Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

FOOTED FLASK WITH PINCERED TRAILS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 28, 2012

FOOTED FLASK WITH PINCERED TRAILS of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

LATE ROMAN FOOTED FLASK WITH PINCERED TRAILS

LATE ROMAN FOOTED FLASK WITH PINCERED TRAILS

4th – 5th century AD. Syro Palestinian.
H = 19.8 cm. Dmax = 5.2 cm. Drim = 4.4 cm. Dbase = 5.4 cm. W = 176 gr.

Classification: Barag 1970: Type 10.3.

Condition: Intact. Minute loss of trail around neck. Weathering and iridescence on both exterior and interior.

Technique: Free blown and tooled. Applied handles and trails.

Description: Transparent yellowish-green glass. Translucent aquamarine handles and trails.
Funnel mouth with rounded rim. Cylindrical neck slightly constricted at junction with piriform body. Pushed-in tubular base ring with pontil mark. Transparent green trail wound seven times around the neck upwards from the bottom until under the rim. Two pincered trails attached to opposite sides of the body, pulled up from the lower to the upper body, pulled out and attached to lower neck, pulled out again and attached halfway up the neck to form two double-tiered loop handles (B-form).

Remarks: Flasks with pincered trailing along the body were very popular in the Syro-Palestinian area in the late Roman and early Byzantine times. They appear in two forms: with and without foot. The foot mostly in the form of a pushed-in base ring. A second distinction relates to the form of the loop handles: (a) two single loop handles; (b) two double-tiered loop handles; (c) two triple-tiered loop handles, form (a) being the most common, form (b) more exceptional and form (c) rare.

Published: Millon Maison de Ventes aux Enchères, 22 June 2012, No 836.

References:

Stern 2001, Ernesto Wolf Collection, No.170.
Israeli 2003, Israel Museum, No. 347,
Kunina 1997, Hermitage Museum, Nos. 404-405.
Auth 1976, Newark Museum, No.165.
Kunz 1981, Kunstmuseum Luzern, No. 375.
Arveiller-Dulong, Louvre Museum, No. 1064.
Dilly 1997, Musée de Picardie, p. 19.

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