Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

ISLAMIC GLASS BOWL WITH OCTAGON STAR

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 30, 2021

AcoaG  # 68  ISLAMIC GLASS BOWL WITH OCTAGON STAR

of
The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

Size: ↑ 3.5 -3.7 cm | Ø Mouth : 10 -10.5 cm | Ø Base facet: 5.8 – 6cm| Weight: 97 g  |

Date: 11th-12th century  A.D. from Persia

Technique:  Mold-blown glass and stained; tooled on the pontil. Painted with a lusterware octagon in gold star and with floral motifs resembling written text in Arabic language. Created by a double vessel method and sealed with a cobalt-blue rim. Pontil is abraded.

Remarks:

1. It is under the Abassid caliphate (750-1258) that Muslim art flourished from Spain to Afghanistan. The Muslim ceramists developed two techniques that gained great attention – first in the Muslim countries and then in Europe through Spain – the earthenware and the metallic luster.

2. The metallic luster is the great innovation of the end of the 8th century. It was considered as an attempt to compensate for the religious prohibitions on the use of gold and silver tableware. This luster was obtained by depositing metallic salts on a fired clay or glass object and annealing it in a reducing atmosphere. This technique made it possible to imitate the metal and it knew such a popularity that it was picked up again by the Hispano-Moorish of the 15th century

3. Venus-Ishtar was a guiding light or orientation point for sailors that transported goods across the Mediterranean sea during many ages. The octagon, created by two squares, gives inspiration to  many natural and philosophical thoughts. The eight-pointed star began to appear in Islamic art in the Middle Ages.

Condition: The object is intact. The surface is very slightly weathered. The glass contains one crack leading from the star to the rim. Through time moisture penetrated the double glass vessel deteriorated the painted floral motifs or text slightly.

Provenance: From a private dutch collection, first publication.

Literature: David Whitehouse, Stefano Carboni, Robert Brill and William Gudenrath in:

Glass of  the Sultans, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, 2002.

Sasanian and Post-Sasanian Glass, The Corning Museum of Glass, NY, 2005.

ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 26, 2021

RIBBED BOWL of Joop van der Groen

Roman Empire ǀ Late 1st century BC – 1st century AD Size: ↑ 4,2 cm; Ø 13,0 cm  ǀ Weight 183 gram

Technique: Sagged, tooled and lathe-cut. Rotary-polished on interior, top and outside of rim.  Fire-polished on rest of exterior. The ribs were possibly formed using a fork-like tool to push against the hot surface of the glass, probably when the disk was still flat. Sometimes, it is possible to see groups of three or four

Classification: Isings 1957 form 3c

Description: Translucent lightblue colored glass. Shallow bowl, rounded by grinding, flares up and slightly out from body which bulges, then curves in towards concave bottom.  On the exterior fifty-three irregular ribs round the sides, more or less vertical, from 1,5 cm below rim, tapering off towards bottom, most disappearing before center.

Remarks: Almost all ribbed bowls of Isings form 3c have more ribs than this one: ten to twenty.  Usually they also have horizontal engraved grooves on the interior, something this bowl doesn’t have.

Condition: Intact

Provenance: 1996 – 2010 P.E. Cuperus, Laren (the Netherlands), 1996 Axel Weber, Köln (Germany)

 References:  Glasses of Antiquity – Collection Oppenländer (von Saldern, 1975), no.257 Early Ancient Glass – The Toledo Museum of Art, (Grose, 1989), no. 236 en no. 237 Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum – The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts (Israeli, 2003), no. 71, Solid Liquid (Fortuna Fine Arts Ltd New York, 1999), no. 52

MERRY CHRISTMAS & HAPPY HOLIDAYS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 25, 2021

Best Wishes in 2022

ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 24, 2021

RIBBED BOWL of Joop van der Groen

Roman Empire ǀ Late 1st century BC – 1st century AD Size: ↑ 4,2 cm; Ø 13,0 cm  ǀ Weight 183 gram

Technique: Sagged, tooled and lathe-cut. Rotary-polished on interior, top and outside of rim.  Fire-polished on rest of exterior. The ribs were possibly formed using a fork-like tool to push against the hot surface of the glass, probably when the disk was still flat. Sometimes, it is possible to see groups of three or four

Classification: Isings 1957 form 3c

Description: Translucent lightblue colored glass. Shallow bowl, rounded by grinding, flares up and slightly out from body which bulges, then curves in towards concave bottom.  On the exterior fifty-three irregular ribs round the sides, more or less vertical, from 1,5 cm below rim, tapering off towards bottom, most disappearing before center.

