Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

NEWARK MUSEUM’S ANCIENT GLASS COLLECTION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 17, 2016

The Newark Museum, established as the largest New Jersey museum, invites you to enjoy unforgettable experiences in the arts and natural sciences.  Take an inspirational journey through 80 galleries of world-class collections including American, Asian, African and Classical. Part of the Museum is the Ballantine House, a Victorian mansion built in 1885. The Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass installation is comprised of over 125 pieces of ancient glass from 1500 BC Egypt through Greece, Roman and the Islamic cultures through 1200 AD. Also included are three pictures of American glass from the Ballantine House. Click on the following pictures to enlarge them.

** NEWARK MUSEUM’S ANCIENT GLASS COLLECTION

Posted in by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 24, 2011

The Newark Museum, established as the largest New Jersey museum, invites you to enjoy unforgettable experiences in the arts and natural sciences.  Take an inspirational journey through 80 galleries of world-class collections including American, Asian, African and Classical. Part of the Museum is the Ballantine House, a Victorian mansion built in 1885. The Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass installation is comprised of over 125 pieces of ancient glass from 1500 BC Egypt through Greece, Roman and the Islamic cultures through 1200 AD. Also included are three pictures of American glass from the Ballantine House. Click on the following pictures to enlarge them.

**FIRE AND LIGHT EXHIBITION AT THE NEWARK MUSEUM

Posted in by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 11, 2010

NEWARK, N.J. – The exhibition “Fire and Light: 3000 Years of Glass Artistry” opened on August 15, 2001 at The Newark Museum. The exhibit, comprised of more than 100 objects, pairs pieces from the museum’s own renowned Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass with those of three private collectors – the Allaire collection, the Schefler collection and the Simon collection – and will be on view until January 20, 2002.

“Fire and Light” has been designed to coincide with the unveiling of the reinstallation of The Newark Museum’s own internationally known Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass.

“Fire and Light” includes items from ancient Rome, Syria and Egypt, as well as glass objects created in Europe and the United States from the 1500s through the present. The exhibit follows the use of glass from its beginnings as a rare and magical medium in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, through the colorful perfume containers of ancient Greece, to its mass production under the Romans.

Ancient Roman sculpture, pottery and metalwork is displayed to show other aspects of Roman daily life. Glass in jewelry and women’s vanity items is also shown, as is the mystery of the wondrous iridescence of ancient glass, which fascinated American glassmakers such as Louis Comfort Tiffany. Video installations offer clips of master glassmaker Bill Gudenrath demonstrating ancient techniques for working the challenging medium of glass.

Individual pieces include a Frankish cone beaker courtesy of the Allaire collection and a rare glass bust of a goddess from the Schefler collection. The bust, dating from the Second and Third Century AD, is of special importance, as glass sculptures of the human figure rarely survived from antiquity.

From the collection of Ellen and Don Simon, there is a tall-necked perfume bottle, with its original contents sealed inside. Pieces from Dale Chihuly and Toots Zynsky represent the modern faces of glass artistry and vividly portray the numerous advances made in the field.

The Eugene Schaefer collection of ancient glass installation is comprised of over 125 pieces of ancient glass from 1500 BC Egypt through Greece, Roman and the Islamic cultures through 1200 AD.

“The new gallery will more effectively place these objects in their cultural and historic context,” says Susan H. Auth, an ancient glass scholar and curator of the museum’s classical collections.

Ulysses Dietz, curator of decorative arts from The Newark Museum, and Susan Auth, curator of the classical collection at The Newark Museum, are the project directors for this exhibition.

The Newark Museum, located at 49 Washington Street in the downtown/arts district.

On the Web at: http://www.newarkmuseum.org/

Hours are Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 pm; Thursday from noon to 8:30 pm. For information or directions, call 800-7-MUSEUM.

by: Antiques and the Arts Editorial Content

The following objects from the Allaire Collection Glass were in the show.

52e Frankish goblet 5-7th century

51e Frankish beaker 5-7th century

50r Pilgrim flash 3-4th century

49E Maigelin 1470-1520

45r green trailed jar 3-4th-century

43R Sidonian Bottle with Scoll Design 1st century

24r double balsamarium 4-5th century

22r zig zag jar 4-5th century

38r Islamic lamp 11th century

31e Roemer late 17th century

30r cast ribbed bowl 1st century BC

28r swirled sprinkler flask 4th century

16R Aubergene Jar 4-5th Century

Roman Glass Beaker with Iridescence

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 26, 2019

 02R Roman Beaker With Wheel-cut Lines of Allaire Collection

Remark: The simple shape of this vessel resembles our modern drinking glasses. It is pale blue/green with iridescence. The exterior is decorated with faint wheel cut bands: three parallel lines around the center, one band near the base. This beaker has a ground rim and flattened base. The  beauty of this cup is in the natural iridescence which has formed on it.  Beaker is intact. 

