Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

JULY 4, 1776, INDEPENDENCE DAY

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 4, 2018

On July 4, 1776, the thirteen colonies claimed their independence from England, an event which eventually led to the formation of the United States.  What was the most common type of glass bottle in the colonies at that time ?

 

American Chestnut Bottle

Free blown American chestnut bottles were made in great quantities by most of the early glass shops from about 1750 to 1850. They were mostly made of the natural color of glass which is different shades green to brown. The name chestnut is based on the bulbous and flattened shape. The bottles typically are 4 to 9 inches however some are as small as 2 inches and large as demijohns and carboys. Similar chestnut flasks were made in Germany in the 18th-19th century. Ref: Kechum p. 5,11, McKearin Plate 225, Spillman II #45

The three examples from the Allaire collections are:

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8"

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8″

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8″

This is a dark olive green American chestnut bottle with pushed-up base.  Plain applied lip.

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

This free blown American chestnut bottle is olive green with pushed-up base and plain applied lip.

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

This light olive green American chestnut bottle has a high kick and plain applied lip.

One Response

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  1. Paul said, on July 25, 2018 at 6:22 pm

    Nice website,


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