Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

Pitkin Flask, Early American Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on October 3, 2017

The American Pitkin Flask

Pitkin Flask: Small bottle of green glass in an ovoid and flattened shape made by the “Half-Post Method”. In this method a gather of glass called a post is put back in the POT and a second gather is put on it so it covers about half of the post. It is then put in a vertical ribbed pattern mold and partly expanded and removed from the mold then swirled right or left. Also there are types in which the ribs are left it the vertical position. In the case of the popcorn Pitkin it is put in the mold a second time vertical ribs are put over swirled ribs call a broken swirl double pattern. Then the flask is expanded to the ovoid and flattened shape.

Originally these flasks were made in The Pitkin Glass Works in Manchester,CT (1788-1830).They were made later in other parts of New England and in the Midwest (e. g. Zanesville, Ohio 1810-1830).Today they are classified as being New England Pitkins or Midwestern Pitkins. You can usually tell the difference by counting the ribs. The New England is 36 ribs and Midwestern 16 ribs. In addition to various shades of green they can be found in amber, blue (rare), amethyst (rare) and colorless glass. The flask came in two main sizes half pint and pint, used as a pocket flask for whiskey.

Ref: Spillman II #46

pitkins Rear row A8MW A39MW A7NE Front row A19MW A43NE

Front row A 19, A 43, Rear row A8, A39, A7


Expanded-Diamond Glass Salt

Posted in 1. American Glass, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 25, 2017

American Expanded-Diamond  Glass Salt

 This cobalt blue salt was made by blowing the glass into a diamond mold pattern, then expanded and shaped.

H: 3 inches

1765-1800

Ref: Spillman I #175

49A American Expanded-diamond GlassSalt

49A American Expanded-diamond Glass Salt

American Mid-western Glass Creamer

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 24, 2017

Pittsburgh Glass Creamer

This beautiful creamer is made of colorless leaded glass and has a pattern-molded body with 15 ribs.  Its shape is typically  Mid-western  probably Pittsburgh .

H: 7 1/8 inches

1815-1840

Inness-Pittsburgh # 162

02A Pittsburgh Creamer

02A Pittsburgh Creamer

AMERICAN COBALT BLUE GLASS FOOTED BOWL

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 13, 2017

This is an American cobalt blue glass footed bowl. The beauty of this glass bowl is in the rich cobalt blue color and clean lines of its shape.

H: 4 inches

1780-1800

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-180065A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

This American bowl (1780-1800) is very similar in style and shape to a dark green wald glass beaker (1500-1550) and points to how art repeats itself time after time.

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

86E Medieval Wald Glass Beaker

86E Medieval Wald Glass Beaker

AMERICAN COBALT BLUE GLASS FOOTED BOWL

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 5, 2016

This is an American cobalt blue glass footed bowl. The beauty of this glass bowl is in the rich cobalt blue color and clean lines of its shape.

H: 4 inches

1780-1800

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

This American bowl (1780-1800) is very similar in style and shape to a dark green wald glass beaker (1500-1550) and points to how art repeats itself time after time.

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

65A American Cobalt Bowl 1780-1800

86E Medieval Wald Glass Beaker

86E Medieval Wald Glass Beaker

Poison Bottle with Hobnail Pattern

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 3, 2016

Poison Bottle with Hobnail Pattern

This poison bottle is in the shape of a half pint Pitkin made using the half post method.  Unlike some poison bottles it is made of colorless glass and has no embossed words on it.  The only distinguish characteristic that makes it a poison bottle is the hobnail pattern.

H: 4 ¾ inches

1810-1870

47A Poison Bottle

Enameled Green Glass Flask

Green Enameled Glass Flask

Green enameled glass bottle with screw top and cap. Enameled bottles of this type were produced in Bohemia, Germany and later in the US. The half post method was used for production.

H: 5 inches

D: Mid to late 18th Century

Ref: Merseyside # D27

67E Enameled Green Glass Flask

67E Enameled Green Glass Flask

American Chestnut Bottle

Posted in 1. American Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 16, 2016

American Chestnut Bottle

Free blown American chestnut bottles were made in great quantities by most of the early glass shops from about 1750 to 1850. They were mostly made of the natural color of glass which is different shades green to brown. The name chestnut is based on the bulbous and flattened shape. The bottles typically are 4 to 9 inches however some are as small as 2 inches and large as demijohns and carboys. Similar chestnut flasks were made in Germany in the 18th-19th century. Ref: Kechum p. 5,11, McKearin Plate 225, Spillman II #45

The three examples from the Allaire collections are:

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8"

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8″

05A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 7/8″

This is a dark olive green American chestnut bottle with pushed-up base.  Plain applied lip.

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

25A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

This free blown American chestnut bottle is olive green with pushed-up base and plain applied lip.

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

33A Chestnut Bottle H: 5 ½ inches

This light olive green American chestnut bottle has a high kick and plain applied lip.

Amber Pitcher with Lion Mask

The beautiful amber pitcher with a lion mask may be American or European.  The color and shape are typical for an American pitcher from this period, while the lion head mask decoration is commonly found on English or European objects.

H: 7 inches

1800-1835

61A Amber Pitcher with Lion Mask

Scroll Flask, Early American Glass

Posted in 1. American Glass, Early American Glass before 1850 by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 16, 2016

Aquamarine mold-blown half pint size scroll flask with a fleur-de-lis and stellar motif probably made in the Midwest. This beautiful example is similar to a flask on display at The Corning Museum of Glass accession #60.4.429 (pictured next to our flask below). The difference is that on the reverse side of the Corning flask, the scroll frame contains the letters of the manufacturer “BP & B”, Bakewell Page & Bakewells instead of the fleur-de-lis ornament.  Additional information on this type of scroll flasks can be found on Ian Simmonds, Early American Glass blog. http://www.iansimmonds.com/BlogWeMadeThis

11A Scroll Flask with Fleur-de-lis

The Corning Museum of Glass assession #60.4.429

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