Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

Three Facon De Venise Wine Glasses from France

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 10, 2021

Three Facon De Venise Wine Glasses from France

of The Allaire Collection

77E: Facon de Venise wine goblet (verre de fougere – Fern Glass) was probably made France. The glass has a straw tint and a pattern-molded bowl on a hollow stem with faint diagonal ribs.

76E: Facon de Venise wine goblet (verre de fougere – Fern Glass) was probably made in France. The glass has a straw tint and a conical pattern-molded bowl with a hollow stem.

68E: Facon de Venise goblet (verre de fougere – Fern Glass) was probably made in France. The glass is of straw tint with a pattern-molded bowl and an elongated inverted baluster hollow stem.

Date for all: Early 18th Century

References: 1. Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Stye 1500-1750, Jutta Annette Page, page163 (see this reference below),  2. The Van Beek Collection, Lameris, #37, 38 (see this reference below) 3. The Collection Engels-De Lange, Lameris # 58,

Remarks: Verre de Fougère is a sub-type of Façon de Venise glass from France and refers to glass made using fern-ash as a flux. The ash can give a specific “smoky”, brownish, ginger or sandy coloring to the glass. For additional information on VENETIAN & FAÇON de VENISE GLASS (click on this active link)

Remarks II: The fashion for Venetian glass ended in the late 17th century with the advent of new types of glass (lead crystal) discovered in England and Bohemia. The qualities of these new materials, were its brilliance and clarity especially those of the English lead glass.  The new glass captivated the wealthier French public. In more modest homes, the locally made verre de pivette gained popularity. A final reason for the decline of Venetian-style glass in France at the beginning of the 18th century was the developing fashion for pivette drinking glasses, blown of very light verre de fougrer.  These new vessels, which were often represented by such painters as Chardin’s 1728 painting The Buffet, were considered to be more suitable than Venetian glass for the drinking of wine.  Above paraphrased from Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Stye 1500-1750, Jutta Annette Page, The Corning Museum of Glass, 2004

 

The Fern glasses are shown in the picture below on the left hand side of the table.

Chardin’s 1728 painting The Buffet, now in the Louvre

Reference 1

60.3.16, 58.3.174, 79.3.550 found in Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Stye 1500-1750, Jutta Annette Page, page163 In the Corning Museum of Glass

Clear bubbly thin glass with yellow tinge; free-blown and pattern-molded. Flat foot with rough pontil mark and concentric tool marks; slender hollow stem with swelling at upper section, funnel bowl; on the lower bowl a faint pattern with a band of “diamonds” or dots (three rows) above vertical ribs; faint swirling ribs on stem.

Reference 2

The Van Beek Collection, Lameris, #37, 38

#37 Early 18th C H: 13.5 cm, bowl 7.4 cm, foot 7.0 cm

Wine glass with rounded funnel bowl. Mould-blown bowl with honeycomb pattern above sixteen ribs Hollow mould-blown cigar-shaped stem. Light conical foot.

#38 Early 18th C H: 12.0 cm, bowl 6.1 cm, foot 6.5 cm

Wine glass with rounded funnel bowl. Mould-blown bowl with honeycomb pattern above eighteen ribs Hollow mould-blown stem in the form off an elongated baluster with diagonal ribe. Light conical foot.

For more information on French fern glass see the essay by Anna Lameris in The Van Beek Collection, 2015 p 98-99

 

 

 

 

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