Remarks: Almost all ribbed bowls of Isings form 3c have more ribs than this one: ten to twenty.  Usually they also have horizontal engraved grooves on the interior, something this bowl doesn’t have.

Condition: Intact

Provenance: 1996 – 2010 P.E. Cuperus, Laren (the Netherlands), 1996 Axel Weber, Köln (Germany)

 References:  Glasses of Antiquity – Collection Oppenländer (von Saldern, 1975), no.257 Early Ancient Glass – The Toledo Museum of Art, (Grose, 1989), no. 236 en no. 237 Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum – The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts (Israeli, 2003), no. 71, Solid Liquid (Fortuna Fine Arts Ltd New York, 1999), no. 52

PART TWO OF MEDIEVAL BEAKERS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 19, 2021

Medieval Beakers in the Late Middle Ages 12th to 14th C

of the Allaire Glass Collection

This group includeds primarily Waldglas or forest-glass vessels produced in the later Middle Ages are from northern Germany, the Low Countries, and central Europe. These objects were made mostly of transparent green glass. The color came from the presence of impurities (iron oxide) in the raw materials.  This type of glass particularly the Berkemeyers and Krautstrunks evolved in the 17th century into the Early Roemer and then into the classic Roemer which is still produced in the present day. This is an active link on this blog to Part One RIDGED MEDIEVAL BEAKER with DISTINCTIVE FOOT

12E This early type of Wald glass is called a Berkemeyer.  It has a flaring bowl on a prunted stem with pinched foot ring. Found in Germany. To view all the Roemers and Wald glass in this collection click here.

13E Krautsrunk is the German word for cabbage stalk.  In glass it is a type of beaker with a cup-shaped mouth curving outward above an encircling thread and a barrel shaped body decorated with prunts. These were made mostly in Germany roughly between 1490-1530.   It is part of group of glasses called forest or wald glass and usually is a rich dark green color. The krautsrkunk along with the berkemeyer were the forerunners of the roemer.

Ref: Whitehouse, Medieval Glass for Popes, Princes and Peasants 2010 #77, Ricke, 2005 Amendt Collection #49, Baumgartner, 1988 #342

Early Roemers

40E & 56E Early Roemers have an ovoid bowl attached to an open stem decorated with pulled prunts and a foot with pinched toes. Unlike later Roemers like example 58E there is no spiral foot. The early Roemer form is closer to the Berkemeyer, the name given to another early Roemer type which has a flared bowl. See example E12. Roemer 56E has a slightly flared ovoid bowl. The discoloration on this early Roemer 56E, is due to the soil where it was found. Both 56E and 40E have a restored bowls. Early Roemers generally come from the Rhineland and Netherlands

Miscellaneous Waldglas Vessels from Late Middle Ages

86E This is dark green wald glass beaker with a short stem and spiral foot from the late Medieval period. Most beakers of this type and date are decorated with applied trails or prunts. This plain example is not common. It may be from Germany H: 8 cm Date: 1500-1550 Ref: Baumgartner-Glas: Des Mittelalters und der Renaissance, Die Sammlung Karl Amendt, Erwin Baumgartner, Dusseldorf, 2005 #127, ravers Le Verre Du Moyen Age A La Renaisannce, le museo des antigiutes de Seine-Martime a Rouen, Daniele Foy, 1995 p. 319, 414

105E Keulenglas club glass is a variety of Stangenglas decorated with a milled trailing wound spirally around the slightly club shaped beaker on a pedestal foot with a kick. H: 22cm Date: First half of the 17th C or earlier, Ref: Museum Fur Kunsthandwerk, Frankfurt # 252, 253, 254

120E The Kuttrolf, mainly from Germany in the 16th C, is a beaker commonly found with several glass tubes, sometimes twisted, forming the neck having a cup-like upper container.  The example here represents a variant with a single open neck. The lower part of this beaker has a pushed in base and pontil mark. Condition: broken and repaired H: 18 cm D: 1560 Ref: Christies Interiors, Sept. 2013 Lot # 199, Henkes, Glass Without Gloss, 1994, #27.2, Baumgartner, Phoenix aus Sand and Asche, 1988 #383, Baumgartner, Amend Collection, 2005, #64,65 (double) Provenance: Collection of E. Martin Wunsch

Examples of non-Waldglas Vessels from Late Middle Ages

110E Trailed Beaker from the Netherlands 17th Century

The simple shape of this beaker has been decorated by a thin trail of glass spiraling around the body. It is possible that the maker was influenced by the Venetian glass styling of the time.  It was probably made in the Netherlands.

74E Warzenbecher 17th Century

Warzenbecher(German) literally means wart beaker also called a bossed beaker. This is a small olive-tinted beaker molded with bosses and having a high kick in base. There are two types of beakers with this name. The first is generally lighter in color, weight and from the Netherlands as shown in this example. It is made by mould-blown decoration of drops, tears or warts on the tumbler. The bottom of this beaker has a pattern with a star derived from the mould. The second type is made of heavy and thick green glass in the shape of a tumbler and decorated with scattered prunts of irregular shapes or raspberry prunts. The prunts are applied to the beaker as molten blobs of glass.

ROMAN GLASS CUPPA WITH FOOT

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 14, 2021

RG – 21. Roman Cuppa with Foot

from the Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen collection

H = 7,5 cm.; ø 7 cm.; ø foot 3,4 cm.; weight 30,7 grams.

Origin: Think at this moment Middle East and ~ 4th CE.; but wouldn’t be surprised when it had its origin in Cyprus.

Remarks: A rather rare drinking glass made from the characteristic greenish glass. A glass of which one can imagine it adorning the table of somebody with a good feeling for form, shape or better elegance.

Description: At the top of the waisted part of the cup is a single thread of glass which enhancing the shape. It seems that the free formed cup was shaped with a somewhat open base which opening has been closed off by the top of the attached foot. The foot of this glass makes it a rare glass. The conical foot has been widened to give a larger footing to provide more stability. The Cuppa has a form that makes one remotely think of a Carchesium. However, the total shape of the cup gives a much more elegant impression. Not that Carchesia are not elegant but the total form-language is, at least for us, more refined.

References: Up to now a good parallel has not been found. For the shape of the foot a parallel was found in the Corning collection being acc.nr. 66.1.264.

Provenance: -Gorny & Mosch auction nr. 136; – Ex collection PD; – Gorny & Mosch auction nr.259.

ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 10, 2021

RIBBED BOWL of Joop van der Groen

Roman Empire ǀ 50 BC / early 1st century AD Size: ↑ 5,6 cm; Ø 11,7 cm  ǀ Weight 178 gram

Technique: Cast, pinched and dropped on a mould; rotary-polished on the interior

Classification: Isings (1957) form 3b

Description: Thick hemispherical bowl in translucent light-green glass with a rounded and polished rim, slightly concave base.  Body adorned with 30 low rounded ribs with pronounced upper end that tapers downward and continue under the bottom. The interior of the bowl is rotary polished with true concentric lines.

Condition: Intact

Remark: Scientific research by Mark Taylor and David Hill indicated how this form ribbed bowl has been made.

Provenance: 2006-2010 P.E. Cuperus, Laren (the Netherlands), 2006 Gordian Weber, Koln (Germany)

References: Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum (Hayes, 1975), no. 46.

Shinning Vessels-Ancient Glass from Greek, Roman and Islamic Times (Fortuna Fine Arts Ltd New York 1991 no. 31.

Ancient glass and some Egyptian Antiquities-Dos en Bertie Winkel Collection (van Rossum, 2014) DOS 08

                                                                                                                       

GALLO-ROMAN BOTTLE WITH THREAD DECORATION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 4, 2021

Gallo-Roman Bottle with Thread Decoration

From

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

Date: 4th Century AD,  North France, possibly Alsace-Lorraine Size: ↑ 18.0 cm,  Ø 12.5 cm

Classification: Isings (1957), form 104b (variant)

Condition: Intact

Description: Free-blown transparent bottle of thin glass in light olive green shade with slightly squat spherical body. From the shoulders, the neck rises smoothly ending in a flared mouth. Just below the rim, a fine thread in the same color is applied with six turns. The same thread is also attached at the bottom of the neck on the shoulders (7x). Above the slightly concave bottom, with pontil-rest, a third thin wire is attached wider apart, just as with the neck twisted 6 times.

Reference: Historisches Museum Basel (5th Century)

%d bloggers like this: