Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

COMPLIMENTARY PAIR OF ROMAN GLASS VESSELS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 19, 2019

Complimentary Pair of Roman Glass Vessels of Hans van Rossum

 

TALL AMPHORA

Date: 4th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean Size: ↑22.5 cm | ø 4.6 cm | Weight: 84 g

 

Technique: Body pattern-blown, neck and mouth free blown; handles and coil applied

Condition: Intact and almost clear, excellent condition

Description: Transparent pale yellow glass, tall elongated conical body with mold-blown vertical ribbing, outplayed and fire rounded rim, pale yellow coil wound around underside of mouth. Long cylindrical neck with a thick pale green glass coil around middle of neck. Two bifurcated handles of transparent green glass applied on shoulder, drawn up and attached to neck, one just above and one on the coil ring; one at right angle and one angular.

Provenance: Formerly part of collection Avi Koren, owner of a well-known real estate office in Jerusalem, prior to 2002.

Remarks: This type of vessel may have been used to store wine sauce (caroenum), which was a popular ingredient for many Roman recipes. It seems quite likely that the same glass worker who produced this vessel also made HVR 196. Both glass items were sold by Archaeological Center Tel Aviv-Israel during an auction, held on 24 September 2002; lot numbers 148 &149. There are several similar characteristics which confirm that both glasses must be made by the same glass worker, as there are: the use of exactly the same pale yellow and pale green glass for both items. The identical mold-blown rib decoration is also such a characteristic but the most impressive similarity is the way in which the glass worker formed both handles different; each glass vessel has one handle exactly at right angle and the other as an angular handle. These two glasses were also found together, which is special. The last characteristic of these two vessels is the way in which the glass worker, on an extremely unusual way, pinched a fold in the glass-rest which is attached to the neck. Both glass objects were part of the collection of Avi Koren, Jerusalem. Conclusion: both glasses were blown by the same glass worker.

Remarks II: A striking parallel of this amphora was found in July 1934, in a 4th century tomb in Beit Fajjar, 25 km. south of Jerusalem. This example has the same characteristics as HVR 082  and the one, part of the RMO Collection, inv. no. B 1899/5.5. It makes part of the collection of the Palestine Archaeological Museum. It may be possible that the glass worker of these specific amphoras was situated in the area of Jerusalem.

Published: Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 28, 24 September 2002 lot 148

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 107, 29 April – 28 August 2011

Reference: RMO Leiden, inv. no. B 1899/5.5 for a striking parallel with an identical shape and height. Probably a product from the same workshop. Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 40, 4 April 2007 lot 635 for a striking similarity in pale green glass, A Collection of Ancient Glass 500 BC – 500 AD,  P. L. W. Arts no.  67, Glas der Antiken Welt I, P. La Baume no. D77, Tafel 34, Ancient Glass in the Yale University Art Gallery, S. B. Matheson nos. 236 & 237

  –                

 

BOTTLE

Date: 4th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean Size: ↑13.2 cm | ø 8.2 cm |Weight: 79 g

 

Technique: Body pattern-blown, neck and mouth free blown; handle and coil applied

Condition: Intact, excellent condition

Description: Transparent pale yellow glass. Squat globular body, decorated with faint diagonal ribbing and nine vertical indentations. Tall neck widening towards body, a thick pale green glass coil around middle of neck. Everted mouth with rounded rim and a thin pale yellow coil wound around underside of mouth. Two opposite handles applied on shoulder, drawn up and attached to neck, under and finally tooled over neck coil, one handle at right angle and one handle angular. Indented base with rest of pontil.

Provenance: Collection Nico F. Bijnsdorp (NL), collection no. NFB 131 (2002-2015) Formerly part of collection Avi Koren, owner of a well-known real estate office in Jerusalem, prior to 2002.

Remarks: See information of HVR 082, pp. 310. After a divorce of about fifteenth years, these two glasses, product of the same glass worker, were reunited again in July 2015.

Published: Romeins Glas in particulier bezit, J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum 2011, p. 61 Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 28, 24 September 2002 lot 149

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 108, 29 April – 28 August 2011

Reference: Bonhams London, auction 12 December 1996 lot 85, without indentations Gläser der Antike, Sammlung Oppenländer, A. von Saldern no 491

One Response

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  1. wynkin said, on September 19, 2019 at 12:39 pm

    Wow! I’d love to see how the handles are adhered close up.


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