Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

PERGAMON AND THE HELLENISTIC KINGDOMS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on April 23, 2019

This exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art was from April 18 to July 17, 2016. Pergamon, was a rich and powerful ancient Greek city in Aeolis. It is located 26 kilometers from the modern coastline of the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the river Caicus and northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey. This exhibition of 264 diverse artworks was mainly wonderful marble Greek and Roman sculpture.  The Hellenistic glass though small in number was spectacular.

Some marble and bronze Greek and Roman sculpture

Exhibition Overview of Show

The conquests of Alexander the Great transformed the ancient world, making trade and cultural exchange possible across great distances. Alexander’s retinue of court artists and extensive artistic patronage provided a model for his successors, the Hellenistic kings, who came to rule over much of his empire. For the first time in the United States, a major international loan exhibition will focus on the astonishing wealth, outstanding artistry, and technical achievements of the Hellenistic period—the three centuries between Alexander’s death, in 323 B.C., and the establishment of the Roman Empire, in the first century B.C.

The exhibition represents a historic collaboration between The Met and the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, whose celebrated sculptures will comprise approximately one-third of the works on view. Numerous prominent museums in Greece, the Republic of Italy, other European countries, Morocco, Tunisia, and the United States will also be represented, often through objects that have never before left their museum collections.

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