Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

BALUSTER WINE GLASSES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 22, 2019

10E on the left is the French baluster        20E on the right is the English baluster

 

10E French Wine Glass of Allaire Collection

This French wine glass has a bucket bowl, stem with large bladed or angular knop and high folded foot. Made of soda glass

Height : 13½ cm, Weight: 84.5 g, Date: later part of 18th C,  Reference: Gros & Delettrez 2006 Lot 175

 

20E English Baluster of Allaire Collection

This is a wine glass with bucket bowl on inverted baluster and base knop, with folded foot. Made of lead glass.  Baluster Wines are a large group of beautiful and well designed glasses.

Date: 1720, Height: 5 ¼ inches (6,25 cm), Weight: 194 g, Reference: Bickerton # 59, Regency # 25

 

FACON de VENISE TRICK GOBLET

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 20, 2019

89E Facon de Venise Trick Goblet of Allaire Collection

 

The goblet has a double-walled bowl on a narrowing stem applied with a pincered collar. The glass has a grayish-lilac tint. It is called a trick glass because the inside bowl can be filled with wine through a small hole in the stem; the hole is then plugged with wax. A person could seem to drink all night without the glass becoming empty.  Or a person could go up to someone and pretend to spill it and nothing would happen.  A similar trick glass is known from the 4th Century of the Roman period. 

Dimensions: H = 13.1 cm, Stem H = 7 cm, Weight = 75 g

Origin & Date: Venice or Tuscany, 17th century.

Ref: The Collection Engels-De Lange, Lameris 2015 p. 81 #50, Christie’s March 28, 2000 # 140 & May 2007 #21, Sothby’s June 16, 1984 #73 & Dec. 18, 2002 #6&7, Rijksmuseum, #155, 156, Lameris, 1991 # 111, “Glass from the Ancient World: the Ray Winfield Smith Collection”, Corning 1957, #241

Also see another type of trick glass:

A VENETIAN TOASTMASTER’S OR DECEPTIVE GLASS WITH SPIKED GADROONS of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

 

A FINE SELECTION OF IMPRESSIVE GLASS JUGS FROM THE ROMAN WORLD

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 18, 2019

ROEMER TYPE WINE AND BEER GLASSES FROM THE 16TH CENTURY TO PRESENT

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 16, 2019

Roemers (Dutch) or Römer (German) are a type of wine and beer glass that evolved in the Rhineland and the Netherlands from the 17th Century.  They have their roots in the Waldglas particularly the Berkemeyer, Krautstrunk and Nuppenbecher of the later Middle Ages which were produced in northern Germany, the Low Countries and central Europe.  The Roemer style glass is still being produced today.

The forerunners of the Roemer were made in the 15th C as short beakers with an inverted conical shape bowl attached to an open stem decorated with pulled drops or prunts.  These are called Berkemeyers. Over time the glass on these vessels became thinner and the bowls developed into a hemispherical shape on a wider hollow base decorated with pulled or flatten prunts.  In the early 16th C this truly became an early Roemer when a foot was added formed by a trailed thread wound round a conical core.

The following examples are all from the Allaire Collection and are arranged more or less in chronological order. Things to look for in these examples are: bowl shapes, stems open or solid, prunts pulled, flatten or raspberry, engraving, and finally the type of foot. Below these pictures there are additional notes taken from Henkes-Glass Without Gloss, Utility glass from five Centuries excavated in the low countries 1300-1800. Harold E. Henkes, 1994 on factors on how to determent the age of a roemer.

 

Spanish Cantir with White Trails from Catalonia

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 14, 2019

44E Cantir with Filigrana from Catalonia of Allaire Collection

 

Cantir of yellowish glass decorated with opaque white trails called vetro a fili. Glassmakers in Catalonia, Spain were producing decoration of this type from the middle of the 16th into the 17th Century.

H: 19 1/2 cm

D: 2nd half of 16th to early 17th Century

ALLARD PIERSON MUSEUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 11, 2019

The Allard Pierson Museum is the archaeological museum of the University of Amsterdam, NL.  Artifacts from the ancient civilizations of ancient Egypt, the Near East, the Greek World, Etruria, and the Roman Empire are all curated and exhibited in this museum. Below are examples of their large and varied ancient glass collection.

Web site for the museum is http://www.allardpiersonmuseum.nl/en

CAST AND LATHE-CUT VESSELS OF THE HELLENISTIC AGE 330-30 B.C.

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 9, 2019

The objects below belong to a rare group of vessels made by casting in multipart molds by various methods, then meticulously ground and polished using lathes, abrasives, and hand tools. Some are decorated with lathe cut bands of grooves and ridges.

ROMAN GREEN GLASS PITCHER WITH TREFOIL MOUTH

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 7, 2019

53R Green trefoil mouth pitcher Allaire collection

This is a Roman glass pitcher with a pear-shaped body tapering into a slender neck with contrasting dark green coil.  The mouth is a trefoil shape with applied coil and the foot is tooled and splayed.

H: 12.5 cm

Fourth Century

Stern # 92, 94, Hermitage # 388 Ill. 195

ROMAN GLASS LENS-SHAPED FLASK

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 5, 2019

These types of flasks have one or two handles applied to shoulder and rim. Rim outsplayed, then turned up and in; neck tapering, splaying gently toward bottom; body circular in front elevation, egg-shaped in vertical section; base with kick.  Mold-blown decoration on body: on front and back, three concentric raised circles surrounded by rosette and raised petals; on sides, two rows of graduated circles with central bosses alternation with pairs of small bosses.  Date: 3rd to 4th century A.D. Ref: David Whitehouse Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass Volume two P. 131 #638

 

ANCIENT ROMAN & ISLAMIC OIL LAMPS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 3, 2019

Ancient Oil Lamps

Oil lamps were used by the ancient people of the Middle East, Europe, and Northern Africa to light their homes at night. They were fueled by fish oil, animal oil and fat but mainly by vegetable (olive) oil. A woven fibrous wick was placed in the hole at the tip of the lamp to burn the oil.  This group of people includes the Greeks, Romans, Jews, Early Christians, Egyptians, Muslims, Syrians, North Africans, Celts, Gauls, Britains, and even some early Crusaders.  The time period for oil lamps is approximately from 300 BC through 900 AD.  Generally they are thought of as Roman or early Islamic oil lamps.

The examples here are earthenware ceramic or clay lamps.  Oil lamps were also made in various metals and in glass.  The traditional Roman technique for making clay lamps was to press the raw clay into gypsum molds.  The two halves of the lamp were put together and the two holes were made. The green ware was then trimmed by hand using small metal tools and then fired in an oven.  More expensive oil lamps had glazes applied in the firing step.

Allaire Collection of Oil Lamps

 

David Giles Collection of  Roman Oil Lamps

%d bloggers like this: