Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

GLASS VESSELS IN SHAPE OF SHELLS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 28, 2021

Glass Vessels in Shape Of Shells Found in Various Museums

Group of flasks from Romishch-Germanischen Museum in Cologne

The scallop shell motif can be found on glass dishes, bowls, beakers and flasks from Roman times to the present. They were made by the Romans in the Rhineland during the 1st to 4th centuries and were copied at Murano in the 16th-17th centuries. Technique used was mold blowing.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Early 17th C. H: 26.5 cm

FOUR EARLY ROMAN RIBBED GLASS BOWLS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 24, 2021

Four Roman Ribbed Bowls in The Allaire Collection

Glass bowls with ribbing have been made since Hellenistic times from the 1st century BC into the first few decades of the 1st century AD.  Reportedly used as drinking vessels they apparently had wide spread use and popularity.  The examples preserved from this period are quite varied in size, color and even process of manufacture.  The earlier bowls 30R and 67R were probably not cast,  but may have been formed from thick round discs. The ribs were formed hot with a pincer tool and then the disc was slumped into a bowl shape.  The later ribbed bowls 19R was made with a blowpipe and ribs were formed with a pincer tool. A second type of these later bowls 84R was made by blowing the glass into a mold. The examples here illustrate a variety of glass rubbed bowls from antiquity.

For additional information on the pictured bowls click on the active links below.

19R ROMAN RIBBED GLASS BOWL

30R HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

67R ROMAN MONOCHROME RIBBED GLASS BOWL

84R ROMAN SHALLOW GLASS LIBATION BOWL

GALLO-ROMAN GLASS JAR

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 20, 2021

Gallo-Roman Glass Jar

From
The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

Date: 1st – 2nd-   Century AD,  Rhineland, Gallic area Size: ↑ 6.5 cm (incl. thumb rest) ,  Ø 6.7 cm

Classification: Isings (1957), form 57 (variant)

Provenance:  Demeulenaere collection (Belgium)

Description: Blue-green transparent free-blown jug with a round belly. The underside arches up in the middle and has a stand ring. Halfway down the abdomen a post of glass is attached that leads up to the ring-shaped top edge and then rises above as a thumb rest.

Condition: Intact

Published: 1995 Verres Antiques et de l’Islam, Ancienne collection de Monsieur D., nr.461

Remarks: Normally, these types of miniature jugs do not have a ring base, such as the Isings parallel from Heerlen and the one from the museum in Zagreb. The example at Yale University does have a ring foot and also a double thumb stud.

References: Roman Glass in Limburg (Isings) nr. 211); Ancient Glass in the Yale University nr.202; Archeological Museum Zagreb, inv. nr.11846; Eisen pl.94. nr.361 mouth →  thread decorated jug (9.7 cm), also belonging to the Windmill Collection of Roman Glass. (pictured below)

References: Collection Verres Antiques Monsieur D. auction Paris 3/4 June 1985, lot 478, height 14.2 cm, 2nd-4th Century; Roman Glass in Landesmuseum, Trier (Goethert-Polaschek) fig. 24 no. 4; Metropolitan Museum NY inv. no. 81.10.195 (narrower oval body) 3rd-4th Century; David and Jennifer Giles collection London, 10.5 cm high; Landesmuseum Joanneum Graz (Austria), height 21.1 cm, with wire around the neck); Landesmuseum Bonn inv. 2386, 18 cm, wire neck and body; Hermitage Museum St. Petersburg No. 256 (variant with few threads near the base bottom), 17.8 cm high, late 1st-2nd Century.

NAMING THE STEMS ON TWO FAÇON DE VENISE WINE GLASSES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 17, 2021

Example: 13

FAÇON DE VENISE WINE GLASS #36 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dimensions: H: 15,1 cm.; ø cuppa 7,7, cm.; ø foot 9,6 cm.; weight 153,6 gram

Origen & Date: Southern Netherlands around 1650

Stem Definition: a hollow and flattened dumb-bell knops between two thin mereses or a double hollow flattened spherical knops between two merese with a wide folded flat foot

For additional information on this FAÇON DE VENISE WINE GLASS follow this active link

Example: 15

LIEGE FAÇON DE VENISE GLASS #55 of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

 Dimensions: ­ 18,6 cm.; ­ stem 10,4 cm.; ø bowl 8,2 cm.; ø foot 8 cm.; weight 108 gram

 Origin & Date: Southern Netherlands, Liege, mid-17th century.

Stem Definition: a compound repeating pattern of a small hollow knop attached larger hollow knop separated by a merese with two pinched (blue) ornaments

Description: The stem of this Liege Façon de Venise glass has a restrained exuberance characteristic for that time for the Southern Netherlands but, is still quite vivid from the two pinched blue ornaments. The spiralled trumpet optically blown bowl is set via a merese to the first small hollow knop directly followed by the largest somewhat flattened hollow knop to which the blue ornaments are attached. Followed by a merese connecting to a concave formed transition piece set to another hollow knop followed by a merese connecting to a short solid section which connects to the conical foot.

Material: soda glass.

For additional information on this FAÇON DE VENISE WINE GLASS follow this active link

ROMAN GLASS JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 14, 2021

ROMAN GLASS JUG of  Hans van Rossum

Probably mid-3rd century – early 4th century AD. | Eastern Mediterranean

Size↑13.6 cm | ø 10.0 cm | max. opening mouth 7.5 cm | Weight 174 g

Technique: Free blown, handle and thread applied

Description:Transparent yellow glass with similar colored handle and thread. Squat bulbous body; flaring wide trefoil mouth; rim rounded in flame, short cylindrical neck, handle applied on shoulder, drawn up and attached to back of rim, drawn up to edge of rim, excess glass snapped off in a fold.            Started at base of neck just to center of base a thin thread, wound counterclock-wise with approximately 14 revolutions. Slightly indented base with pontil scar.

