Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 6, 2018

Photos and Suggested Post by  Hans van Rossum

Glass Pavilion Eretz Museum
The Eretz Israel Glass Pavilion is part of the Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv. The Pavilion takes the visitors on a unique journey through time, traveling back thousands of years to the earliest days of glassmaking. The exhibition is divided into three sections, representing three eras in the history of glass production: pre-blown glass (Late Bronze Age to Hellenistic period—15th-1st centuries BCE), blown glass of the Roman and Byzantine periods (1st–7th centuries CE); and blown glass of the Islamic period (7th–15th centuries CE). Two rare vessels on display are a delicate drinking horn with two openings, known by its Greek name “rhyton”, and “Ennion’s Blue Jug” bearing the signature of its maker, who lived in the first half of the 1st century CE. Most of the glass was donated from a private collection of Dr. Walter Moses, who founded the Eretz Israel Museum in 1958, this rare and beautiful assemblage of glass has been enhanced over the years by exciting new acquisitions and significant donations. Among the unique features are fragile relics of glass dating from biblical times, as well as some of the earliest blown glass discovered from the Roman period. One of the most impressive collections of Ancient (Roman) Glass of the world, exhibited in a fascinating architectural building. Link to Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv & link to Glass Pavilion

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on April 1, 2017

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION by  Hans van Rossum

Glass Pavilion Eretz Museum
The Eretz Israel Glass Pavilion is part of the Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv. The Pavilion takes the visitors on a unique journey through time, traveling back thousands of years to the earliest days of glassmaking. The exhibition is divided into three sections, representing three eras in the history of glass production: pre-blown glass (Late Bronze Age to Hellenistic period—15th-1st centuries BCE), blown glass of the Roman and Byzantine periods (1st–7th centuries CE); and blown glass of the Islamic period (7th–15th centuries CE). Two rare vessels on display are a delicate drinking horn with two openings, known by its Greek name “rhyton”, and “Ennion’s Blue Jug” bearing the signature of its maker, who lived in the first half of the 1st century CE. Most of the glass was donated from a private collection of Dr. Walter Moses, who founded the Eretz Israel Museum in 1958, this rare and beautiful assemblage of glass has been enhanced over the years by exciting new acquisitions and significant donations. Among the unique features are fragile relics of glass dating from biblical times, as well as some of the earliest blown glass discovered from the Roman period. One of the most impressive collections of Ancient (Roman) Glass of the world, exhibited in a fascinating architectural building. Link to Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv & link to Glass Pavilion

**THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION

Posted in by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 1, 2015

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION

Glass Pavilion Eretz Museum
The Eretz Israel Glass Pavilion is part of the Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv. The Pavilion takes the visitors on a unique journey through time, traveling back thousands of years to the earliest days of glassmaking. The exhibition is divided into three sections, representing three eras in the history of glass production: pre-blown glass (Late Bronze Age to Hellenistic period—15th-1st centuries BCE), blown glass of the Roman and Byzantine periods (1st–7th centuries CE); and blown glass of the Islamic period (7th–15th centuries CE). Two rare vessels on display are a delicate drinking horn with two openings, known by its Greek name “rhyton”, and “Ennion’s Blue Jug” bearing the signature of its maker, who lived in the first half of the 1st century CE. Most of the glass was donated from a private collection of Dr. Walter Moses, who founded the Eretz Israel Museum in 1958, this rare and beautiful assemblage of glass has been enhanced over the years by exciting new acquisitions and significant donations. Among the unique features are fragile relics of glass dating from biblical times, as well as some of the earliest blown glass discovered from the Roman period. One of the most impressive collections of Ancient (Roman) Glass of the world, exhibited in a fascinating architectural building. Link to Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv  & link to Glass Pavilion

 

 

