Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

AMBER RIBBED BOWL (zarte Rippenschale)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 26, 2017

AMBER RIBBED ROMAN BOWL (zarte Rippenschale) of  Hans van Rossum

First half of 1st century AD | Roman Empire with areas of concentration in northern Italy, Dalmatia, Carniola (Slovenia) and the Ticino area

Size↑5.5 cm | ø 7.8 cm | Weight 44 g

Technique: Probably combination of a mold and free blown, tooled

Classification: Isings 1957 form 17

Description: Translucent amber glass, the flaring and widened mouth with a cracked-off rim cover a squat spherical body, blown into a mold and decorated with nineteen ribs which are connected by an arch. Flattened base, no pontil mark.

Condition: Rim chipped, body with incredible silvery and golden iridescence

Remarks: Because the exact procedure of shaping the ribs is still disputed, more information about the way in which the Roman glass-maker possibly could have made this zarte Rippenschale, with thanks to Theo Zandbergen (NL), David Giles (UK) and Mark Taylor & David Hill of the Roman Glassmakers, London. The body color (blue, brown, etc.) is formed as a small bubble to start with. Then, in case of a thread decoration, a spiral of white (usually starting with the attachment at the bottom, though not always – you can usually see it at the centre of the base – resembling a ‘tadpole head’) going round the paraison all the way up towards the iron. (the trailing above the ribs might be applied separately at the end of the process) Re-heat, then a small amount of inflation, then pushing into the optic mold (star pattern) which then makes the whole paraison look like the centre of one of those glass lemon squeezers. Re-heat, then a bit more inflation, then use the pincers to squeeze a generous rib out using the protruding bits of the stars. Using the pincers now has the effect of cooling the ribs (sucking heat out from them, and the re-heats never fully warm these through again), and because they are stiffer, they will not expand as much as the body of the glass when it is inflated again. The ribs are only a tiny bit inflated in the mold as markers and then it is blown much more in free blowing and is also pulled around by tools and pinchers. In that process the position of the ribs is becoming distorted and sometimes misshaped. The ribs, with the stiff glass, stay the same, with their vivid contrasting color-way, but because the vessel body expands, to become much thinner, it stretches both the body color and the white so thin that sometimes the white is made to almost appear to fade out. But it is always there. The arches, some bowls have, are occurring naturally as the glass overflowed the short mold and expanded outwards. It looks as if it is a curved mold, the glassmaker used but it is not. It is just a natural bridge which does not always occur on examples of these bowls and depends how much puff or inflation the glassmaker gave to it when in the mold.

Provenance: anonymous sale; Piasa Drouot Paris, auction 2 June 2006, lot 61

Reference: Gläser der Antike, Sammlung Oppenländer, A. von Saldern no. 265 (5.4 x 7.6 cm) The Fascination of Ancient Glass, Dolf Schut Collection, M. Newby and D. Schut no. 1 (5.7 x 8.0 cm) Bonhams London, auction 27 April 2006 lot 223 (5.5 x 6.8 cm) Vetri antichi del Museo Civico Archeologico di Padova, G. Zampieri no. 276 (6.7 x 9.7 cm)

Literature: ‘Die Verbreitung der ‘’zarten Rippenschalen’’ T. E. Haevernick in Jahrbuch des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums Mainz, 14. Jahrgang 1967

MEROVINGIAN GLASS CUPS (5th – 7th C)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 24, 2017

MEROVINGIAN GLASS CUPS (5th – 7th C)

“The most frequent form of cup is a small hemispherical or bell-shaped vessel that would fit in the palm of one’s hand: hence the name “palm cup.” Palm cups may have a plain, fire-polished rim or rim that was folded out and down to produce the appearance of a collar. As with most other varieties of early medieval drinking vessels, cups may be undecorated or have dip-molded ribs or trails.” Taken from the book: Medieval Glass for Popes, Princes, and Peasants by David Whitehouse (2010) Below are pictures of plam cups from various and collections.

 

J. Paul Getty Museum

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 22, 2017

J. Paul Getty Museum

The J. Paul Getty Museum has two beautiful locations with magnificent views, grounds and architecture structures, the Getty Villa in Malibu and the Getty Center in Los Angeles.  Click on this link for the J. Paul Getty Museum web site.

Getty Center in Los Angeles

The Getty Center in Los Angeles houses European paintings, drawings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, decorative arts, and European and American photographs. The European glass at Getty Center covers a range in date from the late Middle Ages to the late seventeenth century.

Getty Villa in Malibu

Getty Roman Villa in Malibu is part of The J. Paul Getty Museum.  The Getty Villa is modeled after a first-century Roman country house, the Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum, Italy.  The Villa dei Papiri was buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, and much of it remains unexcavated. The Getty Villa houses approximately 44,000 works of art from the Museum’s extensive collection of Greek, Roman, and Etruscan antiquities, of which over 1,200 are on view. To see additional pictures of the Getty Villa glass collection click on this link.  **Glass at Getty Villa in Malibu in our Study Gallery. This additional link is to a clip on the Villa conduction.

Oppenlander Ancient Glass Collection

In 2003 the Getty acquired more than 350 works of ancient glass from the private collection of Erwin Oppenlander. This collection is remarkable for its cultural and chronological breadth.  The Oppenlander collection is the bases of a new exhibition called Molten Color at the Getty Villa.

ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS AT THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 19, 2017

ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS AT THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM

The Princeton University Art Museum is one of the nation’s finest art museums, housing collections of over 72, 000 works of art spanning 5,000 years of world history and all the world’s major cultures. The Museum also presents special exhibitions and educational programs throughout the year. Admission is free. It is located at the heart of Princeton University, one of the world’s great research universities in the charming small-city setting of Princeton, New Jersey.

The glass collection is about 509 glass vessels, plaques, and inlays from the Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic periods. The bulk of the glass vessels are Roman from the eastern Mediterranean region.  There is a new publication on this collection Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum, Anastassios C. Antonaras, author.

The following pictures are from this collection. Click on the thumbnails below to enlarge.

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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE RENAISSANCE in the Chateau d’Ecuen

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 17, 2017

 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE RENAISSANCE IN FRANCE

The Château d’Écouen, in Écouen, north of Paris which today houses the National Museum of the Renaissance (opened in 1982) was built between 1538 and 1555 as commanded by Anne de Montmorency, an extremely wealthy and influential advisor to François the First, king of France. Today, as well as offering the opportunity to observe this impressive example of 16th century architecture, the museum displays collections of the Musée de Cluny comprising Renaissance objects including paintings, sculpture, textiles, furniture, metalwork and glass.

The glass collection is excellent, comprising mainly Venetian, Facon de Venise, and Spanish examples from the 16th and 17th Centuries. Click on the pictures to enlarge them and use Esc to get back to this page.

ROMAN GLASS OF THE FIRST CENTURY

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 13, 2017

ROMAN GLASS OF THE FIRST CENTURY

The glass blowing revolutionized the Roman glass industry of the first century. It allowed, for the first-time, glass to be sold to the average Roman.  Also with blowing an object could be made much larger as well as quickly.  Before this glass was only a luxury item as rare as gold or precious stones. This was mainly caused by the time it took to make core-formed objects (45 minutes) or casting or cutting techniques (several days) and size and technology of furnaces.  Glass blowing is a process of forming an object quickly and in many different sizes and shape.  Simply, it is blowing air through a metal tube (blow pipe) into a mass of molten glass.  This short clip from Corning Museum of Glass by Bill Gudenrath explains it clearly (active link). Glass blowing was developed probably by Romans in Syria or Phoenicia (now the region of modern Lebanon) in 50 to 75 B.C.  If not discovered by the Romans it was certainly exploited by them throughout the Empire.

Below are some examples of blown glass objects of the first century from the Allaire collection and the collections of our contributors.

