Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

ACETABULUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 21, 2012

ACETABULUM of Joop van der Groen

Roman Glass Acetabulum

Roman Glass Acetabulum

Roman Empire │ Probably 1st century – possibly 2nd century AD
Size: ↑ 7,0 cm; Ø rim 10,8 cm. │ Weight: 141 gram

Technique: Partly blown into an open mould, the flange pressed and folded, the foot tooled
Classification: Isings (1957) form 69 a
Description: A hemispherical cup of tranparent bluish-green glass. Rim with rounded lip, at bottom of the rim a folded tubular flange. Wall curves in at top, making narrow ledge at inside. Base disk-shaped formed by tooling, slightly concave on undersite with rest of pontil.
Condition: Intact with some iridescence and encrustation
Remarks: In publications this form has often been named “patella”. This is wrong. Patella is the name of this form in terra sigillata. The correct name of this form in glass is “acetabulum”. This has been traced back to the Latin word “acetum” which means vinegar.
The glass of this acetabulum is relatively thick. The latest reference has the same measures but weights only 72 gram.
Provenance: 2008 P.E. Cuperus, Laren (NL).
From 1991 until 2008 in the private collection of Edward Elliot Elson (USA).
From 1960 until 1991 in the private collection of Alfred Wolkenberg (USA).
Published: Antiquities (Christie’s New York, 2008), Sale nr. 2007, 04-06-2008
The Alfred Wolkenberg Collection of Ancient Glass and related antiquities (Christie’s London), Auction, 09-07-1991.
Ancient Glass from the Alfred Wolkenberg collection – a loan exhibition (M. Milcovich, 1964).
Exhibited: “Ancient Glass from the Alfred Wolkenberg Collection, a loan exhibition” in Brookes Memorial Art Gallery in Memphis (USA), October 1964 – January 1965.
Reference: Römisches Buntglas in Köln (Fremersdorf, 1958), Tafel 47, no. 42.184; Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass – Vol. II (D. Whitehouse, 2001), no. 116; Ancient Glass in the Hermitage collection (N. Kunina, 1997), no. 285 and 286; Les Verres Antiques du Musée du Louvre II (V. Arveiller-Dulong & M-D. Nenna, 2005), nr. 5; Roman and Early Byzantine Glass – a Private Collection (H. van Rossum, 2014), no. HVR 012; The Allaire collection, Small Roman Glass Cup 61R.

POINTED UNGUENTARIUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 21, 2012

POINTED UNGUENTARIUM of Joop van der Groen

282. inv.nr. 10-03 (2-TH2)

Roman Empire │ 1st century AD, probably 1st half
Size: ↑ 12,6 cm; Ø max. 2,5 cm; Ø rim 1,9 cm. │ Weight: 74 gram

Technique: Free blown. Tooled.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 9
Descripton: Transparent purple coloured glass. Tall neck, tapering gently inward to the top. Funnel-shaped mouth with a rounded rim. The neck swells slightly to form a small body before tapering to form a point.
Condition: Intact
Remarks: This form has been found in the western and in the eastern part of the Empire. The size can differ very much, from 7 cm up to 22 cm.
The basic colour of Roman glass is bluish-green. This has been caused because sand (the main element for making raw glass) has been polluted by iron oxide. By addition of some percents manganese oxide in the raw glass the colour changed into purple / aubergine.
Provenance: 2001 – 2009 P. Cuperus , Laren (NL), no. PEC045
2001 Jean-David Cahn AC, Basel (SW)
Published: Glass from the Roman Empire (P. Cuperus, 2009)
Reference: Solid Liquid (Fortune Fine Arts Ltd New York, 1999), nos. 85, 86 and 87; The Fascination of Ancient Glass – Dolf Schut Collection (M. Newby & D. Schut, 1999), no. 54;
Vom Luxuxobjekt zum Gebrauchsgefäss – Vorrömische und römische Gläser (Honroth, 2007), nos. 69 and 70; Fascinating Fragility – A Private Collection of Ancient Glass (Bijnsdorp, 2010), no. NFB 022; Roman and Early Byzantine Glass – a Private Collection (van Rossum, 2014), no. HVR 114

FAÇON de VENISE WINE GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 20, 2012

FAÇON de VENISE WINE GLASS of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Façon de Venise glass, the Netherlands, last Q 16th cent.
H: 15.1 cm.; ø 7 cm., weight 61,7 gram.

