Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

GLASS THROUGH THE AGES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 13, 2018

“GLASS THROUGH THE AGES”

Presented by

The Dordts Patrician House – Museum at the Meuse river

Located at banks of the old Meuse river and at the harbor area of the historical intercity of Dordrecht you will find the Dorts Patrician House active link, a beautiful monumental house which gives you a great impression of life at the end of the 18th century. Have a look at the fine details, paintings and drawings in this authentic 18th century house. The new show ‘GLASS THROUGH THE AGES“, will run from April 12, 2018 through October 7, 2018.  Now, as a visitor to the Patrician House, you can see this beautiful exhibition. The glassware that is shown comes from the collections of Hans van Rossum, Nico Bijnsdorp, Aad v.d. Born, Joop van der Groen, Martin, Annelies  and Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen starts with very early examples from the 6th century BC. These are followed by over 120 Roman glass objects, dated 1st – 5th century AD.  Also on display are silver coins showing the Roman emperors being paired with glass objects in use at their respective reigns.  A nice example is the coin depicting emperor Otto, who was bald as a coot, wearing a wig.  A unique display.In another display cabinet drinking glasses are shown from the 1st century AD.to the year 1923, including a Merovingian cup.

For additional information about the collections of these five contributors to the show click on their names and you will be taken to their page on this site.

Annelies

Hans van Rossum

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Joop van der Groen

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

 

For visitors there will be a very special offer to buy the book: Roman Glass borrowed from Private Collections with many high-class illustrations and the complete story of the production and used techniques by the Roman glass-workers. Visitors of the museum don’t pay € 19,95 but only € 7,50.

Below are examples of what you can see at the exhibition

(Click below to enlarge photos)

 

 

 

HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 11, 2018

30R Date: Late First Century B.C. to Mid First Century A.D.  Hight: 13 cm

 

Remarks:This is a earlier Roman ribbed bowl was probably not made by direct cast and slumping method.  It may have been formed from a thick round disk. The ribs were formed hot with a pincer tool and then the disk was slumped into a bowl shape. The process is described in this link Ribbed Bowls and their Manufacture by Mark Taylor and David Hill. It is a class of bowls from the from the Eastern Mediterranean area with short, close-set ribs concentrated around the middle of the body.  For the most part, such bowls are naturally colored, either bluish-green or light green, or intentionally decolorized. Small percentage occurs in cobalt-blue or other colors. The size of the bowls and thickness of the ribs vary.

Ref: Sheppard #9, Toledo #236

Gallo-Roman Glass Hofheim Cup

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 10, 2018

29R Hofheim Roman Glass Cup  Mid First Century H: 5cm

Remarks: This is a blown convex Roman cup with wheel-cut lines and fine horizontal scratches. The scratches may indicate that the exterior may have been lathe-polished.   Cups like this are called Hofheim cups after a Rhineland military site where over thirty examples were found.  They have also been found in Britain.

 

Swirled Roman Glass Sprinkler Flask

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 9, 2018

28R Swirled Roman Glass Sprinkler Flask 4th century

28r  Fourth century  H: 7.5 cm

A series of mold-blown sprinkler flasks having a closed off dropper mouth were created during the Third and Fourth Centuries. Such vessels exhibit a similarity in shape with a few variations in design. The swirled ribbing of this piece is typical, but the treatment of the mouth is not.  Here the more common funnel-mouth is replaced with a tooled collar, suggesting a later date of manufacture into the Fourth Century.

 

Ref: Antonaras, Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum, Anastassios C. Antonaras, 2012 #111

ROMAN GLASS FLASK

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 8, 2018

Roman Glass Flask of Ludovic Deswelle

Date: 3rd-4th C  Size: 11,5 cm / 9 cm

Description: Blown glass flask of green color,  with a beautiful golden iridescence from natural weathering.  Globular body and wide rimmed neck. One spiral trail just under the rim at the top.

Parallels: unknown

References: From the Pierre René Bauquis collection, Origine Auction (29th october 2016).

FOUR CORE-FORMED GLASS VESSELS FROM 4th to 5th century BC

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 5, 2018

Four Core-Formed Glass 4th to 5th century BC of David Giles

Remark: Methods of making glass objects came about shortly after glass was discovered.  The first glass objects manufactured were not vessels but amulets or pendant and beads (see example Pendant nfb 270). Vessels were made later by core winding (all of rest of the examples) from 1500 to 1200 BC. in the Mesopotamia, Egypt and Eastern Mediterranean region. Production declined between 1200 and 800 but revived from 800 to the 1st century BC. After the introduction of glass blowing by the Syrians 100 BC, the method ceased to be used with few exceptions (see Miniature core form jug).  A good scholarly book on this type of glass is Early Ancient Glass, David Grose, Toledo Museum, 1989.

This link is to a short video from Corning Museum of Glass on these methods. (http://www.cmog.org/video/core-formed-vase)

Core and Rod-Formed Early Glass Objects

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 2, 2018

Core and Rod-Formed Glass Objects 6th BC.  To 4th AD.

From the Allaire collection Core-Formed Alabastron 26R active link

Methods of making glass objects came about shortly after glass was discovered.  The first glass objects manufactured were not vessels but amulets or pendant and beads (see example Pendant nfb 270). Vessels were made later by core winding (all of rest of the examples) from 1500 to 1200 BC. in the Mesopotamia, Egypt and Eastern Mediterranean region. Production declined between 1200 and 800 but revived from 800 to the 1st century BC. After the introduction of glass blowing by the Syrians 100 BC, the method ceased to be used with few exceptions (see Miniature core form jug).  A good scholarly book on this type of glass is Early Ancient Glass, David Grose, Toledo Museum, 1989.

This link is to a short video from Corning Museum of Glass on these methods. (http://www.cmog.org/video/core-formed-vase)

From the collection of David Giles active link

FIVE CORE-FORMED GLASS VESSELS

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass active link

FOUR CORE-FORMED FISH SHAPED GLASS BEADS active link

CARTHAGINIAN HEAD PENDANT

Below

From the collection of Nico F. Bijnsdorp active link

CORE-FORMED OINOCHOE active link

 

 ROD-FORMED HEAD PENDANT active link

ROD-FORMED KOHL TUBE WITH STOPPER active link

From the collection of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen active link

CORE FORMED ALABASTRON active link

CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE active link

 

SMALL CAN BE BEAUTIFUL, A CORE FORM JUG active link

 

 

 

Aubergine Two-Handled Roman Bottle

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 1, 2018

25R Aubergine Two-Handled Roman Bottle Date:First Century  H: 8 cm

Remark: It is from the earlier glass core-form and pottery shapes prior to the First Century that this vessel takes its shape.  The ancient aryballos was a popular shape and copied widely after glass blowing was invented.  This example was beautifully executed using auberegine glass with delicate blue handles and was used as a container for perfume.

Ref: Oppenlander #541, Royal Ontario #122

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