southern Netherlands, Liege, mid-17th century.

Stem Definition: a compound repeating pattern of a small hollow knop attached larger hollow knop separated by a merese with two pinched (blue) ornaments

Description: The stem of this Liege Façon de Venise glass has a restrained exuberance characteristic for that time for the Southern Netherlands but, is still quite vivid from the two pinched blue ornaments. The spiralled trumpet optically blown bowl is set via a merese to the first small hollow knop directly followed by the largest somewhat flattened hollow knop to which the blue ornaments are attached. Followed by a merese connecting to a concave formed transition piece set to another hollow knop followed by a merese connecting to a short solid section which connects to the conical foot.

Material: soda glass.

Example 14

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 14

Façon de Venise glass #40 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: ­ glass 14,5 cm.; ­ stem 6,5 cm.; ø bowl 9 cm.; ø foot 8,3 cm.; weight 80 grams.

Origin & Date: the Netherlands mid 17th century.

Stem definition: predecessor to Silesian

Description: This Façon de Venise glass has a stem architecture which basically is a predecessor to the later so called Silesian stem. The funnel shaped bowl, with a quite solid base, is set via two graduated mereses to the kind of inverted baluster lobbed hollow knop set via another merese to a short concave formed hollow section followed by another merese set to the wide slightly conical folded foot. This type of stem formation is sometimes characterised as typical for the Netherlands (Lanmon)

Parallels: Laméris, Venetiaans & Façon de Venise glas 1500 – 1700, pg. 96, nr.77, – Henkes, Glas zonder glans, pg. 263 nr. 174,
– Ritsema, Glass in the Rijksmuseum Vol.II, pg. 85, nr. 65 (engraved glass)

Provenance: – Old Dutch Collection,- Remco v. Leeuwen antiques, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

Example: 13

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example: 13

FAÇON DE VENISE WINE GLASS #36 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: H: 15,1 cm.; ø cuppa 7,7, cm.; ø foot 9,6 cm.; weight 153,6 gram

Origen & Date: Southern Netherlands around 1650

Stem Definition: a hollow and flattened dumb-bell knops between two thin merese or a double hollow flattened spherical knops between two merese with a wide folded flat foot

For additional information follow this link

Example 12

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 4, 2011

Example 12

Venetian Glass # 28 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

H: 12,6 cm glass; H: stem 3,8 cm.; ø bowl 6,5 cm.; ø foot 6,5 cm; weight 54,4 gram

D:1600 and either Venice or Altare

Description: The bowl of this glass is directly set on a hollow knop followed by a smaller hollow knop set via a merese to the rather flat foot with folded rim.

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