Description: This wine glass made from “cristallo” has a rounded funnel cuppa set on a merese which connects to the hollow a-symmetrical, three dimensional and spiralled – “snaked” – stem connecting by a small merese to the slightly conical foot. The stem is decorated with a turquoise snake like ornament from which an extremely small part is missing.

Origin: most probably the Netherlands.

Parallels:
– Pijzel-Dommisse and Eliëns, Glinsterend glas, 1500 jaar Europese glaskunst, pag. 82,
pict. 115, as an example for the snake like structure of the stem,
– Baumgartner, 2005, pag. 196,
– Tait, Venezianisches Glas, Taschenb¸pag. 188 afb. 142, again for the “snake” form,
– Glass in the Rijksmuseum Vol.I pag. 47 afb. 52, pag. 54 afb. 65. This glass is shown upside down
as the foot is missing and a silver dice holder has been mounted on the remaining lower stem part.
The dimensions of this glass are almost identical to the one in our collection.
– Amsterdams Historisch Museum, Willet Holthuysen, pag. 121 afb. 75,
with the same stem as our glass,
– Laméris Frides and Kitty, Venetiaans en Façon de Venise glas 1500-1700
exhibition 1991, page. 121 pict.. 117,. Is almost identical but has a folded rim foot, and has an
engraving. Our glass “escaped” the hands of the engraver.
– Henkes, Glas zonder glans, page.220 nr. 48.1, this for the construction of the stem. He states that the
stem of 48.1 is a build up of a twisted glass bar. This in contradiction with our glass having a twisted
hollow stem.
– Falkenhof Museum, Rheine, Glas funde aus einem unterirdischen kanalsystem
Band 1, stamfragment nr. 100 pag. 249, large picture on pag. 252-253. This catalogue is most
interesting as it holds recent discoveries.

Provenance:
– With Frides Laméris,
– In the owner’s collection since 2009

INDENTED CUP (CREATION OF MOTHER NATURE)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 17, 2012

INDENTED CUP (CREATION OF MOTHER NATURE) of Hans van Rossum

INDENTED ROMAN CUP

INDENTED ROMAN CUP

Second part of 1st century AD | Roman Empire, probably north Italy

Size: ↑7.4 cm | ø 7.2 cm | Weight 42 g Technique: Free blown, tooled Classification: Isings form 32 (early variant) | Scatozza Höricht form 20 Description: Cup with convex profile, twelve vertical, oval indentations. Rim folded outward,base plain, slightly concave; no pontil mark. Condition: Perfect condition with incredible silvery and golden iridescence Remarks: This cup of very thin glass, especially in combination with the absence of a pontil mark will justify a dating during the second part of 1st century AD. This specific form is rare. Provenance: Judith Pierce, Tolland (CT) USA, 2014 Reference: Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass – Vol. I, D. Whitehouse no. 171 Roman Glass in Cyprus, O. Vessberg p. 122, pl. III:27 Ancient Glass in National Museums Scotland, C.S. Lightfoot no. 185

TWO-HANDLED BEAKER OR SKYPHOS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 17, 2012

TWO-HANDLED BEAKER OR SKYPHOS of A Private Dutch Collection of Roman Glass

two-handled beaker or scyphos

two-handled beaker or skyphos

1st Century A.D., (Isings form 39), Rhineland (Germany)

Size:H = 6.8 cm, D = 12.5 cm
Condition: Intact and in excellent condition
Description: Greenish free-blown footed beaker or ‘skyphos’ with straight walls, everted rim and hollow glass thread. Two handles in same color.
Exhibited: Museum Honig Breethuis (NL) ’Fascinating luxury of Antiquity’ 12 November 2011– 30 January 2012 , exp no. 34
Provenance: Private collection Cologne (Germany)