Condition: Intact, in a perfect condition with incredible iridescence

Provenance: ex private collection USA 1986 – 2017

Reference: Fire and Sand, Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum, A.  Antonaras nos. 253 – 257 Roman, Byzantine, Early Medieval Glass, E. M. Stern nos. 90 & 91 Alfred Wolkenberg, Ancient Glass, Christie’s London 9 July 1991 lot 63

ROMAN SHALLOW GLASS LIBATION BOWL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 11, 2021

84R and The Bronze Phiale of The Allaire Collection

Date: 1st Century, Size: H. 4.0 cm., D. (rim) 12.5 cm., (max.) 13.5 cm., W. 102.3 g.

Technique: Blown in a three-part mold, two vertical sections and baseplate.

Condition: Intact, with almost invisible repair.

Description: Shallow bowl decorated with over 100 vertical ribs extending from shoulder to horizontal rib slightly above bottom; below this, second horizontal rib; under base, raised dot at center and three concentric circles. Mold seams faintly visible on rim.

Remarks: The bronze Greek or Roman Phiale (picture below) resembles this Roman shallow glass libation bowl. The ancient Romans also made shallow bowls out of earthenware or metal for drinking and libations at sacrifices. These bowls are also called Patera.

References: Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass Volume II #498, Ancient Glass at the Newark Museum #39, Glases Der Antike Sammlung Ewin Oppenlander #451

VENETIAN AND FACON de VENISE GLASS WINE GOBLETS WITH TRUMPET-SHAPE BOWLS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 8, 2021

The Naming of Stem Formations

79E Venetian wine glass with trumpet-shape bowl with a broad mouth resting on a collar or merese with a thin hollow a jambe stem and flat circular foot. Dimensions: H= 17 cm, Stem H = 7.5 Weight = 54.8 grams, Date: 17th century Origin: Venice Material: cristallo glass Stem definition:  a merese with thin hollow baluster or more appropriately a jambe stem. Remarks: Cristallo is a type of soda glass developed in Venice before the 15th century. It was made almost colorless, pale-yellow to smoky gray, so it would resemble Rock-Crystal which is natural quartz or pure silica. Ref: The Golden Age of Venetian Glass, Hugh Tait 1979 #55, Christie’s March 28, 2000 # 136-139

84E Façon de Venise Glass with a trumpet-shape bowl with a broad mouth a hollow knop and inverted baluster stem on a flat circular foot. Dimensions: H= 16 cm, Stem H = 6.0 Weight = 70.5 grams, Date: Early 17th century Origin: The Netherlands or France Stem definition: hollow knop and inverted baluster Remarks: This is an early 17th century Facon de Venise goblet in a classic shape and in excellent condition. Ref: Glass in the Rijksmuseum Vol. I #16, Christie’s Mar. 2000 #139

Active link information on: NAMING: STEM FORMATIONS A TO Z ON VENETIAN AND FAÇON DE VENISE WINE GLASSES

LARGE ROMAN GLASS JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 5, 2021

Large Roman Jug of Hans van Rossum

 Date: Late 3rd – 4th century A.D. | Syria Size: ↑26.0 cm | ø 11.5 cm | Weight: 460 g

 Technique: Free-blown; handle, coil and foot applied; tooled                              

Condition: Intact; one very small and almost invisible imperfection; slightly earth residues

Description: Transparent yellow-brown glass; spherical body with broad shoulder tapering to the applied base; high, cylindrical neck and flaring mouth, with applied vernacular coil in yellow-brown glass below the rim and a thick pinched collar around the lower neck; thick ribbed handle applied on lower shoulder drawn up and attached to edge of rim; triangular thumb-rest projecting above the rim. Applied irregular foot ring, pushed up base, rest of pontil mark. 

Provenance: Mr. David en Mrs. Jennifer Giles, London (2001 – 2020), Christopher Sheppard, London 2001, Formerly part of the Collection Harry Toulch, Montreal- Canada, Edward Safani Gallery New York, 1978

Remarks: Remarkable is the more or less same height of identical jugs, known to me. It appears to be a product of a single glass workshop or a specific area in Syria.

References: Christie’s London, 2 April 2014 no. 24 (formerly part of the Plesch Collection – AGv29h), Christie’s New York, 9 December 2010 no. 87 (2), Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, N. Kunina 1997 no. 396, Shining Vessels, Fortuna Fine Arts Ltd. 1991 no. 127, Glass von der Antike bis zum Jugendstil, Sammlung Hans Cohn, A. von Saldern 1980 cat. no. 127 Römische Kleinkunst, Sammlung Karl Löffler, P. La Baume & J. W. Salomonson, 1976 no. 152 Glassammlung Hentrich – Antike und Islam, A. von Saldern 1974 no. 55 for a striking parallel

Active Link to: MINIATURE ROMAN JUG

EXAMPLES OF EARLY GLASS ROEMERS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 2, 2021

All of the Roemers shown in the post are in the Allaire Collection of Glass

EARLY ROEMER

Early Roemers have an ovoid bowl attached to an open stem decorated with pulled prunts and a foot with pinched toes. Unlike later Roemers like example 58E there is no spiral foot. The early Roemer form is closer to the Berkemeyer, the name given to another early Roemer type which has a flared bowl. See example E12. Roemer 56E has a slightly flared ovoid bowl. The discoloration on this early Roemer 56E, is due to the soil where it was found. Both 56E and 40E have a restored bowls. Early Roemers generally come from the Rhineland and Netherlands

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