Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

Glass Codd Bottle from Guyana

Posted in 1. American Glass, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 16, 2014

Codd Bottle

This bottle has a cylindrical shape with a flat base and a Codd stopper inside. It is embossed with the words: Demerara Ice House, Proprietors D’Aguiar Bros and a trade mark of a hand with a heart on it. Demerara Ice House Hotel, is located in Georgetown, Guyana, and was purchased by the D’Aguiar Brothers around 1907. It is called a Codd Bottle because of this type of closure in the neck. Hiram Codd, an English engineer in 1872, patented a bottle filled under gas pressure which pushed a marble against a rubber washer in the neck, creating a perfect seal. It was mainly used for mineral effervescent water.
H: 9 inches
D: 1907 or later

Glass Codd Bottle 88A

Glass Codd Bottle 88A

Ivory and Green Jade Colored Steuben Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, ALLAIRE COLLECTION OF GLASS, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 25, 2014

Ivory Jade Colored Steuben Glass Vase

The Ivory Jade color was developed in the 1920s by Carder for the Steuben Glass Co. It is a warm cream color in translucent glass. This beautiful vase was personally signed F. Carder.

H: 5 ¼ inches
D: c. 1920s

78A Steuben ivory jade colored glass vase

78A Steuben ivory jade colored glass vase

 

Green Jade Colored Steuben Glass Bowl

The Green Jade color was developed in the 1920s by Carder for the Steuben Glass Co. This bowl is a light green color on a white foot made in translucent glass.

H: 2 ½ inches
D: c. 1920s

79A Steuben green jade colored glass bowl

Jade Colors of Steuben Glass

In the 1920s, Carder developed colorful types of glass that were neither transparent nor opaque. These translucent Jade pieces were made in light and dark blue, green, and other colors. They were used extensively in the production of acid-etched pieces and tableware. Rosaline, which is usually considered a Jade glass, and the other Jades were often combined with off-white glass and decorated with engraving or etching. Ivory, a warm cream-colored glass is classified as a Jade. Below are examples of Steuben Ivory Jade and Green Jade glass.

Steuben glass ivory Jade color

Steuben glass ivory Jade color

 

Steuben green jade glass

Steuben green jade glass

Pictures from the Steuben Galleries at Corning Museum of Glass

American Pattern-Molded Bottles and Flasks

Posted in 1. American Glass, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 6, 2014

American Pattern-Molded Bottles and Flasks

American bottles and flasks with pattern-molded designs have been produced from 1765 on. This same type has been made for centuries in Europe and England. A flask is a bottle, which has been flatten so it fits into a jacket pocket and also called a pocket bottle. The pattern-molded bottles and flasks were blown from a single gather of glass, patterned in either rib molds or pattern piece-molds having a simple (diamond pattern) or more elaborate designs. The Pitkin-type flask is part of this group and made by the half-post method and ornamented by pattern-molded ribbings. Both flasks can look alike; however the Pitkin flasks has a tell-tail ring of thicker glass around the neck (post) from the second dip of the half-post method. The examples below are from the Allaire Collection.

 

 

Anna’s Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 9, 2012

This example is a popular commemorative glass from the Victorian Era with the date of 1899, city Asbury Park (NJ), and name. There are many glasses like this with different place, dates, and names. This one is important to me because my Grandfather at age 23 gave it to his new bride Anna.

H: 3 ½ inches

D: 1899

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Fry Tea Pot with Jade Trim

Posted in 1. American Glass, ALLAIRE COLLECTION OF GLASS, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 2, 2011

This heat resistant glass tea pot was made by H. C. Fry Glass Company in Rochester, PA. This company made complete dinner sets, tea sets and a large variety of heat-resistant oven glassware from 1916 to 1930 under a license from the Corning Glass Works.

 

H: 7 inches

1916-1930

66A Fry Tea Pot with Jade Trim

FIRE GRENADE BOTTLE

Posted in 1. American Glass, ALLAIRE COLLECTION OF GLASS, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 15, 2010

This is a fire grenade made by the General Fire Extinguisher Co. in NY and was called the Harkness Fire Destroyer (1871-1892). A fire grenade is a fire extinguisher in a glass bottle. Containers like this one held liquid chemicals and were thrown at the base of the fire so the bottle would smash and release the chemicals, putting out the fire. This dark blue bottle still contains the extinguishing fluid of an unknown composition. Early ones used salt-water, and ones made after 1910 used mainly carbon-tetrachloride which was inexpensive and effective. After 1950 carbon-tetrachloride could no longer be used in glass fire grenades because of its chemical toxicity. Exposure to high concentrations of this damages the nervous system and internal organs. Additionally, when used on a fire, the heat can convert CTC to Phosgene gas, formerly used as a chemical weapon in World War One.

H: 6 ½ inches
1871-1892

22a Fire Grenada Bottle

DOCTOR’S KIT BOTTLE, American Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, ALLAIRE COLLECTION OF GLASS, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 14, 2009

32A  DOCTOR’S KIT BOTTLE, American

H: 6 1/4 inches

C: 19th

Doctor’s Kit Bottle A32

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