From the collection of Joop van der Groen(active link)

From the collection of The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass(active link)

From the collection of Nico F. Bijnsdorp(active link)

From the collection of of David Giles(active link)

From the collection of Hans van Rossum(active link)

From the Allaire Collection of Ancient Roman Glass(active link)

THE VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, GLASS COLLECTION HIGHLIGHTS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 12, 2017

The Victoria and Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum, in London

The Victoria and Albert Museum, in London

V&A Museum's Foyer with a Dale Chihuly glass sculpture in the center

V&A Museum’s Foyer with a Dale Chihuly glass sculpture in the center

 

The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, is the world’s largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects. It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. The glass collection covers 4000 years of glass making, and has over 6000 items from Africa, Britain, Europe, America and Asia. The earliest glassware on display comes from Ancient Egypt and continues through the Ancient Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance covering areas such as Venetian glass and Bohemian glass and more recent periods, including Art Nouveau glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany and Émile Gallé. The Art Deco style is represented by several examples by René Lalique. There are many examples of crystal chandeliers displayed in the British and Venetian galleries attributed to Giuseppe Briati dated c1750. The stained glass collection is possibly the finest in the world, covering the medieval to modern periods, with examples from Europe as well as Britain. Several examples of English 16th-century heraldic glass are displayed in the British Galleries. Many well-known designers of stained glass are represented in the collection including, from the 19th century: Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris. There is also an example of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work in the collection and other 20th-century designers. Most of the glass pictures below are from the museum’s own web site.

Medieval Europe: MEROVINGIAN, LATE MEDIEVAL AGES AND ROEMERS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 11, 2017

MEROVINGIAN

Frankish Bell Beaker

51E Merovingian Bell Beaker, 5th -7th Century

51E Merovingian Bell Beaker, 5th -7th Century

MEROVINGIAN TRAILED BEAKER

54E Merovingian Beaker 5th to 6th C

54E Merovingian Beaker 5th to 6th C

MEROVINGIAN GLASS CONE BEAKER

60E Merovingian Cone Beaker, Late 5th to first half of 6th C

60E Merovingian Cone Beaker, Late 5th to first half of 6th C

ANGLO-SAXON GLASS BOWL

80E Merovingian Bowl Late 5th- Early 6th C

80E Merovingian Bowl Late 5th- Early 6th C

Merovingian Green Bell Beaker

90E Merovingian green bell beaker Late 6th-Early 7th C

90E Merovingian green bell beaker Late 6th-Early 7th C

Merovingian Glass Bell Beaker

112E Merovingian bell beaker

112E Merovingian bell beaker D: 6th Century

Merovingian Palm Cup

114E Merovingian Palm Cup

114E Merovingian Palm Cup, Date: 600-800 AD

MEROVINGIAN OR GALLO-ROMAN GLASS BEAKER

115E Gallo-Roman Glass Beaker

115E Gallo-Roman Glass Beaker D: 4th –Early 5th Century

MEROVINGIAN TRAILED BEAKER

115E Merovingian Trailed Beaker 5-6th C

115E Merovingian Trailed Beaker 5-6th C

Merovingian Glass Bell Beaker

117E Merovingian bell beaker

117E Merovingian bell beaker D: 6th Century AD

LATE MIDDLE AGES

Early Roemer

12E Berkmeyer 2nd Half of 16th Century H 9cm

12E Berkmeyer 2nd Half of 16th Century H 9cm

Krautsrunk Beaker from The Middle Ages

13E Krautstrunk C. 1490-1500 H 9.5 cm

13E Krautstrunk C. 1490-1500 H 9.5 cm

Waldglas Maigelein from the Middle Ages

23E Maigeline C. 1470-1520

23E Maigeline C. 1470-1520

MEDIEVAL MAIGELEIN

49E Maigelin C. 1470-1520

49E Maigelin C. 1470-1520

WARZENBEACHER (wart beaker)

74E Warzenbecher 17th Century

74E Warzenbecher 17th Century

Medieval Glass Beaker with Stem Foot

86E Medieval Wald Glass Beaker C. 1500-1550

86E Medieval Wald Glass Beaker C. 1500-1550

Keulenglas Beaker

105E Keulenglas Beaker 17th Century

105E Keulenglas Beaker 17th Century

Ridged Beaker with a Distinct Foot

109E Medieval Beaker 15th Century

109E Medieval Beaker 15th Century

TRAILED GLASS BEAKER FROM THE NETHERLANDS

110E Trailed Beaker from the Netherlands 17th Century

110E Trailed Beaker from the Netherlands 17th Century

ROEMERS

Later Engraved Roemer

05E Roemer Engraved Roemer Late 18th Century H 12.7 cm

05E Roemer Engraved Roemer Late 18th Century H 12.7 cm

Engraved Roemer

08E Engraved Roemer Late 17th Century H 13cm

08E Engraved Roemer 17th Century H: 13cm

Later Engraved Roemer

09E Engraved Roemer Second half of the 18th Century H 13cm

09E Engraved Roemer Second half of the 18th Century H 13cm

SHALLOW ROEMER

18E Shallow Roemer 2nd Half of 17th Century H 9cm

18E Shallow Roemer 2nd Half of 17th Century H 9cm

LARGE GREEN ROEMER

31E Large Roemer

31E Large Roemer H: 15.5 cm Date: Late 17th Century

EARLY ROEMER

40E Early Roemer 16th Century H 9cm

40E Early Roemer 16th Century H 9cm

LARGE COLORLESS ROEMER

45E Colorles Roemer C. 1700-1720 H 16cm

45E Colorles Roemer C. 1700-1720 H 16cm

A PAIR OF MATCHING ROEMERS

46E A&B A Pair of Matching Roemers 17th-18th Century

46E A&B A Pair of Matching Roemers 17th-18th Century

LIGHT GREEN MODERN ROEMER

48E Light green Roemer 19-20th C H: 4 ½ inches

48E Light green Roemer 19-20th C

H: 4 ½ inches

ROEMER WITH SPHERICAL PRUNTS

50E Roemer with Spherical Prunts C. 1650-1675 H 12cm

50E Roemer with Spherical Prunts C. 1650-1675 H 12cm

EARLY ROEMER

56E Early Roemer 16th Century H 10cm

56E Early Roemer 16th Century H 10 cm

ENAMELED ROEMER (Ray’s Roemer)

57E Victorian Enamelled Roemer 1890-1910 H 11cm

57E Victorian Enamelled Roemer 1890-1910 H 11cm

LARGE GREEN ROEMER

58E Tall Dark Green Roemer Late 17th Century H 15.8cm

58E Tall Dark Green Roemer Late 17th Century H 15.8cm

LARGE DUTCH ROEMER

59E Large Dutch Roemer 17th Century H 16.5cm

59E Large Dutch Roemer 17th Century H 16.5cm

SMALL GREEN ROEMER

106E Small Green Glass Roemer It may be from the Netherlands. H: 11.5 cm 17th Century

106E Small Green Glass Roemer
H: 11.5 cm 17th Century

 

Core and Rod-Formed Early Glass Objects

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on May 3, 2017

Core and Rod-Formed Glass Objects 6th BC.  To 4th AD.

Methods of making glass objects came about shortly after glass was discovered.  The first glass objects manufactured were not vessels but amulets or pendant and beads (see example Pendant nfb 270). Vessels were made later by core winding (all of rest of the examples) from 1500 to 1200 BC. in the Mesopotamia, Egypt and Eastern Mediterranean region. Production declined between 1200 and 800 but revived from 800 to the 1st century BC. After the introduction of glass blowing by the Syrians 100 BC, the method ceased to be used with few exceptions (see Miniature core form jug).  A good scholarly book on this type of glass is Early Ancient Glass, David Grose, Toledo Museum, 1989.

This link is to a short video from Corning Museum of Glass on these methods. (http://www.cmog.org/video/core-formed-vase)

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass active link

FOUR CORE-FORMED FISH SHAPED GLASS BEADS active link

CARTHAGINIAN HEAD PENDANT

Below

From the collection of Nico F. Bijnsdorp active link

CORE-FORMED OINOCHOE active link

 

 ROD-FORMED HEAD PENDANT active link

ROD-FORMED KOHL TUBE WITH STOPPER active link

From the collection of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen active link

CORE FORMED ALABASTRON active link

CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE active link

 

SMALL CAN BE BEAUTIFUL, A CORE FORM JUG active link

From the Allaire collection

Core-Formed Alabastron 26R active link

 

 

 

 

English Glass Week Finale (Sunday)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on April 30, 2017
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