Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

ROMAN GLASS JUGLET WITH SHOULDER-RIDGE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 31, 2019

JUGLET WITH SHOULDER-RIDGE of  Hans van Rossum

roman-glass-juglet-with-shoulder-ridge

Second part 1st century AD | Eastern Mediterranean, probably Crete or Italy Size↑9.3 cm | ø 8.5 cm | Weight 94 g

Technique: Early free blown glass, handle applied; tooled

Classification: Isings 1957 form 53 (variant) | Morin-Jean 1913 type 47 (variant), type handle α¹

Description: Transparent bluish-green glass. The squat body with sloping wall, a pad-base formed by lower sections of wall. Tall tubular neck with flaring mouth, rim folded inward. On the shoulder of the body a thick hollow ridge encircling the body. Broad angular three-ribbed strap handle applied on the shoulder and attached to the upper part of  the neck, top-end folded up to form a pad against neck. The concave base is formed by a narrowing in the lower part of the body, no pontil mark

Condition: Intact with some incrustation; a crack in the lower part of the body, consolidated by Restaura, Haelen (NL) 2010

Remarks: A narrow neck like this one, in combination with the manner in which the handle is attached to the neck is a characteristic for the early Roman glass jugs, imitating pottery jugs. This specific type of jug, which has a cut-out fold on the shoulder, is not very numerous. In combination with the specific form of the body this example is even rare. It has a bottle neck like the preceding jugs and a cut-out base.   (Isings 1957) The typical cut-out form of the base is also a characteristic for products made during the first century AD.

Provenance: Cardo Center – Old City of Jerusalem, 1995

Reference: Archaeological Museum in Rethimnon at Crete, Vetri antichi del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Adria, S. Bonomi, no. 318Antike Gläser, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Kassel, M. Boosen no. 53 Collection Castello Viscontea, Locarno Das naturfarbene sogenannte blaugrüne glas in Köln, F. Fremersdorf  Tafel 53 Les Verres Antiques du Musée du Louvre II, V. Arveiller-Dulong & M.D. Nenna nos. 46-49 Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Accession Number 74.51.143 from the Cesnola Collection La fragilitat en el temps. El vidre a l’antiquitat, T.C. Rossell no. 81

What happened to the Cinzano Glass collection ?

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 28, 2019

 
What happened to the Cinzano  Glass collection ?

Article by David Giles

 In 1971 Count Alberto Marone Cinzano, of the family that created the famous Cinzano Vermouth, decided to start collecting fine examples of ancient and antique glass. The collection was published first in 1974 and again in 1978 under the title The Cinzano Glass Collection, edited by Peter Lazarus.

In recent times the collection appeared to have gone from public view and I enquired of many glass people what had happened to it. It was suggested that it had been sold and dispersed and in fact in one recent London glass auction catalogue it suggested that a glass had come from that collection. After much searching I was delighted to discover that the collection was still completely intact and with additional glasses added after the 1974/78 publications. What however had happened was that the Marone family sold the Vermouth business in 1992 to an international drinks company which was absorbed in 1997  into the large British company Diageo and the collection of glass was included.  So now the collection is known as the Diageo Glass Collection. Diageo actually sold the Cinzano Vermouth label to Campari in 1999 but kept the glass collection. It was published again in 2005 and edited by Rosa Barovier Mentasti under the title Glass Collection Della Diageo a Santa Vittoria d’Alba. The catalogue is now out of print but can still be obtained on second hand books sites.

When the collection was published in 1974/78 there were 125 pieces in the collection but after that the Marone family added more pieces and in the 2015 publication there are 144 pieces featured. The oldest piece in the collection is a wonderful 5th century BC Obsidian lobed bowl.  There are twenty ancient vessels of Roman and Frankish origin and two Islamic glasses. Twenty Venetian glasses. Lots of glasses from Holland and Germany and also from England. Each one is illustrated with colour plate and full description in Italian and English.

The collection is now kept at Diageo meeting centre in Villa Storica a Santa Vittoria d’Alba Italy which is between Turin and Genoa, It can be visited by prior arrangement if you Email deborah.fuhrmann@diageo.com.

Readers might also like to look at www.diageomeetingcenter-sv.it/

Enter the site and click on Le Cantine and they will see how cleverly the glass is displayed in cut-out old wine barrels. This collection might be an idea for a future visit of the Glass Circle.

Attached are photos of 8 examples from the collection.  This article will be in the next Glass Circle News letter.

ROMAN GLOBULAR TRANSPARENT JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 25, 2019

Globular Transparent Jug of The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

Roman globular jug

Roman globular jug

Roman globular jug

Roman globular jug

1st-2nd Century A.D., Roman Empire
Size H= 16.0 cm D rim= 5.0 cm D max = 10.0 cm
Classification Isings form 52a

Description: Intact free blown light-olive green transparent jug or bottle. The rim folded downward, upward and outward. Short cylindrical neck with slight constriction at the bottom end and wide near-globular body and slightly pushed-in base. Four-ribbed strap handle applied to shoulder drawn up and attached to the neck below rim at right angles
Provenance: Paul E. Cuperus collection NL (PEC047)
Exhibited: Thermen Museum Heerlen (NL), ‘Roman Glass from Private collections’, 29 April-28 August 2011, exp.no.67
Published: Bonhams, Fine Antiquities July 1996, no.267, Bonhams, Fine Antiquities December 1996, no.87, Ref. Bonomi no.317; Zampieri no.246

WHEEL-ABRADED ROMAN GLASS JAR

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 22, 2019

WHEEL-ABRADED ROMAN GLASS JAR of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

WHEEL-ABRADED ROMAN GLASS JAR

Close-up of WHEEL-ABRADED ROMAN GLASS JAR

Date & Origin: 4th century AD. Eastern Mediterranean.

Size:H= 11.5 cm. D max= 11.8 cm. D rim= 9.5 cm. D base= 4.3 cm. Weight 224 gr.

Classification: Isings 1957: Form 94.

Condition: Intact. Crack across base. Iridescence and weathering, especially in abraded area.

Technique  Free blown. Wheel-abraded. Foot applied.

Description: Transparent pale greenish-blue glass. Jar with squat globular body on applied coil-foot. Short flaring neck to mouth with thickened rim, rounded in flame. Below the rim a thick applied coil wound around neck. Body decorated with wheel-abraded arcades, consisting of eight fluted pillars, each on a broad base and topped by broad capitals, connected by close zigzag arches. Abraded circles with central dot between the pillars.

Remarks: This bulbous jar is reminiscent of Isings form 94, which she dates to the 2nd century AD, but the rare wheel abraded decoration is more common on 4th century AD glasses like the engraved jar in the Royal Ontario museum, Hayes 1975, No. 590. The decoration however, may also have been applied in the 4th century on a jar from the 2nd century. It has been suggested that the abraded decoration had been filled with white paint. XRF-analyses has proven that the white of the arcades is pure (iridescent) glass and not paint.

Published: Antiek Glas 2001, video film Allard Pierson Museum. , Beek 2001, Antiek Glas, de kunst van het vuur, No. 13. ,Christies 3 July 1996, No. 316. ,Sheppard & Cooper Ltd, 1994, No. 53.

Exhibited:  Allard Pierson Museum, Amsterdam, Antiek Glas, de kunst van het vuur, 17 May – 16 September 2001, No. 131. , Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, 29 April – 28 August 2011, No. 239.

References: Hayes 1975, Ontario Museum, No. 590, Sotheby’s London 4/5 June 1979, The Constable Maxwell Collection, No. 266, (for the decoration).

ROMAN GLASS SPRINKLER FLASK WITH ZIGZAG DECORATION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 16, 2019

SPRINKLER FLASK WITH RARE ZIGZAG DECORATION of Hans van Rossum

 

 

Date: 3rd – 4th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean Size:↑8.6 cm | ø  6.5 cm | Weight 75 g

Technique: Free blown, tooled; glass coil applied

Condition: Perfect condition, colorful iridescence

Description: Transparent manganese glass for the squat pear-shaped body; cylindrical neck with constriction and inner diaphragm at base to control the pouring and evaporation of the costly liquid within. On the lower part of the shoulder a heavy coil ring of pale opaque green glass is encircling the body, started up with a drop and ending in a thin thread, completing the circle.

The zigzag glass coil decoration started with a drop on the bottom, making a circle by passing the drop, drawn up to make seven zigzag resolutions. The top of the zigzag melted with the encircled coil. Cylindrical neck, flaring mouth; rim folded inward. Indented base, small rest of pontil mark.

Remarks: The way in which this sprinkler flask has been decorated is exceedingly rare or probably                      unique for this type of a sprinkler. Only one, more and less, similar way of decorating could be found, part of a small jug dated in the 4th century AD.

Provenance: Ex collection Mr. an Mrs. Nobili Paris,  collection number 25

Published: Histoire du Verre l’Antiquité, F. Slitine p. 84

Reference: Antiquities and Islamic Works of Art – Glass from the Ray Winfield Smith Collection, Sotheby Parke Bernet Inc, New York, 2 May 1975 lot no. 243 for a small jug with a similar decoration.

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF BLUE ROMAN GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 13, 2019

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF BLUE ROMAN GLASS

 

Hans van Rossum

ROMAN BLUE RIBBED BOWL (zarte Rippenschale)

8H ROMAN BLUE RIBBED BOWL

MINIATURE AMPHORA

SQUAT CARINATED ROMAN BOTTLE

ROMAN SQUAT CARINATED BLUE BOTTLE

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROMAN OPAQUE BLUE GLASS JUG

 

HEXAGONAL BOTTLE WITH FLORAL MOTIFS

ROMAN MEDALLION WITH THE HEAD OF MEDUSA

Medusa Roman Glass Medallion NFB 301

David Giles

 

OPAQUE BLUE ROMAN BUD VASE

OPAQUE BLUE ROMAN GLASS BUD VASE

 

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

BLUE JUGLET WITH CYMBALS

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AMPHORISKOS

roman-amphoriskos

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Blue Roman Glass Unguentarum

Blue Roman Glass Unguentarum1

 CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE

CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

ROYAL BLUE RIBBED UNGUENTARIUM

Royal blue ribbed unguentarium Roman bottle

HEAD-SHAPED BOTTLE

HEAD-SHAPED BOTTLE

 

SIDONIAN FLASK WITH OPAQUE HANDLES

SIDONIAN FLASK WITH OPAQUE HANDLES

 

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

Joop van der Groen

PEAR-SHAPED ROMAN GLASS UNGUENTARIUM

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

BLUE ROMAN BOTTLE

17R Roman blue bottle 1st Century

Roman Glass Marbled Pear Shaped Bottle

54R Roman marbled blue bottle 1st Century 5.6 cm

Core-Formed Alabastron

26R Core formed alabastron 6th-4th BC

DUTCH JENEVER GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 10, 2019

Dutch Jenever Glass of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dutch Jenever Glass

Dutch Jenever Glass

Origin: the Netherlands around 1750.

Dimensions: H 17,0 cm.; ø cuppa 7,1 cm.; ø foot 7,4 cm.; weight 130,1 gram.

  Description: This elegant jenever glass is quite rare regarding shape, construction and decoration. Jenever, in the old days written as genever, is the typical strong alcoholic Dutch drink not being the same as gin. The trumpet like cup and stem are made from one take of glass. The MSAT (Multiple Spiral Air Twist) in the stem starts at the bottom of the cup and continues almost to the foot of the glass being the second part of the construction of this glass.  The unique feature to this glass is the incorporation of two graduated bulbous knops.  The foot is slightly conical and the pontil is quite present in sight and feeling. The stem is made out of solid glass.

Material: soda glass.

Parallels: Up to now very few parallels to this glass have been found which strengthens the statement of Frides Laméris when we bought this glass saying that he had rarely seen glasses with this architecture. The closest parallel regarding the shape of the stem is in Bickerton, English Drinking glasses 1675 – 1825 pg. 15 top row second glass from the left. However, the shape of the cuppa of that glass is different from our glass. An engraved parallel was auctioned at Bonhams 17-12-2008, The James Hall Collection, Sale number 16672 lot nr. 120. A rather good parallel was found with O.N. Wilkinson, Manufacture, Style, Uses, pict. 82, having a folded foot and two so called swelling knops iso. the more bulbous knops and the not folded foot of our glass.

Provenance: With Frides Laméris, Amsterdam, In owners collection since 2001

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 7, 2019

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES of  Hans van Rossum

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES

1st – 2nd century AD | Eastern Mediterranean.

Size↑14.8 cm | Weight 26 g | L
Size↑15.0 cm | Weight 14 g | R

Technique: Free blown, tooled

Classification: Barag 1970 type XXI 13

Description: One bottle of transparent bluish-green glass and the other of almost colorless glass, each with two bulges at the base, rim turned outward and then folded inward. Long cylindrical neck. Base slightly indented. No pontil scar.

Condition: Intact with iridescence and some slightly incrustation and weathering.

Provenance: Collection Albert Loncke, Overpelt (B) 1995

Reference: Ancient and Islamic Glass in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, A. Oliver Jr. no. 108
Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum, The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts, Y. Israeli no. 247, Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, N. Kunina no. 366, Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass – Vol. I, D. Whitehouse no. 250, Kunst der Antike, Galerie Günter Puhze Katalog 23 no. 147

FAÇON de VENISE WINE GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 4, 2019

FAÇON de VENISE WINE GLASS of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Façon de Venise glass, the Netherlands, last Q 16th cent.
H: 15.1 cm.; ø 7 cm., weight 61,7 gram.

Description: This wine glass made from “cristallo” has a rounded funnel cuppa set on a merese which connects to the hollow a-symmetrical, three dimensional and spiralled – “snaked” – stem connecting by a small merese to the slightly conical foot. The stem is decorated with a turquoise snake like ornament from which an extremely small part is missing.

Origin: most probably the Netherlands.

Parallels:
– Pijzel-Dommisse and Eliëns, Glinsterend glas, 1500 jaar Europese glaskunst, pag. 82,
pict. 115, as an example for the snake like structure of the stem,
– Baumgartner, 2005, pag. 196,
– Tait, Venezianisches Glas, Taschenb¸pag. 188 afb. 142, again for the “snake” form,
– Glass in the Rijksmuseum Vol.I pag. 47 afb. 52, pag. 54 afb. 65. This glass is shown upside down
as the foot is missing and a silver dice holder has been mounted on the remaining lower stem part.
The dimensions of this glass are almost identical to the one in our collection.
– Amsterdams Historisch Museum, Willet Holthuysen, pag. 121 afb. 75,
with the same stem as our glass,
– Laméris Frides and Kitty, Venetiaans en Façon de Venise glas 1500-1700
exhibition 1991, page. 121 pict.. 117,. Is almost identical but has a folded rim foot, and has an
engraving. Our glass “escaped” the hands of the engraver.
– Henkes, Glas zonder glans, page.220 nr. 48.1, this for the construction of the stem. He states that the
stem of 48.1 is a build up of a twisted glass bar. This in contradiction with our glass having a twisted
hollow stem.
– Falkenhof Museum, Rheine, Glas funde aus einem unterirdischen kanalsystem
Band 1, stamfragment nr. 100 pag. 249, large picture on pag. 252-253. This catalogue is most
interesting as it holds recent discoveries.

Provenance:
– With Frides Laméris,
– In the owner’s collection since 2009

POINTED UNGUENTARIUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 1, 2019

POINTED UNGUENTARIUM of Joop van der Groen

282. inv.nr. 10-03 (2-TH2)

Roman Empire │ 1st century AD, probably 1st half
Size: ↑ 12,6 cm; Ø max. 2,5 cm; Ø rim 1,9 cm. │ Weight: 74 gram

Technique: Free blown. Tooled.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 9
Descripton: Transparent purple coloured glass. Tall neck, tapering gently inward to the top. Funnel-shaped mouth with a rounded rim. The neck swells slightly to form a small body before tapering to form a point.
Condition: Intact
Remarks: This form has been found in the western and in the eastern part of the Empire. The size can differ very much, from 7 cm up to 22 cm.
The basic colour of Roman glass is bluish-green. This has been caused because sand (the main element for making raw glass) has been polluted by iron oxide. By addition of some percents manganese oxide in the raw glass the colour changed into purple / aubergine.
Provenance: 2001 – 2009 P. Cuperus , Laren (NL), no. PEC045
2001 Jean-David Cahn AC, Basel (SW)
Published: Glass from the Roman Empire (P. Cuperus, 2009)
Reference: Solid Liquid (Fortune Fine Arts Ltd New York, 1999), nos. 85, 86 and 87; The Fascination of Ancient Glass – Dolf Schut Collection (M. Newby & D. Schut, 1999), no. 54;
Vom Luxuxobjekt zum Gebrauchsgefäss – Vorrömische und römische Gläser (Honroth, 2007), nos. 69 and 70; Fascinating Fragility – A Private Collection of Ancient Glass (Bijnsdorp, 2010), no. NFB 022; Roman and Early Byzantine Glass – a Private Collection (van Rossum, 2014), no. HVR 114

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