Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 28, 2016

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR of Hans van Rossum

potje met deksel

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR

4th – 5th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean

Size↑6.2 cm | ø 6.4 cm | Weight 66 g

Technique: Free blown, thread applied, tooled

Description: Transparent bluish-green glass, cylindrical body with hollow cut-out flange below polished and unworked mouth. Body decorated with zigzag of bluish-green glass
coil. Tubular pushed-in base ring. Pontil scar.

Condition: Intact

Provenance: Auction München 2014

Remarks: A shape with a cut-out flange, in combination with the zigzag decoration is rare.
The lid is authentic but originally not belonging to this jar.

Reference: No parallels could be found

ROMAN CUP CALLED ACETABULUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 26, 2016

Acetabulum

Romans often drank a mixture of vinegar and water and had a special container for this called an acetabulum. This is from the Latin acetum (vinegar) and abulum the suffix denoting a small vessel.   Today the word is used only as a medical term to describe the cup-like shape in your hip that the thigh bone sits in. Usually made of pottery, some in the first Century, as in this example were made of glass and often found in Italian graves.  Below are three examples.

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ACETABULUM

Roman Glass Acetabulum

ROMAN GLASS CUP (ACETABULUM)

61R Small cup (acetabulum)  1st Century

61R Small cup (acetabulum) 1st Century

SPANISH FINS and FINIALS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 23, 2016

Sometimes the decoration on a piece of glass is what makes it outstanding.  Spanish glassmakers of the 17th to 18th Century often took this to extremes with their fins and finials. The following examples illustrating this point are from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Allaire Collection.

ROMAN GLASS JAR WITH ZIG-ZAG RIM

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 21, 2016

Roman Glass Zig-Zag Jar

This is a Roman jar with zig-zag trailing between the top of  the rim to the  shoulder of the body.  It was probably made in the eastern Mediterranean area.

Third-Fourth Century A.D.

H: 7 cm

40R Roman Zig -Zag Jar

COPTIC GLASS BOWL MADE IN EGYPT

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 20, 2016

COPTIC BOWL FROM THE ROMAN PERIOD

39R Coptic Bowl

39R COPTIC BOWL FROM THE ROMAN PERIOD

Fourth Century A.D.

D: 11 cm. H: 9 cm.

This Coptic bowl from the Roman period was made in Egypt.  This link is to another Egyptian glass bowl from this area. Also see two Museum collections of glass from Karanis, The Brooklyn Museum and Kelsey Museum.

 

 

 

Coptic glass bowl 4th C.

Late Roman Glass Jar with Chain Decoration

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 19, 2016

Late Roman Glass Jar with Chain Decoration

 This late Roman glass jar is light green in color and free-blown.  The piriform body is concave on the underside and has a wide flaring mouth with a rounded rim with applied dark blue trailing wound spirally up the rim.  There are three trails wound around the body and tooled at intervals to form a pattern of bisected ovals called chain trailing. The trailing on this object is similar to a Juglet from the Hans van Rossum collection and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Accession Number: 37.128.6.

H: 11.1 cm 4th C. AD October 2002

51R Jar 4th C

51R Late Roman Jar with Chain Decoration 4th C

AMPHORISKOS WITH “FLOATING HANDLES”

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 18, 2016

ROMAN GLASS AMPHORISKOS WITH “FLOATING HANDLES” of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

nfb-211

First half of 1st century AD. Syro-Palestinian, probably Sidonian.

H= 8.6 cm. D max= 4.1 cm. D rim= 2.0 cm. Weight 28 gr.

Condition:Intact. Minor weathering and incrustation.

Technique: Body blown into a two-part mold of two vertical sections (MCT VIII A). Neck free blown, rim tooled. Handles applied.

Description: Transparent, clear pale bluish green glass for body and handles. Ovoid body with flat base. Concave neck with curved transition to shoulder. Rim folded out, up, in and down. Two coil handles applied to underside of rim , drawn down to shoulder (not attached), cut off at tip and pinched to form a small disc. One  handle positioned on the mold seam, the other one adjacent to it. One continuous mold seam around body and base. Vessel shaped like a miniatureamphora encased in a wicker basket, with a branch of eight pairs of two laurel leaves alternating with laurel berries around the middle of the basket. On one side the leaves point to the right, on the other side to the left.

