Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

ROMAN GLASS TRULLA

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on April 10, 2021

83R Roman Trulla of The Allaire Collection

Date: Late 1st – early 2nd century A.D. Size: H 9.3 cm D 10.5 cm (rim), 9.3 cm (handle) W 113.5 g

Condition: Intact, Handle repaired in two places Classification: Isings (1957), form 75b

Description: Translucent light green glass bowl, ring base and handle. The bowl has an everted rim with rounded outer lip; tubular flange formed by folding at top of side; hemispherical body; applied, outsplayed, low oval base with rounded outer edge; slightly raised edge to concave bottom. The handle applied as a broad flat strap to edge of rim, with small pinched projection on either side, drawn out horizontally with concave side edges, then pinched off with rough surface marks from pincers on top and bottom. Intact, slight dulling, faint iridescence, and patches of weathering on one side of bowl.  Evidence of some weathering has been removed. No pontil mark present.

Remarks: Pans with handles were widely used in the Roman world, serving as ritual objects in religious ceremonies (D.Whitehouse 1997) and in sets of vessels for drinking (Hilgers 1969)

References: Whitehouse 1997, Corning Museum, No. 346., Hayes 1975, Ontario Museum, No. 148., Arveiller-Dulong 2005, Louvre Museum, No. 36., Massabò 2001, Aquileia Museum, No. 72., Saldern 1974, Oppenländer Collection, No. 557 (p. 241).

Parallel Trulla: Metropolitan Art Museum On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 171 picture below

The following links show additional Trullae on this site.

3.4. The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass    6.Nico F. Bijnsdorp

EGYPTIAN GLASS BOWLS from Karanis

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on April 7, 2021

66R Egyptian Glass Bowl of Allaire Collection

Date: 5th – 6th C. AD Size: H 6.5 cm D 10.5 cm

Description: The form of this bowl is typical of those found at Karanis in Faiyum, Egypt. It was made by free blowing the yellowish green glass into a bell-shaped bowl which sits on a large pad base with crisscross tooling on the exterior. It has a small kick and pontil mark on the base.

Ref: Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass vol. 1 # 107 & #109, Fascinating Fragility, Nico Bijnsdorp, P. 401, The Alfred Wolkenberg Collection, Christies’s July 9, 1991 Lot 74, Verres Antiques et De L’Islam, Juin 3 & 4, 1985 Paris, lot 406, Below a similar bowl from The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

EGYPTIAN DEEP BOWL of The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

4th-5th Century AD, Egypt (Fayum)
Size: H = 7.7 cm D = 13.8 cm

Classification: III.A.1(b).1 (Harden, Karanis deep bowl)

Intact

Description: Free-blown transparent yellowish-green bowl with applied and tooled foot. Pontil mark.

Provenance: The Alfred Wolkenberg Collection 1991

Ref.: Musée du Louvre II, no.1195, D.Whitehouse I no.107, N.F.Bijnsdorp, no.134

Exhibited: Brookes Memorial Art Gallery (Memphis, Tennessee) 1964, Thermen Museum Heerlen (NL), ‘Roman Glass from Private collections’, 29 April-28 August 2011, exp.no.31, Museum Honig Breethuis Zaandijk (NL), ‘Fascinating luxury from Antiquity’, 12 November 2011-30 January, exp. no 10

Published: Michael Milkovich, Ancient Glass from the Alfred Wolkenberg collection (1964) no.58, P.E.Cuperus, A Collection of Roman Glass 2009, no.113, Romeins Glas uit Particulier bezit (2011)

EUROPEAN MISC. GLASS, SPANISH GLASS AND ENAMELED DECORATED GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on April 3, 2021

All of the Glass Shown is From The Allaire Collections

European Misc. Glass

Spanish Glass

Enameled Decorated Glass from USA made in Germany

DOUBLE-BODIED JUGLET

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 31, 2021

ROMAN DOUBLE-BODIED GLASS JUGLET of Nico F. Bijnsdorp


Date: 2nd – 3rd century AD. Eastern Mediterranean.

Size: H= 9.0 cm. D max= 9.2 x 5.8 cm. D rim= 3.7 x 2.2 cm.

D base= 6.5 x 2.8 cm. Weight 74 gr.

Condition: Intact. Glossy. Some weathering.

Technique:  Free blown. Tooled. Handle applied.

Description: Transparent natural green glass with aquamarine tinge. Handle with reddish streaks.Two small bottles with spherical bodies,slightly concave bases and cylindrical necks were fused together by pressing the bodies and necks atone side to its counter part,slightly obliquely, resulting in one sloping shoulder and an opposite depressed shoulder. The necks tapering up ward to one rounded and one in folded rim, both flattened on top. Pontil mark at junction of the two bottoms. Handle of same glass with red streaks attached to shoulders and rims at join between the two bottles. Surface fire polished.

Remarks: This “oil and vinegar” jug was not a real novelty: double and even triple juglets of this type were rather common. They were always fashioned from more than one paraison and fused together while still hot.

Published: Groen & Rossum 2011, Romeins Glas uit particulier bezit, p. 59.tiek Glas 2001, video film Allard Pierson Museum.Sotheby’s 12 June 1997, No. 212.

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins glas uit particulier bezit,29 April–28 August 2011, No. 72. Allard Pierson Museum, Amsterdam, de Kunst van het Vuur,17 May – 16 September 2001, No. 70.

References:Israeli 2003, Israel Museum, No. 209.Auth 1976, Newark Museum, No. 116.Cima & Tomei 2012, Vetri a Roma, No. 65.Sotheby’s 4/5 June 1979, Constable Maxwell Collection, No. 218.Sotheby’s 7 July 1994, Benzian Collection, No. 150.

KNOP, A COMPONENT OF A STEM USED FOR ORNAMENTATION AND STRUCTURE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 28, 2021

KNOP STYLES

The Corning Museum of Glass defines a knop as: A component, usually bulbous, of the stem of a drinking glass, hollow or solid, used either singly or in groups, and placed contiguously or with intermediate spacing; also the finial at the center of a lid. For more information about knop styles see, An Illustrated Dictionary of Glass by Harold Newman, 1977 P.172.

Below you will see a variety of knop styles from the Allaire Collection and from the collection of Elisabeth and Theo Zandbergen. This link is to Elisabeth and Theo Zandbergen their blog page.

62E Spanish Glass Bottle 17th C with blue mellon knop

62E Blue Mellon Knop 17th Century

16E Beaded Knop 1740

16E Beaded Knop 1740

43E Merese and Knop 1690

43E Merese and Knop 1690

82E Hollow Knop 1750

82E Hollow Knop 1750

03E Flattened Ball Ribbed Knop over Hollow Inverted Baluster 19th Century

03E Flattened Ball Ribbed Knop over Hollow Inverted Baluster 19th Century

20E Inverted Baluster and Base Knop 1750

20E Inverted Baluster and Base Knop 1750

Facon de Venise Wine Glass from Elizabeth and Theo Zandbergen from northern Netherlands 17th Century. This fine wine glass has a so called rounded bucket bowl, see Bickerton, which is an almost cylindrical cup slightly, rounded of at the bottom. A bucket bowl is one of the rarer forms for this type of glass. The very large diameter foot is also quite typical for glasses from this period see also the glass with the two hollow knops. The cup set directly on a merese which on a second smaller merese and then attached to the top part of the pointed hollow knop. At the bottom part of the knop is again a small merese, followed by a short solid section connecting thru a flattened knop to the almost flat foot with turned in rim. The stem construction is a so called inverted baluster.

Facon de Venise Wine Glass from Elisabeth and Theo Zandbergen from northern Netherlands 17th Century. This fine wine glass has a so called rounded bucket bowl, see Bickerton, which is an almost cylindrical cup slightly, rounded of at the bottom. A bucket bowl is one of the rarer forms for this type of glass. The very large diameter foot is also quite typical for glasses from this period see also the glass with the two hollow knops. The cup set directly on a merese which on a second smaller merese and then attached to the top part of the pointed hollow knop. At the bottom part of the knop is again a small merese, followed by a short solid section connecting thru a flattened knop to the almost flat foot with turned in rim. The stem construction is a so called inverted baluster.

97E Knop with three Raspberry Prunts 1765

97E Knop with three Raspberry Prunts 1765

04E Bladed Knop 18th Century

04E Bladed Knop 18th Century

The Propellor knop from Elisabeth Theo Zandbergen collection.

The Propellor knop from Elisabeth Theo Zandbergen
collection.

ENGLISH GLASS TANKARD

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 25, 2021

17E Georgian Glass Half Pint Tankard of The Allaire Collection

Date: 1770 Height: 11.43cm, 4 ½ inches, Weight: 209.3g, 7.4 oz  Volume: 153ml 5.2 oz

Description: This English drinking vessel has a band of four threads below the rim, gadrooned base and single-loop combed handle. The vessel is slightly smaller then standard half pint and was used to drink a malt/hops type beer.

Reference: Eighteenth Century English Drinking Glasses L.M. Bickerton, Suffolk, 1986 # 816, 817

THE ROMAN GLASS TRULLA

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 22, 2021

THE BEAUTY OF THE GLASS TRULLAE

A Trulla (Latin) is a pan with a long horizontal handle.  Vessels of this type, made of both metal and glass, were widely used Roman world during the 1st century AD.  It has been suggested they were used for drinking, serving liquids in ritual ceremonies or perhaps even bathing. Found in the Western Empire.

The following links are for addition information on some of the above Trullae

3.4. The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass    6.Nico F. Bijnsdorp

The authenticity of this last vessel may be questionable.  It appears to be a composite of a 4th century Egyptian bowl with a handle of a Trulla applied at a later time.

Google Images

CYLINDRICAL ROMAN GLASS BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 19, 2021

 

CYLINDRICAL BOTTLE of Joop van der Groen

Roman Empire, Eastern Mediterranean │ Date: Late 1st century – 2nd century AD

Size: ↑ 17,0 cm; Ø max. 12,4 cm; Ø rim 7,5 cm. │ Weight: 437 gram

Technique: Mold-blown in an open mold. Neck and mouth free blown. Handle applied.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 51 a. Fleming (1999) type a for the handle.
Description: Transparent bluish-green glass. Cylindrical body with short cylindrical neck, rim folded outward, down, upward, and outward to form a collar. Shoulder slopes, with rounded edge. Wall tapers slightly and curves in the bottom; base plain, slightly concave on undersite; no pontil. Strap handle with twelve sharp ribs, applied into edge, drawn up and in, and attached to neck.
Condition: Intact with strong iridescence and with some encrustation
Remarks: A handle like this has been named “celery-handle”.
Through the interaction of liquid and pollutions in the ground glass is weathering and can get all colours of the rainbow.
Provenance: before 2005 in the private collection of Simon Spierer (1926 – 2005), Genève; he was an art dealer and patron of the arts.
Published: Romeins glas uit particulier bezit (J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum, 2011).
Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), “Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit”,
29 April – 28 August 2011, exp. no. 206
Reference: Ancient Glass of Asia Minor – The Yüksel Erimtan Collection (C. Lightfoot & M. Arslan, 1992), no. 18; Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum – The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts (Y. Israeli, 2003), no. 323; Ancient Glass in National Museums Scotland (C. Lightfoot, 2007), no. 180; Hôtel des Ventes d’Enghien, Enghien-les-Bains (Fr), Auction 22-05-2011, no. 8.

AMPHORA IN PROTECTIVE BASKET

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 16, 2021

AMPHORA IN PROTECTIVE BASKET of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

nfb 283

4th – 5th century AD. Egypt, possibly Coptic.
H = 16.0 cm. D max = 6.4cm. D rim = 5. cm. D base = 3.3 cm.

Condition: Amphora in perfect condition. Basket slightly damaged in two places.

Technique: Amphora free blown. Handles, thread, spout and foot applied. Basket in wickerwork, enforced by leather.

Description: Transparent olive-green glass. Basket pale and dark brown. The conical body of the amphora tapering to the bottom. Applied coil-foot with pontil mark. Sharp edge to shoulder, that is gently sloping to tubular neck with funnel mouth with infolded lip. One continuous trail, starting with one horizontal ring around the lower neck, then drawn up diagonally along the neck and ending in a second horizontal ring around the upper neck. Two opposed handles dropped onto the shoulder, arching to the neck and attached to the lower ring, where one handle ends but the other handle is further drawn up to end at the upper ring. A pointed, hollow spout is tooled on the shoulder.

Remarks: No unambiguous clarification could yet be given for the function of the spout and thus for the amphora itself. It has been suggested, that the amphora can be Coptic, since a similar object is exhibited in the Coptic Antiquities Room in The Louvre Museum in France. The clumsy way of placing and forming of the handles and the foot suggest, that this vessel was blown by a not very experienced glassblower.

Published: Slitine 2005, Histoire du Verre, L’Antiquité, p. 139.

Reference: No parallels could be found so far.

PEAR-SHAPED ROMAN GLASS JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on March 13, 2021

PEAR-SHAPED JUG OR LAGOENA of Hans van Rossum

PEAR-SHAPED JUG OR LAGOENA

Date: 4th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean Size: ↑15.7 cm | ø 5.8 cm | Weight 70 g

Technique: Free blown, handle, trail and foot applied

Description: Transparent purple glass, handle of pale green glass. Elegant pear-shaped body, long narrow neck, funnel-shaped and rounded mouth, rim folded outward and downward creating a hollow flange. Flat ribbed, long angular handle, applied on the shoulder, drawn up and down to top part of neck, folded, drawn up and attached to edge of rim, with protuberance above rim; on neck a thin pale green glass thread wound downward counterclockwise with three revolutions. Applied pad base, slightly indented with rest of pontil.

Condition: Intact, excellent condition

Remarks: In Roman times the common name for this type of jug was lagoena. The name was used for a jug made of pottery, silver, bronze or glass with the following and specific characteristics: a narrow neck, a bellied body and one or two handles. (Hilgers 1969)

Provenance: Collection C.A. Hessing, Laren (NL) 1998, formed in the 1990s, collection number 71
Amsterdam art market, Fridès Lameris 1993

Published: Vormen uit Vuur no. 220 (2013), p. 19, Antiek Glas, de Kunst van het Vuur, R. van Beek no. 58

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, exp. no. 75
29 April – 28 August 2011, Museum Simon van Gijn Dordrecht (NL), February 2004, Allard Pierson Museum Amsterdam (NL), de Kunst van het Vuur, exp. no. 58, 17 May – 16 September 2001

Reference: Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, N. Kunina no. 399
Katalog der römischen Gläser des Rheinischen Landesmuseums Trier, K. Goethert-Polaschek nos. 1316-17,  Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass -Vol. III, D. Whitehouse no. 1187, Les Verres Antiques du Musée du Louvre II, V. Arveiller-Dulong & M.D. Nenna no. 1027

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