Date: First Century A.D. H: 9.3 cm. Rim D: 6.5 cm. Cf. Auth 1976 #368 (The Newark Museum)

Iridescent Glass

Iris, the Greek goddess of the rainbow, lends her name to the word iridescence a lustrous, rainbow-like play of color. Iridescence was admired by modern glassmakers but was not an intentional effect made by ancient artisans. The effect was found on pieces of ancient glass where burial conditions caused alkali (soluble salt) to leach from the glass and form layers that eventually separate and flake off. The remaining surface layers reflect light differently, resulting in an iridescent appearance.  WHAT IS THE IRIDESCENCE ON ANCIENT GLASS ?

THIS IS OUR GLASS STUDY GALLERY

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 21, 2019

This is the glass study gallery for our main site Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection. It is for people who are interested in going deeper into the study of the great collections of ancient and other antique glass found in museums.  This study gallery is thumbnail photographs taken of glass on public view both in the USA and abroad. Click on the list of collections below to go to these pages.

**GLASS AT THE GETTY VILLA IN MALIBU

** THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, GLASS IN THE AMERICAN WING

** THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM’S ROMAN GLASS COLLECTIONS 2010

**GLASS at THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART

**GLASS at THE MUSEUM of ANTIQUITIES in ROUEN FRANCE

**GLASS AT MUSÉE DES ARTS DÉCORATIFS IN PARIS FRANCE

** FRENCH, VENETIAN AND FACON DE VENISE GLASS AT THE LOUVRE

**ROMAN GLASS AT THE LOUVRE

** GLASS AT ST GERMAIN, ARCHEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

** NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE RENAISSANCE IN FRANCE

** THE MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY IN SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE

** GLASS AT MUSEE DE PICARDIE (AMIENS)

**THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY

**CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS STUDY GALLERY

**THE ROMAN-GERMANIC MUSEUM IN COLOGNE

**1785-1858 A PIECE OF EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN HISTORY AS SEEN THROUGH GLASS

**JAMES PETER ALLAIRE

Below is a link to additional glass collections and exhibitions on this web site

4. MUSEUMS GLASS COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS

**THE STUDY GALLERY IS USED FOR BLOG STORAGE

Posted in by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 20, 2019

10. THE STUDY GALLERY IS USED FOR BLOG STORAGE

Posted in by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 20, 2019

 

This is our glass study gallery for our site Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection. It is for people who are interested in going deeper into the study of the great collections of ancient glass found in museums and private collections.  This study gallery is thumbnail photographs taken of glass on public view both in the USA and abroad. Click on the list of collections below to go to these pages.

**GLASS AT THE GETTY VILLA IN MALIBU

** THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, GLASS IN THE AMERICAN WING

** THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM’S ROMAN GLASS COLLECTIONS 2010

**GLASS at THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART

**GLASS at THE MUSEUM of ANTIQUITIES in ROUEN FRANCE

**GLASS AT MUSÉE DES ARTS DÉCORATIFS IN PARIS FRANCE

** FRENCH, VENETIAN AND FACON DE VENISE GLASS AT THE LOUVRE

**ROMAN GLASS AT THE LOUVRE

** GLASS AT ST GERMAIN, ARCHEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

** NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE RENAISSANCE IN FRANCE

** THE MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY IN SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE

** GLASS AT MUSEE DE PICARDIE (AMIENS)

**THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY

**CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS STUDY GALLERY

**THE ROMAN-GERMANIC MUSEUM IN COLOGNE

**1785-1858 A PIECE OF EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN HISTORY AS SEEN THROUGH GLASS

**JAMES PETER ALLAIRE

FOUR PERSIAN GLASS UNGUENTARIA

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 18, 2019

FOUR PERSIAN GLASS UNGUENTARIA

OF The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

Name FOUR PERSIAN GLASS UNGUENTARIA also called: ‘MOLAR FLASKS’

Date: of Islamic era, 9th.-10th. Century A.D.

From:Mesopotamia, Persia, possibly from Fustat, Egypt*

Size: left to right:

a. ↑ 5.51 cm | Ø body: 1.71 cm | Ø mouth : 1.11 cm | Ø base: 1.55 cm| w: 19 g |

b.↑ 6.29 cm | Ø body: 2.19 cm | Ø mouth : 1.32 cm | Ø base: 1.69 cm| w: 19 g |

c. ↑ 5.65 cm | Ø body: 2.09 cm | Ø mouth : 1.05 cm | Ø base: 1.85cm| w: 23 g |

d. ↑ 7.35 cm | Ø body: 2.29 cm | Ø mouth : 1.55 cm | Ø base: 1.90cm| w: 20 g |

 Technique: All four bottles cast as solid blocks of glass, drilled out, then cut with a grinding wheel and polished to form a container or unguentarium for precious perfume or scented oil.

