Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

WONDERFUL GLASS CANES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 31, 2020

Wonderful Glass Canes

Glass canes have been used to make many different types of glass objects from the beginnings of glass making to the present day.  A cane is a hollow or solid thin rod of glass which can be clear and colorless, multi colored and opaque or mixtures of all of these. To make a cane a blob of molten glass attached to a pontil is stretched or drawn out to the desired thinness. These drawn rods can be twenty feet or more in length. The cold canes are then cut into the required lengths or thin slices depending on what is being made. There are as many different types of canes and procedures as there are objects made with them.  Glass canes are used to make millefiori, mosaic, air twist, opaque white or colored twist stems, and the Venetian filigrana glassware.

Additional informationLink to clip below

This is a link to a video made by Corning Museum of Glass on how canes are made and used.

For additional reading I highly  recommend one of the best books on the subject of cane making and Filigrana glass by Kitty Lameris,

“A Collection of Filigrana Glass, Kitty Lameris, Amsterdam, 2012″

The following examples of glassware made with canes are from the Allaire Collection and Museum collections.

English Glass 17th-18th Century in the Allaire Glass Collection

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 28, 2020

English green wines in Allaire Glass Collection

Click on the title above the pictured objects for additional information on them.

ENGLISH WRYTHEN ALE GLASSES: THREE EXAMPLES

Wrythen Jelly, Syllabub or Ale Glass

 07E Wrythen Jelly or Syllabub Glass c. 1780-1800

07E Wrythen Jelly or Syllabub Glass c. 1780-1800

RIBBED ENGLISH JELLY GLASS

16E English jelly or syllabub c. 1740

16E English jelly or syllabub c. 1740

English Glass Tankard

17E English Tandard c. 1770

17E English Tandard c. 1770

RIBBED ENGLISH JELLY GLASS

37E English ribbed Syllabub c. 1740

37E English ribbed Syllabub c. 1740

ENGLISH LEAD-GLASS JELLY

42E English Jelly c. 1680

42E English Jelly c. 1680

English Sweetmeat Glass

15E English Sweetmeat Glass c.1740

15E English Sweetmeat Glass c.1740

ENGLISH BALUSTER

20E Baluster Wine Glass c. 1720

20E Baluster Wine Glass c. 1720

ENGLISH PANELED BOWL WITH BLUE RIM

24E English panelled bowl 18th Century

24E English panelled bowl 18th Century

PAIR OF ENGLISH “HOCK” GLASSES 1760

35E A pair of green English wines c.1760

35E A pair of green English wines c.1760

ENGLISH OPAQUE TWIST WINE

36E Opaque white twist stem, English wine c. 1765

36E Opaque white twist stem, English wine c. 1765

English Green Wine Glass

55E Green English Wine c.1750-1760

55E Green English Wine c.1750-1760

A Pair Of Early English Gin Glasses

64E Pair of early English or American gin glasses 18th Century

64E Pair of early English or American gin glasses 18th Century

Large English Air Twist Wine Glass

65E Large English Air twist Wine 9 inches C. 1740

65E Large English Air twist Wine 9 inches C. 1740

English Wine Glass

82E Green English wine glass with blown hollow stem and dome foot. (82E)

82E Green English wine glass with blown hollow stem and dome foot.

Amethyst English Pitcher

88E Small English amethyst pitcher c. 1780

88E Small English amethyst pitcher c. 1780

ENGLISH WINE GLASS WITH INCISED TWIST STEM

 93E English wine with incised twist stem c. 1755

93E English wine with incised twist stem c. 1755

GREEN WINEGLASS MADE IN NEW ENGLAND OR ENGLAND

96E English or American light green wineglass c.1820

96E English or American light green wine glass c.1820

English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

97E-A Green stem with white opaque twist c.1765

97E-A Green stem with white opaque twist c.1765

English Green Opaque Twist Wine

97E-B English green white twist Wine c.1765

97E-B English green white twist Wine c.1765

ENGLISH GLASS BOTTLE WITH RASPBERRY PRUNTS

99E English Glass Bottle c. 1690

99E English Glass Bottle c. 1690

English Facon de Venise Glass Tazza

111E Allaire Collection Date 1670

Crystal Glass Small Spirit Carafe

118E Sprit Carafe

118E Arts & Crafts small spirit carafe c. 1880

ROMAN GLASS CINERARY URN WITH HANDLES AND LID

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 25, 2020

 

Roman Cinerary Urn With M Shaped Handles and Lid

From

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

 

                                                                                                               

Date 1st/2nd century AD Height: 22cm excluding lid.

Origin: These were found mainly in the Western Empire but some from North Africa and a few from Greece and Asia Minor.

Description: Body made from single piece of free blown glass with two M shaped handles applied and separate domed lid. The rim splayed out with tubular lip formed by turning the glass inwards. The two handles on opposing sides made with a thick trail of glass dropped first on the left side, lifted and dropped and action repeated to form the M shape.  After final attachment on right hand side the excess glass was drawn up against the side of the handle. No pontil mark.

Condition: Intact apart from crack on the rim.

Provenance: TEFAF Art Fair. Old German collection, In: David and Jennifer Giles collection, London (UK)

Remarks: Sometimes the tops were made in the form of a funnel to receive libations. They looked like inverted lids with a hole in the knop. However mostly the tops of these vessels were actual lids without an aperture in them.

Reference: LIGHTFOOT  2007 – Ancient Glass National Museums of Scotland Pages 107/108 items 247/249. WHITEHOUSE 1997 Roman Glass Volume 1, page 172/173 items 302/304, ISINGS  1957 Roman Glass Dated Finds Page 82 Item 63

 

GALLO-ROMAN PEAR-SHAPED GLASS JUG WITH THREAD

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 22, 2020

Gallo-Roman pear-shaped glass jug with thread

From

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

Date: 2nd-   – 4th  Century AD,  Rhineland, Gallic area Size: ↑ 16.9 cm  │  Ø 9.0 cm

Classification: Morin-Jean (1913), form 50, Isings (1957), form 120a, Trier 124a

Provenance: David and Jennifer Giles collection, London (UK), ex Weber Cologne (Germany), formerly Fritz Ohrtmann collection, Kiel (Germany), 1960th-1970th

Description: Free-blown yellow-greenish transparent jug with oval-shaped body. From low in the neck it is wound with irregularly running glass threads in the same color 22 x counterclockwise to the base. A gracefully curved three-ribbed ear is raised from the shoulder and attached to the lip with a double loop as a thumb rest. The lip itself is folded inward. Sharp pontil.

Condition: Intact, some weathering and iridescense

Remarks: Oval-shaped jugs are characteristic of the Western Roman Empire. According to Isings, they are known in various designs, including a narrow or wide base, a chain-like ear or a zigzag edge around the neck  They have been found from the 2nd Century and production continues to the 4th Century. There are also spiral specimens with a more spherical body, such as in Landesmuseum Trier, inv. 03 .273 and The Hermitage Museum, St.Petersburg. Also in the Eastern Roman Empire there are jugs that are wound with glass wire, these usually have a slightly different shape and color, often they have a clover mouth →  thread decorated jug (9.7 cm), also belonging to the Windmill Collection of Roman Glass.

Refernces:  Collection Verres Antiques Monsieur D. auction Paris 3/4 June 1985, lot 478, height 14.2 cm, 2nd-4th Century; Roman Glass in Landesmuseum, Trier (Goethert-Polaschek) fig. 24 no. 4; Metropolitan Museum NY inv. no. 81.10.195 (narrower oval body) 3rd-4th Century; David and Jennifer Giles collection London, 10.5 cm high; Landesmuseum Joanneum Graz (Austria), height 21.1 cm, with wire around the neck); Landesmuseum Bonn inv. 2386, 18 cm, wire neck and body; Hermitage Museum St. Petersburg No. 256 (variant with few threads near the base bottom), 17.8 cm high, late 1st-2nd Century.

ANGLO-SAXON GLASS FROM THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 18, 2020
An Anglo-Saxon cone beaker found in the high-status 6th-7thC cemetery at Faversham, Kent. at Corning Museum of Glass.

What is Anglo-Saxon glass? It is Frankish-Merovingian glass found in England either having been made there or imported between 5th to 8th centuries and also found in dated Anglo Saxon graves sites. 

The Anglo-Saxon were a group of people who came in ships across the North Sea in the 5th C. to inhabit and rule territories that are today part of England and Wales.  These new people were a mix of tribes from Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands, the three largest groups were the Angles, the Saxons and the Jutes.

Historically, the Anglo-Saxon period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman Conquest. The early Anglo-Saxon period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language. Charters and law were also established. The term Anglo-Saxon is popularly used for the language that was spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons in England and eastern Scotland between at least the mid-5th century and the mid-12th century. In scholarly use, it is more commonly called Old English. (Wikipedia)

Examples of Anglo-Saxon Glass from the early middle ages (Migration Period) 5th to 8th centuries. Distributions are below the objects.