Remarks: Stern describes ten types of mold blown glass bottles like this one, that can be attributed to the workshop of the “Floating Handles”, most probably active in Sidon. Roman workshops usually made handles by applying a bit of glass to the shoulder or body of a vessel and then pulling it upward toward the neck or rim where it was attached. In the workshop of the “Floating Handles”, the glass blowers made handles the other way around. The hot bit was applied to (or near) the rim and then pulled downward toward the shoulder or body. With a tool, perhaps a type of shears or pincers, they pinched it to form a small disk at the lower tip of the handle. This pinching cooled the glass too much to let it attach to the wall of the vessel. The lower end of the handle in fact “floats”. The decoration on this bottle is based on the actual practice of protecting glass transport vessels by wrapping them in wickerwork, as can be seen on a few ancient glass vessels which still retain their wicker baskets.

Provenance: Charles Ede Antiquities, London, 2008. Collection Mr. F. of Surrey (1909-1984).

Published: Groen 2011, Romeins Glas uit Particulier Bezit, p. 69. Bonhams 26 April 2007, No. 17.

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas uit Particulier bezit, April 29 till August 28 2011, No. 250

Reference: Kunina 1997, Hermitage Museum, No. 129. Saldern 1974, Oppenländer Collection, No. 431. Stern 1995, Toledo Museum, No. 59. Christie’s 5/6 March 1985, Kofler-Truniger Collection, No. 112. Israeli 2011, Shlomo Moussaieff Collection, p. 84 Christie’s 5/6 March 1985, Kofler-Truniger Collection, No. 112.

Hexagonal Roman Bottle

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 17, 2016

Hexagonal Roman Bottle

The olive-green color of this hexagonal bottle and its diminutive size make it an unusual example.  Probably made in the Second or Third Century, it differs from the later Byzantine types by its thinly blown sides and precise mold markings on the bottom.  The base of the vessel is molded in relief with six spokes radiating from a central boss, each termination with a raised dot.  It has been suggested that this type may have been made in the Western Provinces

H: 9 cm

Second to Third Century

33R Hexagonal Bottle bottom view (1)

33R Hexagonal Roman Bottle bottom view

33R Hexagonal Bottle

33R Hexagonal Roman Bottle

ROMAN GLASS TRULLA

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 16, 2016

ROMAN GLASS TRULLA of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

roman-glass-trulla-nfb-167

 Late 1st – early 2nd century AD. Western Empire.

 H= 6.1 cm. D rim= 11.1 cm. D base= 5.7 cm. L= 19.4 cm.  Weight 113 gr.

 

Classification: Isings 1957: Form 75b.

Condition:Intact. Some weathering and iridescence.

Technique: Free blown. Handle and foot applied.

Description: Transparent pale green glass. Pan with deep cup and handle. Rim outfolded and rounded. Vertical wall slightly bulging just below rim and curving in sharply at bottom. Flat base with pointed kick and no pontil mark. Foot applied, outsplayed and with traces of tooling. Long flattened handle, made of drawn-out trail, attached to lip, then pinched out, with pincer-marks on top and bottom and excess glass folded back on whole length of the underside to the rim. Handle very broad at attachment to rim, narrowing to the middle and broadening again at the end.

Remarks: The word “trulla” can be defined as “ladle” or “dipper”. They were widely used inthe Roman Empire, serving as ritual objects in religious ceremonies for libations or for drinking or pouring purposes and  even in bathing activities.

Published: Gorny & Mosch 17 June 2004, No. 211.

Reference: Whitehouse 1997, Corning Museum, No. 346. Hayes 1975, Ontario Museum, No. 148. Arveiller-Dulong 2005, Louvre Museum, No. 36. Massabò 2001, Aquileia Museum, No. 72. Saldern 1974, Oppenländer Collection, No. 557 (p. 241).

 

STRIKING SIMILARITIES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 14, 2016

The glass manufacturing industry of the past is not unlike that of today.  When a design is popular the maker has a good reason to create many of them, as well as being copied by other companies!  The following examples illustrate these similarities in form & decoration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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