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 1, 2012

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION of  Hans van Rossum

Glass Pavilion Eretz Museum
The Eretz Israel Glass Pavilion is part of the Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv. The Pavilion takes the visitors on a unique journey through time, traveling back thousands of years to the earliest days of glassmaking. The exhibition is divided into three sections, representing three eras in the history of glass production: pre-blown glass (Late Bronze Age to Hellenistic period—15th-1st centuries BCE), blown glass of the Roman and Byzantine periods (1st–7th centuries CE); and blown glass of the Islamic period (7th–15th centuries CE). Two rare vessels on display are a delicate drinking horn with two openings, known by its Greek name “rhyton”, and “Ennion’s Blue Jug” bearing the signature of its maker, who lived in the first half of the 1st century CE. Most of the glass was donated from a private collection of Dr. Walter Moses, who founded the Eretz Israel Museum in 1958, this rare and beautiful assemblage of glass has been enhanced over the years by exciting new acquisitions and significant donations. Among the unique features are fragile relics of glass dating from biblical times, as well as some of the earliest blown glass discovered from the Roman period. One of the most impressive collections of Ancient (Roman) Glass of the world, exhibited in a fascinating architectural building. Link to Eretz Museum in Tel Aviv & link to Glass Pavilion

MUSEUMS GLASS COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 14, 2017

The following pages are about Museums’ Glass Collections and Special Past Exhibitions at Museums with Glass. The museums are arranged by the countries they are in.  The links below will take you to our blog features – click on “active link”.

USA

THE YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

Highlights from Yale’s ancient glass collection.

ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS AT THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM(active link)

A wonderful ancient glass collection in the University Art Museum.

JERUSALEM 1000–1400: EVERY PEOPLE UNDER HEAVEN (active link)

Exhibition was at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

ROMAN GLASS FROM THE KOREAN KINGDOM OF SILLA (active link)

Exhibition was at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

NEWARK MUSEUM’S ANCIENT GLASS COLLECTION(active link)

This is Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass comprised of over 125 pieces of ancient glass from 1500 BC Egypt through Greece, Roman and the Islamic cultures through 1200 AD.

FIRE AND LIGHT EXHIBITION AT THE NEWARK MUSEUM (active link)

Exhibition was at The Newark Museum

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART (NEW YORK) (active link)

The following Departments with glass collections are listed:

American Wing

Byzantine and early European

Greek and Roman

Islamic Art

The Robert Lehman Collection, European glass from 15th -17th C

THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

American glass of the 19th and 20th century.

BROOKLYN MUSEUM (active link)

Roman glass collection at the Brooklyn Museum, New York

THE CLOISTERS MUSEUM AND GARDENS IN NORTHERN MANHATTAN (active link)

This museum is part of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and has medieval glass, art and architecture.

ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS AT THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM (active link)

 

“TIFFANY GLASS: PAINTING WITH COLOR AND LIGHT: ” AT LAFAYETTE COLLEGE (active link)

 

THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART, GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

 

THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART, GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

 

MEDIEVAL GLASS FOR POPES,PRINCES AND PEASANTS(active link)

Exhibition was at the Corning Museum of Glass

PAUL GETTY MUSEUM (active link)

The above link will take you both museums:

The Getty Villa in Malibu

The Getty Center in Los Angeles

ANCIENT GLASS FROM KARANIS A FIRST CENTURY GRECO-ROMAN TOWN IN EGYPT (active link)

Found in: The Kelsey Museum of Archaeology

THE SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART ROMAN, ROMAN GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

 

CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS (active link)

This museum has a large diverse collection of glass from ancient to modern in Corning, NY.

THE LEGION OF HONOR MUSEUM (active link)

The Legion of Honor is part of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. They have a fine glass collection of about 3,400 objects of which 114 are ancient Roman and Islamic.

United Kingdom

THE BRITISH MUSEUM: POST ROMAN AND MEROVINGIAN GLASS 5TH – 7TH C (active link)

 

THE VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

This museum has a large diverse collections of glass from ancient to modern.

THE FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM, CAMBRIDGE UK(active link)

Fitzwilliam Museum’s glass collection comprises over 1000 pieces from ancient to modern

MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE UK(active link)

The Museum holds archaeological finds from every part of the inhabited world. The glass collection is from ancient Roman through medieval and post-medieval. Some of the  finds are from sites within Cambridge.

France

PARIS AND NORTHERN FRANCE (active link)

The following Museum are on the above link:

The Musée de Picardie

The Louvre

The Musee d Archeologie Nationale

National Museum of the Renaissance

Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris France

Museum of Antiquities in Rouen

 

 

Germany

FRAGILE LUXURY at THE ROMAN-GERMANIC MUSEUM IN COLOGNE (active link)

A very large collection of Roman and later glass from the Cologne area.

THE HENTRICH GLASS MUSEUM (active link)

This museum in Düsseldorf, has a diverse collection of glass.

ROMAN MUSEUM IN ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL IN AUGSBURG, GERMANY (active link)

A small Roman glass collection found in situ.

 

 

Netherlands

ROMAN GLASS EXHIBITION IN HEERLEN HOLLAND (active link)

The Roman glass in this exhibition was from private collectors.

THE RIJKSMUSEUM IN AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS (active link)

Collections of Roemers, Wald Glass, and Facon de Venise glass from The Netherlands

 

 

Israel

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION (active link)

 

4. MUSEUMS GLASS COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS

Posted in by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 29, 2016

The following pages are about Museums’ Glass Collections and Special Past Exhibitions at Museums with Glass. The museums are arranged by the countries they are in.  The links below will take you to our blog features – click on “active link”.

USA

GLASS OF THE ARCHITECTS VIENNA, 1900-1937 (active link)

Highlights from a show at Corning Museum of Glass

THE YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

Highlights from Yale’s ancient glass collection.

ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS AT THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM(active link)

A wonderful ancient glass collection in the University Art Museum.

JERUSALEM 1000–1400: EVERY PEOPLE UNDER HEAVEN (active link)

Exhibition was at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

ROMAN GLASS FROM THE KOREAN KINGDOM OF SILLA (active link)

Exhibition was at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

NEWARK MUSEUM’S ANCIENT GLASS COLLECTION(active link)

This is Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass comprised of over 125 pieces of ancient glass from 1500 BC Egypt through Greece, Roman and the Islamic cultures through 1200 AD.

FIRE AND LIGHT EXHIBITION AT THE NEWARK MUSEUM (active link)

Exhibition was at The Newark Museum

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART (NEW YORK) (active link)

The following Departments with glass collections are listed:

American Wing

Byzantine and early European

Greek and Roman

Islamic Art

The Robert Lehman Collection, European glass from 15th -17th C

THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

American glass of the 19th and 20th century.

BROOKLYN MUSEUM (active link)

Roman glass collection at the Brooklyn Museum, New York

THE CLOISTERS MUSEUM AND GARDENS IN NORTHERN MANHATTAN (active link)

This museum is part of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and has medieval glass, art and architecture.

“TIFFANY GLASS: PAINTING WITH COLOR AND LIGHT: ” AT LAFAYETTE COLLEGE (active link)

 

THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART, GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

 

THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART, GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

 

MEDIEVAL GLASS FOR POPES,PRINCES AND PEASANTS(active link)

Exhibition was at the Corning Museum of Glass

PAUL GETTY MUSEUM (active link)

The above link will take you both museums:

The Getty Villa in Malibu

The Getty Center in Los Angeles

ANCIENT GLASS FROM KARANIS A FIRST CENTURY GRECO-ROMAN TOWN IN EGYPT (active link)

Found in: The Kelsey Museum of Archaeology

THE SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART ROMAN, ROMAN GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

 

CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS (active link)

This museum has a large diverse collection of glass from ancient to modern in Corning, NY.

THE LEGION OF HONOR MUSEUM (active link)

The Legion of Honor is part of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. They have a fine glass collection of about 3,400 objects of which 114 are ancient Roman and Islamic.

GLASS AT THE RISD MUSEUM (active link)

The department of Ancient Art includes bronze figural sculptures and vessels, an exceptional collection of Greek coins, stone sculpture, Greek vases, paintings, and mosaics, a fine collection of Roman jewelry and glass.

United Kingdom

THE BRITISH MUSEUM: POST ROMAN AND MEROVINGIAN GLASS 5TH – 7TH C (active link)

 

THE VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM GLASS COLLECTION (active link)

This museum has a large diverse collections of glass from ancient to modern.

THE FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM, CAMBRIDGE UK(active link)

Fitzwilliam Museum’s glass collection comprises over 1000 pieces from ancient to modern

MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE UK(active link)

The Museum holds archaeological finds from every part of the inhabited world. The glass collection is from ancient Roman through medieval and post-medieval. Some of the  finds are from sites within Cambridge.

France

PARIS AND NORTHERN FRANCE (active link)

The following Museum are on the above link:

The Musée de Picardie

The Louvre

The Musee d Archeologie Nationale

National Museum of the Renaissance

Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris France

Museum of Antiquities in Rouen

Germany

ANCIENT GLASS AT THE LVR-LANDES MUSEUM IN BONN (active link)

The LVR-LandesMuseum is the Rhineland’s only museum of cultural history.This museum has a wonderful collection of Roman and Medieval glass.

FRAGILE LUXURY at THE ROMAN-GERMANIC MUSEUM IN COLOGNE (active link)

A very large collection of Roman and later glass from the Cologne area.

THE HENTRICH GLASS MUSEUM (active link)

This museum in Düsseldorf, has a diverse collection of glass.

ROMAN MUSEUM IN ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL IN AUGSBURG, GERMANY (active link)

A small Roman glass collection found in situ.

Netherlands

GLASS THROUGH THE AGES

The glass in this show is from private collectors in Netherlands. This one of a kind show is in The Dordts Patrician House – Museum at the Meuse river

RIJKSMUSEUM VAN OUDHEDEN IN LEIDEN (active link)

ROMAN GLASS EXHIBITION IN HEERLEN HOLLAND (active link)

The Roman glass in this past exhibition was from private collectors.

THE RIJKSMUSEUM IN AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS (active link)

Collections of Roemers, Wald Glass, and Facon de Venise glass from The Netherlands

ALLARD PIERSON MUSEUM(active link)

The Allard Pierson Museum is the archaeological museum of the University of Amsterdam, NL.  Glass from many ancient civilizations.

Israel

THE ERETZ ISRAEL MUSEUM-GLASS PAVILION(active link

Belgium

ANCIENT GLASS AT THE GRAND CURTIUS MUSEUM IN LIEGE BELGIUM(active link)

 

 

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LATE ROMAN DOUBLE BALSAMARIUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 11, 2016

DOUBLE BALSAMARIUM of  Hans van Rossum

LATE ROMAN DOUBLE BALSAMARIUM

 4th – 5th century AD. Eastern Mediterranean, Syro-Palestinian area

 Size↑10.6 cm | ø 5.7 cm | Weight 58 g

 

Technique: Free blown, thread and handles applied, tooled

Description: Transparent bluish-green glass, two tubular phials, bulging in the middle of the bodies. Heavy rim folded outward and inward. Starting at the top a thin thread  wound anticlockwise with approximately eleven revolutions. Two small angular side-handles, applied on top of shoulder and attached to neck in a fold. Base flattened, the rough snapped off rest of the pontil makes this double balsamarium leans slightly forward.

view of base the LATER ROMAN DOUBLE BALSAMARIUM

See pontil mark above

Condition: Intact, iridescence and incrustation on the back and the inside

Remarks: Double balsamaria or Kohl tubes with two compartments were made by squeezing an elongated bubble in such a way that the sides touched lengthwise.  A shallow channel on one side of the finished vessel (the ”back”) corresponds to a deep cleavage on the other side (the ”front”). Apparently, ancient glass blowers pressed both sides simultaneously. This type is rare, only two identical examples are known. The way  in which the glass blower squeezed the glass bubble is very well visible.