An early Anglo-Saxon cone beaker, 5th–6th century, found at Acklam, Yorkshire, England, in 1892. Now at the Corning Museum of Glass.

An Anglo-Saxon glass palm cup of the 6th-7th century, found in the 18th century at St Martin in the Fields, London. At The British Museum.

A 7th-century Anglo-Saxon glass drinking horn, from Rainham, London. At The British Museum.

Also worth noting that the glass-workers who made the claw- globular beakers in the 5th to mid-6thC — and the later Taplow & Broomfield, Essex (pictured) items — were using glass imported from the eastern Mediterranean, At The British Museum.

Anglo-Saxon blue glass bowl, c. 600 AD, from Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire; in the Ashmolean Museum

A 7th-century claw beaker found in Vendel grave 12 in Sweden; believed to have probably been an import made in England, arguably Kent. At The British Museum.

Four green glass claw beakers, found in the early 7th-century Anglo-Saxon barrow burial at Taplow. At The British Museum.

One of the wonderful early Anglo-Saxon claw-beakers from Castle Eden (Durham) & Mucking (Essex)

A glass claw beaker found in grave 204 (c.520–540 AD) at Finglesham, Kent, now in the Ashmolean Museum

An early Anglo-Saxon claw beaker from late 6th- to 7th-century cemetery at Wrotham, Kent. At The British Museum.

This object was found in the region around Cambridge at a construction site. It is remarkable that it was not damage. It is now in the Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge UK.

Below is an active link on this blog to The British Museum collection of Roman and Merovigian/Anglo-Saxons glass. and Museum or Archaeology and Anthropology Cambridge UK.

**THE BRITISH MUSEUM: POST ROMAN AND MEROVINGIAN GLASS 5TH – 7TH C

GLASS AT MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE UK

ROMAN BLUE GLASS SIDONIAN BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 14, 2020

 

Sidonian Moulded Glass Bottle of Toru Nishiyama glass collection

 

Date: 1st Century B.C. Size: h. 7.5 cm   d. 4.1 cm

 

 

Remark: Reference from the Book ‘GLASS, Its Origin, History, Chronology, Technic and Classification to the Sixteenth Century, 1927’ written by Gustavus A. Eisen ( see book cover below)

From Page 233, Volume 1.

The name ‘The Temple Series’ is derived from the sacred vases depicted in molding on each of the six sides of the flasks. Each space contains one vase, flanked by columns which latter support an arch with tympanum gable, always decorated with a large conical object.

It is not clear what temple was actually represented, but it is not unlikely that it was the temple of the Sidonian Venus, Ashtoreth. This theory is suggested because the cone standing in each tympanum might represent the cone under which the deity was worshiped as a stone or cone fallen from the heaven, and this might have been one of them.

 

 

 

Another reference from the book shown below.

ROMAN GLASS BOWL WITH COLORED BLOBS AND TRAILS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 11, 2020

NFB 377 BOWL WITH COLORED BLOBS AND TRAIL From Nico F. Bijnsdorp

Date: First half of 4th century AD. Rhineland, Cologne.

Size: H: 9.8 cm. D max: 11.5 cm. D rim: 11.5 cm. Weight 156 gr.

Condition: Intact. Some weathering.

Technique: Free blown. Blobs and trails applied.

Description: Transparent very pale green glass. Gold brown and emerald-green blobs and trails. Hemispherical body with slightly concave bottom and everted cracked-off rim. No pontil. Body decorated with two rows of large glass blobs. Upper row in alternating gold-brown and emerald-green, lower row reversed sequence of colors. Blobs in lower row placed in the middle of two higher blobs. At approximately 1.8 and 2.5 cm below rim two horizontal encircling thin threads in gold-brown with a thick zigzag trail in emerald-green in between. Blobs slightly bulging at inside and outside of wall.

Remarks: Glass vessels with blobs were produced in both the Eastern and Western part of the Roman Empire as from the second half of the 3rd century AD. The way of decoration in both parts however was different. The Eastern part became well known for applying  small blue blobs to hemispherical bowls (see NFB 227) and conical beakers/lamps (see NFB 185 and NFB 302). In the Western part and more specific in Cologne the larger blobs in deferent color-settings became more characteristic for the area. Gold-brown, emerald-green and blue became the most popular colors. Later examples were additionally decorated with colored horizontal encircling lines with zigzag trails in between.

Provenance: The Sheikh Saoud Bin Mohamed Ali Althani Collection, Doha, Qatar., Collection Kai Schmidt, Cologne, Germany.

Exhibited: The National Museum of Antiquities, Leiden (NL), “GLASS”, 1 June 2020 – 28 February 2021.

