Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES ROMAN GLASS ARYBALLOI

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 16, 2018

VENETIAN & FAÇON de VENISE VENICE GLASSES OF THE RENAISSANCE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 14, 2018

VENETIAN & FAÇON de VENISE VENICE GLASS

The Renaissance Period was the cultural rebirth that occurred in Europe from roughly the fourteenth through the middle of the seventeenth centuries, based on the rediscovery of the literature of Greece and Rome. … Renaissance means “rebirth” or “reawakening.”  The renaissance of glassmaking in Europe mainly took place Venice.

The Roman glassmaking industry in Europe slowly die out from the fourth century and became glass of the Migration Period and Middle Ages (6th-14th C).  Venice became the dominant glass manufacturing center from the 15th to the end of the 16th century. Glass objects in the Venetian style are of the finest quality light weight glass with attributes like delicacy, elaborateness, colorfulness (enamel decoration) created by highly skilled glassworkers. Byzantine craftsmen and glassworkers played an important role in the development of Venetian glass when they migrated from Constantinople to Venice in 1204 and again in 1453. Towards the end of the 13th century, the center of the Venetian glass industry was moved to Murano. By the 16th century, Venetian artisans had gained even greater control over the color and transparency of their glass, and had mastered a variety of decorative techniques. Murano artisans used specialized tools in the making of their glass. Some of these tools include borselle (tongs or jacks used to form the hot glass), soffietta (known as a puffer and used to inflate a vessel after it has been transferred to the punty), pontello or punty (an iron rod to which the craftsman attaches the glass after blowing to add final touches), scagno (the glass-master’s work bench) and tagianti (large glass-cutting clippers). Near the end of the 16th century Venice started to lose control over the luxury glass market. By the 17th century Façon de Venise (in the style of Venetian glass) was adopted in many countries of Europe and England. It should be noted that at approximately the same time period as the Venetians, highly skilled glassworkers were also busy in Altare. It is quite difficult to make a distinction between glass objects made in Venice or Altare. It is sometimes stated that the spreading of the art of making sophisticated glass over Europe mainly came from trained glassworkers from Altare as there was a ban on the free movement of glassworkers from Venice. What we nowadays call Façon de Venise glass made in Spain, France, and the Netherlands can be seen as the combined contributions of glassworkers from Altare and Venice. The renaissance of glassmaking in Britain can also be attributed to glassworkers from Italy. It remains quite difficult and tricky declaring glasses of Venetian/Altarian origin or Façon de Venise. For some it is quite clear and others can fall either way. Verre de Fougère is a sub-type of Façon de Venise glass from France and refers to glass made using fern-ash as a flux. The ash can give a specific “smoky”, brownish, ginger or sandy coloring to the glass. Co-Author Theo Zandbergen

For additional information see these links below posted on this site.

GLASS OF THE MIDDLE AGES,GLASS OF THE BYZANTINE PERIOD & EARLY MIDDLE AGES,MIGRATION PERIOD (6TH-9TH C) MEROVINGIAN,-BYZANTINE AND ISLAMIC GLASS,Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen SEE SECOND PART OF THIS PAGE,MEDIEVAL GLASS GALLERY 307 AT THE MET,THE BRITISH MUSEUM: POST ROMAN AND MEROVINGIAN GLASS 5TH – 7TH C,– FRENCH, VENETIAN AND FACON DE VENISE GLASS AT THE LOUVRE,NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE RENAISSANCE IN FRANCE,Naming: Stem Formations From A to Z on Venetian and Façon de Venise Wine Glasses,VENETIAN & FACON de VENISE GLASS in Allaire Collection

The following are examples of  Venetian & Façon de Venise glass.

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES OF HIGHLY IRIDESCENT ANCIENT GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 10, 2018

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES OF HIGHLY IRIDESCENT ANCIENT GLASS

The iridescence on ancient glass was unintentional unlike what is found on modern Tiffany, Loetz, and Steuben glass. Caused by weathering on the surface, the iridescence, and the interplay of lustrous, changing colors, is due to the refraction of light by thin layers of weathered glass. How much a glass object weathers depends mainly on burial conditions and to a lesser extent the chemistry of it. These conditions are humidity, heat and type of soil the glass was buried in. The chemistry of ancient glass though basically the same as our soda glass differed in the purity of raw materials and compositional ratio.  There were also differences in flux alkali used such as natron (sodium carbonate) or potash (potassium carbonate). Generally glass made in the Western Provinces with potash has less iridescence than glass from the Eastern Mediterranean areas using natron. At the same time burial conditions also were different. Natural iridescence is sometimes found on modern glass bottles from digs in the back yards of old houses or pulled out of river beds. The word iridescence comes from Iris, the Greek Goddess of rainbows and refers to rainbow-like colors seen on the glass which changes in different lighting.  It is simply caused by alkali (soluble salt) being leached from the glass by slightly acidic water and then forming fine layers that eventually separate slightly or flake off causing a prism effect on light bouncing off and passing through the surface which reflects light differently, resulting in an iridescent appearance. Modern iridescence sometimes called iris glass is made by adding metallic compounds to the glass or by spraying the surface with stannous chloride or lead chloride and reheating it in a reducing atmosphere.

Hans van Rossum

AMBER RIBBED BOWL (zarte Rippenschale)

(CREATION OF MOTHER NATURE)

MULTI-HANDLED JAR

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

TWO ROMAN MINIATURE AMPHORAE

 

Joop van der Groen

CYLINDRICAL ROMAN BOTTLE

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

ROMAN COBALT BLUE RIBBED “MELON” GLASS BOWL

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

 

PATTERN-BLOWN DROPPER FLASK

Nico F. Bijnsdorp collection

David Giles

PRUNTED MEDIEVAL GLASS BEAKER

A LARGE SHALLOW ROMAN GLASS BOWL

 

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

SQUARE JAR WITH FLARING RIM AND FOUR INDENTED SIDES

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

 

GLASS OBJECTS WITH LIDS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 7, 2018

EXAMPLE FROM CONTRIBUTING COLLECTORS

LIDDED PYXIS of  Hans van Rossum

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR of Hans van Rossum

ARYBALLOS WITH CHAIN AND STOPPER of Hans van Rossum

LIDDED PYXIS of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

LIDDED PYXIS 1st century AD. Eastern Mediterranean, perhaps Syria.

ROD-FORMED KOHL TUBE WITH STOPPER of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROD-FORMED KOHL TUBE WITH STOPPER Probably 6th century BC. Eastern Mediterranean.

CINERARY URN of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROMAN CINERARY URN Second half of 1st century AD. Western Empire, probably Italy

ROMAN GREEN GLASS CINERARY URN WITH LID of David Giles

ROMAN GREEN GLASS CINERARY URN WITH LID Date: 1st/2nd century AD Height: 22cm excluding lid. