Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 9, 2017

English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

                97E-A English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

Remark: This green wine has a cup-shaped bowl, set on knop with three raspberry prunts, above a clear stem enclosing a double-series opaque-twist and domed foot.

H: 15cm

c. 1765

English Green Opaque Twist Wine

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 8, 2017

English Green Opaque Twist Wine

97E-B English Green White Twist Wine

                                                                 97E-B English Green White Twist Wine

Remark: This green wine has a cup-shaped bowl, set on a knop with three raspberry prunts, above a clear glass stem enclosing a double-series opaque-twist and domed foot.
H: 15cm
D: 1765
Ref: Bonhams Nov. 30, 2011 #120, Bonhams Dec. 17, 2008 # 286,
Bickerton # 1155

SINGLE KUTTROLF FROM THE MIDDLE AGES

Posted in 3. European Glass, Medieval Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 7, 2017

A Rare Single Kuttrolf

120E Single Kuttrolf

120E Single Kuttrolf

Remarks: The Kuttrolf, mainly from Germany in the 16th C, is a beaker commonly found with several glass tubes, sometimes twisted, forming the neck having a cup-like upper container.  The example here represents a variant with a single open neck. The lower part of this beaker has a pushed in base and pontil mark.

Condition: broken and repaired

H: 18 cm

D: C. 1560

Ref: Christies Interiors, Sept. 2013 Lot # 199, Henkes, Glass Without Gloss, 1994, #27.2, Baumgartner, Phoenix aus Sand and Asche, 1988 #383, Baumgartner, Amend Collection, 2005, #64,65 (double)

Provenance: Collection of E. Martin Wunsch

Enameled Roemer (Ray’s Roemer)

Posted in 3. European Glass, Bohemian Glass, Enameled Glass, Roemers by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 26, 2017

Enameled Roemer (Ray’s Roemer)

This Victorian enameled roemer was made in Europe and possibly decorated by the Bohemian glass-worker and designer Kolo L. Moser. It was given to us by a dear friend.

H: 4 ½ inches

1890-1910

57E Enamelled Roemer

Tagged with: ,

ROMAN GREEN GLASS PITCHER WITH TREFOIL MOUTH

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 19, 2017

Green trefoil mouth pitcher

This is a Roman glass pitcher with a pear-shaped body tapering into a slender neck with contrasting dark green coil.  The mouth is a trefoil shape with applied coil and the foot is tooled and splayed.

H: 12.5 cm

Fourth Century

Stern # 92, 94, Hermitage # 388 Ill. 195

53R Green Trefoil Mouth Pitcher

Ivory and Green Jade Colored Steuben Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 7, 2017

Ivory Jade Colored Steuben Glass Vase

The Ivory Jade color was developed in the 1920s by Carder for the Steuben Glass Co. It is a warm cream color in translucent glass. This beautiful vase was personally signed F. Carder.

H: 5 ¼ inches
D: c. 1920s

78A Steuben ivory jade colored glass vase

78A Steuben ivory jade colored glass vase

 

Green Jade Colored Steuben Glass Bowl

The Green Jade color was developed in the 1920s by Carder for the Steuben Glass Co. This bowl is a light green color on a white foot made in translucent glass.

H: 2 ½ inches
D: c. 1920s

79A Steuben green jade colored glass bowl

Jade Colors of Steuben Glass

In the 1920s, Carder developed colorful types of glass that were neither transparent nor opaque. These translucent Jade pieces were made in light and dark blue, green, and other colors. They were used extensively in the production of acid-etched pieces and tableware. Rosaline, which is usually considered a Jade glass, and the other Jades were often combined with off-white glass and decorated with engraving or etching. Ivory, a warm cream-colored glass is classified as a Jade. Below are examples of Steuben Ivory Jade and Green Jade glass.

Steuben glass ivory Jade color

Steuben glass ivory Jade color

 

Steuben green jade glass

Steuben green jade glass

Pictures from the Steuben Galleries at Corning Museum of Glass

VENETIAN SALVIATI GOBLET

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Salviati Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 7, 2017

VENETIAN SALVIATI GOBLET

Salviati is a family and a group of companies. They were glass makers and mosaicists who worked and sold their products in the cities of Murano, Venice and London.The firms were Salviati, Jesuram & Co., Venice and Murano Glass and Mosaic Co., Pauly&Co and today Arc International. The founder was Antonio Salviati.One of the most important family members was Giulio Salviati (1843-1898).

A good book on this very collectable glass is: Venetian Glass of the 1890’s: Salviati at Stanford University by Carol M. Osborne

The provenance of the Salviati goblet pictured is the Carder Collection.Fredrick Carder managed the Steuben Glass Works in Corning NY and developed many of their early designs and glass formulas.

H: 9 ¾ inches

19th C

1e-venetian-salviate-goblet

01E Venetian Salviati Goblet

American Pattern-Molded Bottles and Flasks

Posted in 1. American Glass, Later American Glass after 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 5, 2017

American Pattern-Molded Bottles and Flasks

American bottles and flasks with pattern-molded designs have been produced from 1765 on. This same type has been made for centuries in Europe and England. A flask is a bottle, which has been flatten so it fits into a jacket pocket and also called a pocket bottle. The pattern-molded bottles and flasks were blown from a single gather of glass, patterned in either rib molds or pattern piece-molds having a simple (diamond pattern) or more elaborate designs. The Pitkin-type flask is part of this group and made by the half-post method and ornamented by pattern-molded ribbings. Both flasks can look alike; however the Pitkin flasks has a tell-tail ring of thicker glass around the neck (post) from the second dip of the half-post method. The examples below are from the Allaire Collection.

 

 

Pitkin Flask, Early American Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 3, 2017

The American Pitkin Flask

Pitkin Flask: Small bottle of green glass in an ovoid and flattened shape made by the “Half-Post Method”. In this method a gather of glass called a post is put back in the POT and a second gather is put on it so it covers about half of the post. It is then put in a vertical ribbed pattern mold and partly expanded and removed from the mold then swirled right or left. Also there are types in which the ribs are left it the vertical position. In the case of the popcorn Pitkin it is put in the mold a second time vertical ribs are put over swirled ribs call a broken swirl double pattern. Then the flask is expanded to the ovoid and flattened shape.

Originally these flasks were made in The Pitkin Glass Works in Manchester,CT (1788-1830).They were made later in other parts of New England and in the Midwest (e. g. Zanesville, Ohio 1810-1830).Today they are classified as being New England Pitkins or Midwestern Pitkins. You can usually tell the difference by counting the ribs. The New England is 36 ribs and Midwestern 16 ribs. In addition to various shades of green they can be found in amber, blue (rare), amethyst (rare) and colorless glass. The flask came in two main sizes half pint and pint, used as a pocket flask for whiskey.

Ref: Spillman II #46

pitkins Rear row A8MW A39MW A7NE Front row A19MW A43NE

Front row A 19, A 43, Rear row A8, A39, A7


A Pair Of Early English Gin Glasses

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 2, 2017

Early English Gin Glasses (Pair)

This pair of small English glasses was probably used for drinking gin based on their size. They have a drawn trumpet bowl, solid stem and folded foot and are almost identical except for a variation in height.

H: 4 & 4 ½ inches

D: 18th Century

Ref: Bickerton #344, #385

64E Pair of Early English Gin Glasses

64E Pair of Early English Gin Glasses

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