Provenance: Ancient Resource LLC, Montrose CA, USA, auction 28 September 2013 lot 263, Ex Property from the Estate of Dr. Ivan Jeanne Weiler, Urbana, Illinois USA 1960s

Reference: Archaeological Center Tel Aviv, auction 46, 20 January 2010 lot 140, The Gershon Bineth Collection of Ancient Glass.Sotheby’s London, 13 -14 July 1981 lot 424 Eretz Israel Museum – the Glass Pavilion – Tel Aviv for an identical example

ROMAN GLASS SPRINKLER BOTTLE WITH TWO HANDLES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 5, 2018

SPRINKLER BOTTLE WITH TWO HANDLES of Hans van Rossum

Date: 4th century AD | Found: in the surrounding area of Sebaste (Samaria-Israel) Size: ↑12.5 cm | ø 7.5 cm | Weight 100 g

 

Technique: Body pattern-blown, neck and rim free blown; handles applied

Description: Transparent amber glass, pear-shaped body, cylindrical neck, tooled diaphragm with a hole at the base of the neck. Rim folded inward. Two looped handles of pale green glass, applied to the shoulder, drawn up and attached to edge of rim, snapped off. Body decorated with swirling ribs, curving from upper left to lower right. Indented base. Pontil mark.

Condition: Intact, some slightly incrustation

Provenance: Jerusalem art market, Jerusalem 2005

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen(active link) (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 159, 29 April – 28 August 2011

Reference: Eretz Israel Museum(active link) – the Glass Pavilion – Tel Aviv for an identical example in green glass

 

NARROW-NECKED JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 27, 2017

ROMAN NARROW-NECKED JUG of  Hans van Rossum

NARROW-NECKED JUG

NARROW-NECKED JUG

First half of 1st century AD | From a workshop in north Italy

Size↑13.6 cm | ø 9.3 cm | Weight 56 g

Technique: Free blown, handle applied; tooled
Classification: Isings 1957 form 14 (variant)
Description: Transparent pale green glass with handle of similar colored glass. Smooth transition to squat piriform body; rim widened and unworked; tall tubular neck; flattened base, slightly concave, no pontil mark. Angular ribbed handle with four narrow-set ribs, applied to lower neck, and attached to upper half of body; excess glass pulled down as a triangular tail, pressed against wall, and snapped off.
Condition: Intact, slightly incrustation. At the base a bubble (fault) that popped at the moment the glass blower blew this jug and flattened the base. Perfect condition.
Remarks: Narrow-necked jugs are among the earliest vessels luxury glass tableware. The shapes echo contemporaneous pottery jugs. The body is usually piriform, squat bulbous, or spherical, the neck tubular, the rim everted or folded. The elegant handles are made with great care and precision and show a great deal of variety. This jug represents a small group that was often made in marbled and threaded glass and may have emanated from one workshop. The vessels are characterized by an angular tail decorates the lower end. The body can be piriform, squat bulbous, or spherical; the base is flattened. The find spots are concentrated in north Italy. Most jugs are large enough to have served as wine or water jugs at table. One magnificent jug of amber and white marbled glass came to light in the vicinity of Milan, at Dello, in the tomb of an athlete. The Augustan date assigned to the rich burial, based on coins of Augustus (27 BCE-14 CE), is probably too early, but the context is consistent with a date before the mid first century. A few ”imitations,” without the triangular tail at the lower end of the handle, were found in Cyprus.’ (Stern 2001). Another remarkable fact is the way in which the glass blower applied the handle. In later periods he will first apply the handle on the shoulder, then drawn up to attach it to rim or neck. This early jug shows the opposite way. First applying to the neck, then drawn down to attach to the body.
Provenance: Kölner Münzkabinett, 22 May 2013 lot 636 Private collection Cologne, formed in the 1930s, thence by descent
Reference: Roman, Byzantine and Early Medieval Glass, Ernesto Wolf Collection, E. M. Stern no. 29
(H – 18.4 cm D – 12.05 cm W – 55 gr.) Eretz Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel inv. no. 57658 Vetri Antichi del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Aquileia, L. Mandruzzato and A. Marcante no. 149 (H 14.5 cm) and no. 150. (H 15.0 cm) Inv.nos. AQ12932 -AQ2005/4 I Vetri Romani, M. C. Calvi no. 3. Solid Liquid, Fortuna Fine Arts Ltd. no. 107 Allard Pierson (Archaeological) Museum, Amsterdam, inv. no. APM904

NARROW-NECKED JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 1, 2017

ROMAN NARROW-NECKED JUG of  Hans van Rossum

NARROW-NECKED JUG

NARROW-NECKED JUG

First half of 1st century AD | From a workshop in north Italy

Size↑13.6 cm | ø 9.3 cm | Weight 56 g

Technique: Free blown, handle applied; tooled
Classification: Isings 1957 form 14 (variant)
Description: Transparent pale green glass with handle of similar colored glass. Smooth transition to squat piriform body; rim widened and unworked; tall tubular neck; flattened base, slightly concave, no pontil mark. Angular ribbed handle with four narrow-set ribs, applied to lower neck, and attached to upper half of body; excess glass pulled down as a triangular tail, pressed against wall, and snapped off.
Condition: Intact, slightly incrustation. At the base a bubble (fault) that popped at the moment the glass blower blew this jug and flattened the base. Perfect condition.
Remarks: Narrow-necked jugs are among the earliest vessels luxury glass tableware. The shapes echo contemporaneous pottery jugs. The body is usually piriform, squat bulbous, or spherical, the neck tubular, the rim everted or folded. The elegant handles are made with great care and precision and show a great deal of variety. This jug represents a small group that was often made in marbled and threaded glass and may have emanated from one workshop. The vessels are characterized by an angular tail decorates the lower end. The body can be piriform, squat bulbous, or spherical; the base is flattened. The find spots are concentrated in north Italy. Most jugs are large enough to have served as wine or water jugs at table. One magnificent jug of amber and white marbled glass came to light in the vicinity of Milan, at Dello, in the tomb of an athlete. The Augustan date assigned to the rich burial, based on coins of Augustus (27 BCE-14 CE), is probably too early, but the context is consistent with a date before the mid first century. A few ”imitations,” without the triangular tail at the lower end of the handle, were found in Cyprus.’ (Stern 2001). Another remarkable fact is the way in which the glass blower applied the handle. In later periods he will first apply the handle on the shoulder, then drawn up to attach it to rim or neck. This early jug shows the opposite way. First applying to the neck, then drawn down to attach to the body.
Provenance: Kölner Münzkabinett, 22 May 2013 lot 636 Private collection Cologne, formed in the 1930s, thence by descent
Reference: Roman, Byzantine and Early Medieval Glass, Ernesto Wolf Collection, E. M. Stern no. 29
(H – 18.4 cm D – 12.05 cm W – 55 gr.) Eretz Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel inv. no. 57658 Vetri Antichi del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Aquileia, L. Mandruzzato and A. Marcante no. 149 (H 14.5 cm) and no. 150. (H 15.0 cm) Inv.nos. AQ12932 -AQ2005/4 I Vetri Romani, M. C. Calvi no. 3. Solid Liquid, Fortuna Fine Arts Ltd. no. 107 Allard Pierson (Archaeological) Museum, Amsterdam, inv. no. APM904

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