Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

COLORLESS CARCHESIUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 31, 2017

COLORLESS CARCHESIUM of Joop van der Groen

COLOURLESS CARCHESIUM

COLORLESS CARCHESIUM

Roman Empire, Eastern Mediterranean │ 2nd – 3th century AD
Size: ↑ 9,9 cm; Ø foot 4,8 cm; Ø rim 9,4 cm. │ Weight: 72 gram

Technique: Free blown. Tooled.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 36 b.
Description: Transparent colorless glass with a number of small air bubbles. Body of waisted bell-shaped form. Side wall sharply curving back to slightly concave underside. Bottom pushed in to form a tubular base ring. Pontil mark. Thin glass thread around the body. Rounded rim.
Condition: Intact.
Remarks: Carchesia have been found throughout the whole Roman Empire. La Baume (1974) says: “Carchesia of glass have been blown according to examples in metal.” It is not certain that this form was called carchesium in the antiquity (Isings, 1957).
The basic color of Roman glass is bluish-green. This has been caused because sand (the main element for making raw glass) has been polluted by iron oxide. By addition of 0,2 to 1,5 percent antimony oxide the bluish/green raw glass changes into colorless glass. The use of silver or quartz sand also results in colorless glass.
Provenance: 2006 Frides Lameris Kunst en Antiekhandel vof, Amsterdam. Before 2006 in a private Dutch collection.
Published: Romeins glas uit particulier bezit (J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum, 2011).
Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), “Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit”,
29 April – 28 August 2011, exp. no. 48.
Reference: Glas der antiken Welt (P. La Baume, La 1974), no. D 8: Archéologie, Collections de deux Grands Amateurs (Binoche et Giquelllo, Paris), 30-05-2012, no. 159; Kunstwerke der Antike (Cahn Auktionen AG Basel), Auktion 7, 03-11-2012, no. 112; Ancient Coins & Antiquities, Archaeological Center Tel Aviv), Auction 54, 27-03-2013, no. 243.

DRINKING BEER WITH CLASS (GLASS)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 29, 2017
Beer is one of the oldest and most popular alcoholic beverages dating back to the 6th Millennium BC.   Beginning in the Middle East and Egypt in the earliest history its popularity spread throughout the world in later times.

The following pictures show examples from our collection to illustrate various styles of vessels for drinking beer.

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES OF VERY RARE FORMS & EXAMPLES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 24, 2017

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES OF VERY RARE FORMS & EXAMPLES

An explanation of what is considered a very rare form & example for this post.  The examples shown are objects which have only a very few parallels in Museums or in the literature.  The monetary value of these examples were not part of the criteria for choosing.

 

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

A Venetian toastmaster’s or deceptive glass with spiked gadroons

 

Hans van Rossum

SEALED ARYBALLOS

MELTED ROMAN GLASS PERFUME BOTTLE

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROMAN ASKOS

DOUBLE-BODIED JUGLET

SNAIL RHYTON

Roman glass snail rhyton

BOWL WITH DIAMOND-SHAPED MOTIFS

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The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

FOUR CORE-FORMED FISH SHAPED GLASS BEADS

ROMAN GLASS BOWL WITH FACET DECORATION

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

ROEMER WITH SPHERICAL PRUNTS

50E Roemer with Spherical Prunts C. 1650-1675 H 12cm

 

FACON de VENISE TRICK GOBLET

89E Facon de Venise trick glass C. 1650

Long Neck Roman Bottle with Iridescence

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 22, 2017

Long Neck Roman Bottle with Iridescence

46R Roman Bottle with a long neck

This spherical flask was blown from colorless glass. Around the body are several wheel-cut bands. The long tubular neck ends with a collared rim. The piece is intact and has a beautiful bluish green iridescence.

H: 19.7 cm

2nd -3rd Century AD

Ref: Loudmer, Kevorkian, 1985, Collection Monsieur D # 336

We invite you to comment on this post with remarks or questions about the glass.  Also, let us know if you are a glass collector or scholar. Pleas leave your e-mail so we can get back to you.  You can use this link, “leave a comment”.

ROMAN AUBERGINE COIL PITCHER

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 21, 2017

Aubergine Coil Pitcher with Light Green Handle

44R Aubergine Coil Pitcher with Light Handle

This aubergine glass pitcher has an ovoid blown body with an applied trail decoration and handle of light green glass.  The excellent state of preservation makes this elegant jug an extraordinary work of the late Roman glass industry.

H: 14.5 cm
4th Century AD

Newark # 121

 

We invite you to comment on this post with remarks or questions about the glass.  Also, let us know if you are a glass collector or scholar. Pleas leave your e-mail so we can get back to you.  You can use this link, “leave a comment”.


Facon de Venise Spanish Arbarello Jar with Cover

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Spanish Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 20, 2017

Facon de Venise Spanish Arbarello Jar with Lid

69E Arbarello with Lid

Remarks: This small lidded vessel of greenish transparent glass is decorated with cage-like white threads.  It may possibly have served as a pharmaceutical jar.  Finding  a vessel of this type with a lid is uncommon.

Height: 6 inches

Date: 17th C.

Reference: E. Heinemeyer, Glas (Kunstmuseum Dusseldorf, 1966) p. 88 #259

Published: Form and Light: 400 years of European Glass (Michael Ward, Inc. 1985)

Provenance: Ex Collection: Baumgartner, Basel

 

We invite you to comment on this post with remarks or questions about the glass.  Also, let us know if you are a glass collector or scholar. Pleas leave your e-mail so we can get back to you.  You can use this link, “leave a comment”.

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF RIBBED BOWLS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 17, 2017

Glass bowls with ribbing have been made since Hellenistic times from the 1st century BC into the first few decades of the 1st century AD.  Reportedly used as drinking vessels they apparently had wide spread use and popularity.  The examples preserved from this period are quite varied in size, color and even process of manufacture.  The earlier bowls were probably not cast,  but may have been formed from thick round discs. The ribs were formed hot with a pincer tool and then the disc was slumped into a bowl shape. The process is described in this link Ribbed Bowls and their Manufacture by Mark Taylor and David Hill.  Later ribbed bowls were formed on a blowpipe and ribs were formed with a pincer tool. The examples here show a wide variety of glass ribbed bowls from antiquity.

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF RIBBED BOWLS

 

Hans van Rossum

 

RIBBED BOWL

RIBBED BOWL

RIBBED BOWL

ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

 

 

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

 

TRANSLUCENT HIGH RIBBED BOWL

 

Translucent high ribbed bowl

 

TRANSLUCENT HIGH RIBBED BOWL(a variant on a ribbed bowl)

 

 

 –

 

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

HELLENISTIC RIBBED BOWL

RHODIAN CAST MONOCHROME BOWL (a variant on a ribbed bowl)

 

 –

David Giles

HELLENISTIC CAST, SLUMPED, CUT GLASS BOWL(a variant on a ribbed bowl)
 

 

 –

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

30R Ribbed bowl 1st Century BC

MONOCHROME RIBBED GLASS BOWL

67R Roman ribbed glass bowl 1BC-1AD

 

 

To see additional ribbed bowl on this site:  HELLENISTIC AND ROMAN GLASS RIBBED BOWLS

We invite you to comment on this post with remarks or questions about the glass.  Also, let us know if you are a glass collector or scholar and your e-mail so we can get back to you.  Please use this link, “leave a comment”.

 

ROMAN GLASS SKYPHOS

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 16, 2017

ROMAN GLASS SKYPHOS

Roman Glass Skyphos 27R

The classic shape of this skyphos, a two-handled drinking cup from the First Century, reflects the metal prototypes of the period.  The body, thinly blown, has straight sides, an out-turned rim and applied ring base.  The elaborate handles have finger rests at both top and bottom and were angled for ease in drinking.  The skyphos has been repaired.  It was found in Turkey.

H: 8 cm

Date: First Century A.D.

Constable Maxwell # 68

THREE ROMAN BALSAMARIA or UNGUENTARIA

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 15, 2017

THREE ROMAN BALSAMARIA or UNGUENTARIA of the The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

 

Mid first to early 2nd. century A.D. Isings form: 8/27

 

↑ 10.1/10.3/10.0 cm | Ø body: 2.25/2.39/2.49cm |

 

Ø Mouth : 2.05/2.3/2.5 cm | Weight: 2.2/2.6/2.0 g  |

Technique: Freely blown, two dark blue, one amber colored.

Description: Bottle, tubular body, two-thirds of total height. Rim everted, then folded up and in; neck cylindrical; long body that splays gradually, then curves into rounded base, traces of the pontil mark with all three examples.

Condition: Intact, complete, one repaired at the neck; extensively pitted, with remains of silver iridescence in pits.

Remarks: These so-called toilet-bottles carry many different names as: unguentarium, balsamarium, test tube, ampoule, tubular, file, ‘doigt de giant’ (giants finger), ‘ampoules lacrymatoires’(tear bottles) and more, but they were no tear-bottles, test-tubes, or giants fingers. In reality they origin from Augustian times on and last until the fourth century, being used as small containers to carry precious perfumes to the bathhouse and, alas, to the graveyard or the field where the combustion of the deceased took place, in order to drive away the smell of burning flesh, as many distorted or melted examples testify from several excavations ever since the 19th. century. * Link to a melted example in the collection of Hans van Rossum

 Reference:

Houben, 1839, pl XV.

Cochet, 1854, p57, gr.1, p 116.

Kisa, 1908,  vol 3, Formentafel A, no 3.

Morin-Jean, 1913, forme 20, 21, ampoule lacrymatoire en jaune ou blue vif.

Isings, 1957, form 27, variation of form 8. Test tube unguentarium.

Calvi, 1968,  gruppo E.γ Balsemari; Tubolari tipo E α. (cat. 42).

Goethert-Polaschek, 1977, Form 66a.

Sennequier, 1985, Fiole Tubulaire, 149, pp 99-100. ‘Doigt de Geant’.

Höricht, 1986, Forma: 47a, 47d, pp 61-62, nos 184-200, Tav. XXXV, 788.

Whitehouse, 2001, CMG, vol I, p 137, Toilet Bottle no: 224, 226.

 

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF ROMAN BALSAMARIA

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 13, 2017
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