TRANSLUCENT HIGH RIBBED BOWL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 16, 2012

TRANSLUCENT HIGH RIBBED BOWL of The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

Late 1st Century B.C. -Mid 1st Century A.D. (Isings form 3B), Eastern Mediterranean

Size: H = 6.3 cm D= 14.0 cm
Description:Vertical rim. The thick-walled green bowl is decorated with 21 pronounced ribs, almost vertically downwards arranged . Two parallel lines, incised using a grinding wheel, inside the lower part of the bowl. Flat bottom. Intact and in excellent condition.
Provenance: Dutch collection (acquired in the1960s)
Ref. The Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Nr.14.40.806
Remarks: Recent experiments by Mark Taylor & David Hill indicate how bowls like this one possibly were made: applying the ribs with a metal rod on a disc, re-heating several times and placing the glass on a mold to model the disc into the form.

For more details about the manufacturing technique, see also http://www.romanglassmakers.co.uk/ribbed.htm

CYLINDRICAL ROMAN BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 13, 2012

CYLINDRICAL BOTTLE of Joop van der Groen

Cylindrical Roman Bottle

Cylindrical Roman Bottle

Roman Empire, Eastern Mediterranean │ Late 1st century – 2nd century AD
Size: ↑ 17,0 cm; Ø max. 12,4 cm; Ø rim 7,5 cm. │ Weight: 437 gram

Technique: Mold-blown in an open mold. Neck and mouth free blown. Handle applied.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 51 a. Fleming (1999) type a for the handle.
Description: Transparent bluish-green glass. Cylindrical body with short cylindrical neck, rim folded outward, down, upward, and outward to form a collar. Shoulder slopes, with rounded edge. Wall tapers slightly and curves in the bottom; base plain, slightly concave on undersite; no pontil. Strap handle with twelve sharp ribs, applied into edge, drawn up and in, and attached to neck.
Condition: Intact with strong iridescence and with some encrustation
Remarks: A handle like this has been named “celery-handle”.
Through the interaction of liquid and pollutions in the ground glass is weathering and can get all colours of the rainbow.
Provenance: before 2005 in the private collection of Simon Spierer (1926 – 2005), Genève; he was an art dealer and patron of the arts.
Published: Romeins glas uit particulier bezit (J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum, 2011).
Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), “Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit”,
29 April – 28 August 2011, exp. no. 206
Reference: Ancient Glass of Asia Minor – The Yüksel Erimtan Collection (C. Lightfoot & M. Arslan, 1992), no. 18; Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum – The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts (Y. Israeli, 2003), no. 323; Ancient Glass in National Museums Scotland (C. Lightfoot, 2007), no. 180; Hôtel des Ventes d’Enghien, Enghien-les-Bains (Fr), Auction 22-05-2011, no. 8.

TALL CYLINDRICAL ROMAN BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 13, 2012

TALL CYLINDRICAL BOTTLE of Joop van der Groen

Tall Cylindrical Roman Glass  Bottle

Tall Cylindrical Roman Glass Bottle

Roman Empire, almost certainly Asia Minor │ Late 1st century – 2nd century AD
Size: ↑ 22,2 cm; Ø max. 8,3 cm; Ø rim 4,4 cm. │ Weight: 175 gram

Technique: Mold-blown in an open mold. Neck and mouth free blown. Handle applied.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 51 b. Fleming (1999) type c for the handle.
Description: Transparent light blue glass. Cylindrical body with cylindrical neck, rim folded outward, down, upward, and inward to form a collar. Shoulder slopes, with rounded edge. Wall tapers slightly and curves in the bottom; base plain, slightly concave on undersite; no pontil. Strap handle with four ribs, applied into edge, drawn up and in, and attached immediately below rim, with excess glass pulled down neck.
Condition: Intact with some iridescence
Remarks: Originally the bottle had much encrustation inside. Because of this you could see that the botlle laid in situ almost horizontally. Restauratieatelier Restaura in Haelen (NL) has professionally cleaned the bottle in 2008.
Provenance: 2007 Jan van Bergen, ’s-Hertogenbosch (NL). Formerly part of a Dutch private collection.
Published: Romeins glas uit particulier bezit (J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum, 2011).
Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), “Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit”,
29 April – 28 August 2011, exp. no. 208
Reference: Römische Kleinkunst – Sammlung Karl Löffler (P. La Baume, 1976), no. 99; Ancient Glass in the Hermitage collection (N. Kunina, 1997), no. 235; Ancient Glass in National Museums Scotland (C. Lightfoot, 2007), no. 181; Roman and Early Byzantine Glass – a Private Collection (H. van Rossum, 2014), no. 156.

ROMAN GLASS ARYBALLOS WITH CHAIN & STOPPER

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 8, 2012

ARYBALLOS WITH CHAIN AND STOPPER of Hans van Rossum

Second half of 1st century AD | Eastern Mediterranean, probably Asia Minor Size↑7.3 cm | (body) ø 7.0 cm | Weight 188 g

Technique: Free blown, handles and bronze acc. applied

Classification: See Isings 1957 form 61 | Morin-Jean type handles θ, Sorokina 1987 fig. 1-8 (rim), type C6 (handles)

Description: Transparent bluish-green glass aryballos, globular body, round base and short neck; triangle-shaped mouth, rim folded outward, downward, upward and inward. Two glass handles applied on the shoulder, drawn up and down forming a circular hole; handles attached to the shoulder again by using a hand-held tool; bronze looped carrying handle in form of inverted U; the handle attached to two bronze rings which pass through the two glass handles. The bronze rings made by bending length of wire into circle held in place by twisting the overlapping ends. A bronze chain attached to one of the rings and connected to a bronze stopper. No pontil mark. Exceedingly rare.

Condition: Perfect condition, small part of rim restored

Remarks: Greek and Roman athletes carried aryballoi filled with oil to clean their bodies after the exercises by applying the oil together with fine sand on their skin to absorb the dirt and then scraping it with a strigil.

Provenance: Collection C. A. Hessing, Laren (NL) 1998, formed in the 1990s, collection number 74
Private collection Axel Weber Cologne, acquired in the 1970s Private collection Rhineland
Published: Romeins Glas uit particulier bezit, J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum 2011, p. 96 De Oude Flesch, no. 124 p. 14 & no. 121 p. 22 Newspaper De Telegraaf, 27 May 2011, p. T13 Vormen uit Vuur no. 220 (2013), p. 17 Glass Circle News, Issue 133, Vol. 36 no. 3, 2013.

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 171.
29 April – 28 August 2011. Museum Simon van Gijn Dordrecht (NL), February 2004. Allard Pierson Museum A’dam (NL), de Kunst van het Vuur, exp. no. 44. 17 May – 16 September 2001.

Reference: Les Verres Antiques du Musée du Louvre II, V. Arveiller – Dulong & M.D. Nenna no. 639.
Gallo-Romeins Museum at Tongeren (B) for an identical example, not described in the book of M. Vanderhoeven 1962. A Collection of Ancient Glass 500 BC – 500 AD, P.L.W. Arts no. 46. Verres Antiques et de l’Islam, Ancienne Collection de Monsieur D(emeulenaere) no. 223.

ROMAN GLASS GUTTROLF SPRINKLER

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 8, 2012

PATTERN-BLOWN SPRINKLER GUTTROLF  of  Hans van Rossum

Roman Glass Guttrolf Sprinkler Bottle

Roman Glass Guttrolf Sprinkler Bottle

Roman Glass Guttrolf Sprinkler Drawing

Roman Glass Guttrolf drawing from Dr. F. Fremersdorf and no. 1041 of the Corning Museum!

 

3rd century AD | Eastern Mediterranean, probably Syria, Size↑16.0 cm | ø 6.3 cm (base) | Weight 110 g

Technique: Body pattern-blown, neck and rim free blown, handles applied, tooled

Description: Transparent yellowish green glass, blown into a mold. This oddity was blown like a standard small bottle but instead of one opening this guttrolf has five small openings, one (in reality two very small openings in the form of a pair of in the opposite direction fixed triangles ►◄) at centre and four at every edge, separated by diaphragms. The marks of the tool which was used are still very good visible. This bottle is also a sprinkler by having a constriction and inner diaphragm at base of the neck and that is not only rare but in combination with the form of a guttrolf also strange. The upper part of the body, including the tubes covered with mold-blown pattern of ribs is rare too. Two handles applied on the shoulder, drawn up and attached to the edge of the rim forming a thumb-rest. The base is slightly indented with no pontil mark.

Condition: Intact, some slightly incrustation and iridescence  ‘

Remarks: Vessels of this type, which are made in the Roman era as well as the medieval and later periods, were first discussed at length by Rademacher (1928-29) and Fremersdorf (1931). A form that is well-known among Venetian, façon de Venise, and German (Spessart) glasses of the 14th-15th centuries and later.’ (Whitehouse) Guttrolfs blown into a mold to be covered with a pattern of ribs are rare. One almost similar mold-blown Guttrolf belongs to the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass (inv. no. 63.1.17) of which Whitehouse suggests in Vol. III (2003) of the Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass it may be a 19th century imitation. There are many Roman glass Guttrolfs, ‘…however none of these objects has molded and pinched decoration, and this observation, together with the almost pristine condition of 1041 (the Corning guttrolf), arouses the suspicion that the object may be an example of 19th-century period of Historismus.’ (Whitehouse) During this period companies like Ludwig Felmer – Glas & Porzellanwaaren – Handlung in Mainz and the Rheinische Glashütten – Actien – Gesellschaft in Ehrenfeld bei Köln are imitating not only Venetian and Old German but also Roman glass forms. Hans van Rossum refutes these arguments of Whitehouse in his Master-thesus (2008) entitled: ‘Roman Glass forms and their Nachleben, Creation, Imitation and Falscification’. This refuting is based on the fact of the existence of an identical Guttrolf which was part of the collection of Dr. F. Fremersdorf (‘Der Römische Guttrolf’ in Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts 1931, p. 133) and the existence of another similar Guttrolf which is described here (part of the Van Rossums collection) and which is more or less identical with the Corning’s example. Both examples made as a sprinkler, pinched and blown into a mold because the surface is covered with a pattern of cross-hatched (Fremersdorf) and diagonal (Van Rossum) formed ribs. Both guttrolfs are undeniably authentic. Hans supposes, and without any doubt, the Corning example is identical to the guttrolf that was part of the collection of Dr. F. Fremersdorf. The resemblance between them is so striking that no misunderstanding can exist. In that case, it is plausible that Wilhelm Henrich must have acquired this guttrolf from Dr. F. Fremersdorf after 1931, and the Corning Museum of Glass received the vessel from him in 1963, as a gift. Note: In reaction to my (small) research Dr. Whitehouse († 2013) promised to annotate his copy of ‘Volume III’ with a note to the effect that Fremersdorf’s Guttrolf is ‘similar’ (possibly identical)’ to inventory number 63.1.7. (email- 28 July 2012)

Provenance: Sasson Ancient Art Ltd., Jerusalem 2004 Collection Mayor Teddy Kollek, Jerusalem Published: Glass Circle News Issue 133, Vol. 36 no. 3, 2013. Romeins Glas uit particulier bezit, J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum 2011, p. 135 Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 25, 11 April 2001 lot 177 Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 271 29 April – 28 August 2011 Reference: Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass,Vol. III, D. Whitehouse no. 1041 Eretz Museum Tel-Aviv, inv. no. MH43558 Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum, The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts, Y. Israeli no. 388 Glas uit de Oudheid, B. Jansen no. 17 ‘Der Römische Guttrolf’ in Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, F. Fremersdorf p. 131 – 152. Sotheby’s London, auction 20 Nov.1987 lot 65

%d bloggers like this: