Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

BEAKERS WITH APPLIED GLASS THREADS (Fadenrippenbecher)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 20, 2019

Late Middle Ages glass in central and southern Europe dates from the late 12th C. to early 16th C.  The best late Medieval glass was either colorless or almost colorless with a straw tint. It appears that the majority of the glasses were for domestic use as table service.

These are two examples of Fadenrippenbecher.

Date: Early 15th C. before 1456 and Size: H 9.0 cm This example apparently was found in an old well used as a waste shaft. Also, in this same well fragments of very similar vessels were discovered. This picture is on page 291 of the book  Phonix aus Sand Und Asche, Glas des Mittlelalters, Erwin Baumgartner & Ongeborg Krueger, Munchen, 1989.

 

Date: Early 15th C. before 1456 and Size: H 9.5 cm.   This picture is on page 291 in the book Phonix aus Sand Und Asche, Glas des Mittlelalters, Erwin Baumgartner & Ongeborg Krueger, Munchen, 1989.

 

The sizes of this type of beaker differ considerably from a small (examples above) 9 cm in height to 22 cm.  The largest ones so far only found in Bohemia and the smaller versions in Northern Germany and The Netherlands.

 

Description of how these glasses were made: The ribs on these beakers were not mold-blown but consist of applied glass threads of the same glass. The blue decoration on the threads was not created by means of drops of blue glass on these ribs.  It was actually created by winding a thread of blue glass around a partially-blown beaker; further blowing then caused the blue thread to break up with pieces only adhering to the ribs. This procedure is schematically shown in Fig. 28 below.

 

 

 Two fragmentary Fadenrippenbecher have been found, namely in the towns of Groningen and Kampen, The Netherlands

 

 

One Response

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  1. wynkin said, on December 20, 2019 at 11:35 am

    Astounding, you never fail to amaze me.


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