References: Fremersdorf 1959, Römisch-Germanisches Museum Köln, Nos. 131-132., Fremersdorf 1962, Römisch-Germanisches Museum Köln, Nos. 64-68. ,Klein 1999, Landesmuseum Mainz, Inv. Nr. N-3352, p. 129 and p. 132. ,Klein 1999, Rheinisches Landesmuseum Bonn, Inv. Nr. 17295, p. 137.,Klein 1999, Musée des Antiquités Nationale, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, p. 1342.

ROMAN GLASS VESSELS WITH POLYCHROME BLOBS AND ZIG-ZAG TRAILING

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 8, 2020
Trier and Naumann-Steckner, Zerbrechlicher Luxus: Koln-ein Zentrum antiker Glaskunt, Marcus Trier and Friederike Naumann-Steckner, 2016

The examples here show a distinct group of Roman glass bowls and cone beakers probably made in the Western Provinces during the first half of the 4th C. AD.  The main bodies of these drinking vessels were manufactured of slightly greenish glass and were then decorated. The glass artists used plain trails, zig-zag trails and blobs using sometimes as many as four different colors: amber yellow, emerald green, golden brown and blue.  When applying the glass blob, at the point where the hot drop of glass hit the wall of the vessel it became soft and formed a dent that can sometimes be felt on the inside wall.

Below are additional examples.

ROMAN GLASS BOWL WITH BASKET HANDLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 5, 2020

GLASS BOWL WITH BASKET HANDLE of Hans van Rossum

Date: 4th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean Size: ↑8.3 cm (including handle) | ø 4.7 cm (body) | Weight 50 g

Technique: Free blown, handle applied

Condition: Intact, iridescence

Description: Transparent, thick and turquoise-bluish colored glass; flared body. Rim fire-polished.  A heavy coil for the handle, made of dark green glass; applied on rim, drawn up and down, making an arc and attached to opposite side of the rim. Base flattened with no traces of a pontil.

Provenance: Artemis Gallery Ancient Art, USA 31 January 2008 Ex private New York Collection, acquired 1960s; and thence by descent

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 263 April 29 – 28 August 2011

Reference: Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 54, 27 March 2013 lot 280 Fascinating Fragility, a Private Collection of Ancient Glass, N. F. Bijnsdorp 2010 no. NFB, 072 Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 30, 15 October 2003 lot 180 Gläser der Antike, Sammlung Oppenländer, A. von Salder & B. Nolte 1974 no. 600 Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, accession no. X. 21.214

ROMAN GLASS BEAKER

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 2, 2020

BEAKER of Hans van Rossum

 

Date: Mid-to-late 1st century AD | Northwest Provinces of the Roman Empire, probably Northern Italy Size↑8.5 cm | ø 5.8 cm | Weight 82 g

 

Technique: Free blown, rim ground, wheel-cut grooves

Classification: Calvi 1968: gruppo A | Isings 1957: form 29

Condition: Intact

Description: A beaker of transparent yellowish green glass, cylindrical body and straight walls. Straight rim, sloping inward; rim ground and polished. On wall, three wide horizontal bands of grooves, with the uppermost just below rim, alternating with three narrow grooves. Flattened base, no pontil scar.

 

 

Remarks: This type of beaker with grounded rim was, as Stern says, made in three basic shapes cylindrical, ovoid, and truncated conical. The majority has a flat or slightly concave base. The truncated conical beaker may have been the earliest variant. Made in Italy and the northwest provinces, these glass beakers never became as common as the so-called Hofheim cup. Examples from the eastern Mediterranean and the north coast of the Black Sea were probably imported from the West. The ovoid and truncated conical shapes have parallels in slightly earlier, thin-walled pottery. (Stern 2001)

Provenance: Cologne art market; Axel Weber, 15 April 1997 German private collection

Published: Antiek Glas, de Kunst van het Vuur, R. van Beek cat. no. 83

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 34  April 29- 28 August 2011, Museum Simon van Gijn Dordrecht (NL), February 2004 Allard Pierson Museum Amsterdam (NL), de Kunst van het Vuur, exp. no. 83 May 29 – 16 September 2001

Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Accession Number 74.51.250 for an identical specimen, ex Cesnola Collection, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Accession Number 29.100.84 for an identical specimen, but in blue glass, Roman, Byzantine and Early Medieval Glass – Ernesto Wolf Collection, E.M. Stern 2001 no. 20 (almost ovoid body) Vetri antichi del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Este, A.Toniolo 2000 no. 236 (conical body)

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