Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

Roman Honey-Colored Trailed Jar

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 13, 2018

37R Roman Honey-Colored Trailed Jar H: 8.5 cm Fourth Century

 

Remarks: This symmetrical honey-colored jar was used for storage.  It has a thin self trailing wound around the body with a folded collar-like rim.

Ref: Field Museum (Chicago) #87

Roman Glass Candlestick Balsamarium

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 8, 2018

Candlestick Balsamarium 36R

This is a utilitarian bottle from the second century with beautiful iridescence over the entire piece of glass. This vessel, used for perfume, was designed with a long neck inhibiting evaporation of the precious liquid within.

H: 14 cm

Second to Third Century

Ref: Cf. Yale #169

Roman Trefoil-Mouth Pitcher with Blue Handle

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 7, 2018

The thinly-blown glass of this small vessel demonstrates the skill of a First Century craftsman.  The spherical body rests on a pad foot and the graceful neck is accented by a trefoil-shaped mouth.  A trailed-on handle of opaque blue glass emphasizes the overall delicacy of this piece.

H: 11.5 cm

First Century

35R Trefoil-mouth Pitcher

JULY 4, 1776, INDEPENDENCE DAY

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 4, 2018

On July 4, 1776, the thirteen colonies claimed their independence from England, an event which eventually led to the formation of the United States.  What was the most common type of glass bottle in the colonies at that time ?

 

American Chestnut Bottle

Free blown American chestnut bottles were made in great quantities by most of the early glass shops from about 1750 to 1850. They were mostly made of the natural color of glass which is different shades green to brown. The name chestnut is based on the bulbous and flattened shape. The bottles typically are 4 to 9 inches however some are as small as 2 inches and large as demijohns and carboys. Similar chestnut flasks were made in Germany in the 18th-19th century. Ref: Kechum p. 5,11, McKearin Plate 225, Spillman II #45

The three examples from the Allaire collections are:

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8"

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8″

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8″

This is a dark olive green American chestnut bottle with pushed-up base.  Plain applied lip.

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

This free blown American chestnut bottle is olive green with pushed-up base and plain applied lip.

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

This light olive green American chestnut bottle has a high kick and plain applied lip.

Roman Dark Green Glass Bowl

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Islamic Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 27, 2018

34R Small Islamic Green Glass Dish or bowl

34R Small Roman Green Glass Dish or bowl H: 3.5 cm Fourth Century or later

Remarks:This is a palm size dish or bowl may have had a lid.  It is made of thickly blown dark green glass with many trapped air bubbles. It is late Roman or Islamic.

Small Hexagonal Roman Glass Bottle

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 25, 2018

R33 Date: Second to Third Century  H: 9 cm

 

Remark: The olive-green color of this hexagonal bottle and its diminutive size make it an unusual example.  Probably made in the Second or Third Century, it differs from the later Byzantine t ypes by its thinly blown sides and precise mold markings on the bottom.  The base of the vessel is molded in relief with six spokes radiating from a central boss, each termination with a raised dot.  It has been suggested that this type may have been made in the Western Provinces

 

 

Crystal Glass Small Spirit Carafe

Posted in CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 24, 2018

Crystal Glass Small Spirit Carafe

This is an Arts & Crafts small spirit carafe. It is made of fine leaded glass in a clean and pleasing shape. The carafe was made by Powell & Sons (Whitefriars) Ltd in, England. In 1834 James Powell (1774–1840), purchased the Whitefriars Glass Company, a small glassworks off Fleet Street in London, believed to have been established in 1680. The company, mainly known for manufacturing stained glass windows, provided glass to other stained glass firms and a wide range of other handmade glassware. The Whitefriars Co. closed in 1980.

H: 5 ¼ inches
D: 1880

118E Arts & Crafts small spirit carafe

118E Arts & Crafts small spirit carafe

Merovingian Glass Bell Beaker

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Merovingian Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 17, 2018

Merovingian Glass Bell Beaker

This Merovingian bell beaker is made of light yellow-green glass. It has a rounded and broad bottom and outward and upwardly flaring profile to the plain rim. Distinct pattern molded vertical ribs are noticeable on the body. Intact, with areas of encrustation and iridescent highlights. Ex. Martin Wunsch collection, NY

H: 10.3 cm
D: 6th Century AD
Ref: David Whitehouse, Roman Glass in Corning Museum of Glass, volume 2 # 614 P. 116-117, E. Marianne Stern, Roman, Byzantine, and early Medieval Glass 10 BCE- 700 CE.,#198

117E Merovingian trailed bell beaker

117E Merovingian bell beaker

Single-Handled Roman Glass Pitcher

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 15, 2018

31R Single Handled Pitcher

Remark:The natural colored blue-green glass used on this delicate pitcher has virtually no weathered and appears as it would have looked just after being manufactured in the First Century.  The simple ovoid body is accented by a ring base.  The precise handle is beautifully executed with thin ribs and double fold-over at the mouth.

Hight: 13 cm

Date:First Century

Ref: Ancient Collection De Monsieur D Auction Paris 1985 #477 & 478, Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, Nina Kunina, 1997 #143

HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 11, 2018

30R Date: Late First Century B.C. to Mid First Century A.D.  Hight: 13 cm

 

Remarks:This is a earlier Roman ribbed bowl was probably not made by direct cast and slumping method.  It may have been formed from a thick round disk. The ribs were formed hot with a pincer tool and then the disk was slumped into a bowl shape. The process is described in this link Ribbed Bowls and their Manufacture by Mark Taylor and David Hill. It is a class of bowls from the from the Eastern Mediterranean area with short, close-set ribs concentrated around the middle of the body.  For the most part, such bowls are naturally colored, either bluish-green or light green, or intentionally decolorized. Small percentage occurs in cobalt-blue or other colors. The size of the bowls and thickness of the ribs vary.

Ref: Sheppard #9, Toledo #236

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