Description: Four bottles of light green glass, that all have square, four sided bodies with hexagonal necks, three of them with four tapering or pyramid-shaped feet at each corner. Decorations on neck and bodies, each with different triangle- and square formed plastic elements, created with a grinding wheel. Glasses a, b and d have tapering necks from the rim towards the body. All four rims are plain.

Condition: In fairly good condition, but weathered, glasses  b and d bear heavy, colorfull iridescence; unguentarium c has lost its feet all together.

Remarks:  Two of the small bottles were carved from green glass, the other two possibly also; cut in a popular shape for cosmetic containers used in medieval Egypt, commonly in modern times referred to as ‘molar flasks’, for the vessels shape is thought to resemble a tooth. The four feet function as a pedestal to the flasks, that could have contained cosmetic unguent and perfume or possibly kohl for eyelining.

  1. S. Auth remarks about the example in the Newark Museum (50.1814), that ‘from their shape, they were probably made as imitations of rock crystal’. The pale green colour of two of the four presented in the Augustinus collection, do resemble crystal indeed or at least chiselled translucent rockstone.

* C.J. Lamm describes in his Glass from Iran (1929/1930/1935), that the ‘molar flasks’ were produced in Egypt because of Egypts renown skills for cutting crystal rock. S. Auth and D. Whitehouse think this idea to be doubtfull, because most of the examples brought to light come from places spread throughout medieval Persia, several from a period of time earlier than the 9th. century A.D.

Provenance: From a private dutch collection; previously unpublished.

Reference: Kelsey Museum of Archeology, 1968.2.13; Corning Museum of Glass: Glass of the Sultans, gift of the Fustat Expedition no: 69.1.42.; Kerstner-Museum Hannover, 1982, no: 156; Fremersdorf, cat. of the Vatikan, no: 912f; La Baume, coll. Loeffler no: 2015.

Literature: C.J.Lamm, Glass from Iran, 1935; Carboni and Whitehouse, Glass of the Sultans , 2001; Fustat Glass of the Early Islamic Period, 2001; Islamic Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass. Vol. 1, 2010.

ROMAN GLASS BEAKER FROM THE RHINELAND

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 10, 2019

 

 ROMAN GLASS BEAKER of  The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

Date: 4-6th C Size: ↑ 9.4 cm | Ø Mouth : 10.3 cm | Ø Base: 5.3cm | Weight: 143 g |

A Kisa: form 380, Gallo-Roman era

Technique: Probably blown into a mold, rim knocked off and slightly polished, wheel engraved line

Description: Translucent white to yellow-green, rather thin, glass, weathered and with golden irisation on the inside and outside, sand encrusted; two wheel-engraved lines, one at 0.41 cm from the mouth, second one at 3.44 cm from below; bottom indented to create a standing ring; with traces of a possible pontil mark.

Condition: Delivered in complete and uncleaned condition, with no cracks, but sand encrusted and with a very fine layer of a golden irisation allover.

Remarks: A close parallel is a beaker from the collection of Louis Gabriel Bellon (1819-1899) inventory number 575*, height 8 cm, with a similar shape and mouth, also translucent in color and with wheel-engraved lines.

Fremersdorf presents in Die Farblose Glaeser der Fruehzeit in Koeln (1957) a beaker with a height of 12,5 cm and a diameter at the mouth of 11,8 cm, wheel cut lines and a form of shape of the cup ending almost straight at the mouth, as is the case with the example in the Augustinus collection.

Susan H. Auth states in Ancient Glass at the Newark Museum about a colorless – blue green cup, (50.1873) of the 3rd. century and found in Cologne: ‘probably the simplest shape of drinking vessel with flattened base and knocked off rim, that could have been quickly produced by Roman glass shops’. However she does not mention the possibility of blowing the beakers into a mold. Isings describes in Roman Glass from dated finds (1957) similar cups from the third century, but with slightly outsplayed rim, as does the french writer Sennequier in Verreries Antiques, where profile drawings of the cups and beakers of the Gallo-Roman era do variate at the mouth from widely outsplayed to almost straight.

Reference: *Collection of L.G. Bellon, sale-catalogue 2009, no 205.

Kisa, slight variation in form to no: 380; Fremersdorf, 1957, vol. XIX, p. 7, inv. No 6004; Isings variation to form: 29, 3rd. c. A.D.;  Auth, 1976, Ancient Glass at the Newark Museum nr. 50.1873  Goethert-Polaschek, 1977, 72, nr 302, Taf. 42; Sennequier, Verreries Antiques, no 298, p 110-112.

Provenance: From a private dutch collection, previously unpublished;

Roman Glass Marbled Pear Shaped Bottle

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 5, 2018

54R Allaire Collection (active link)

Date: First Century Height: 5.6 cm

 

This beautiful flask is made of cobalt blue and opaque white glass made to imitate marble. The form is pear shaped.

 

Ref: The Newark Museum,(active link) picture# 49 in Auth-Ancient Glass at the Newark Museum, Susan Auth, 1976

%d bloggers like this: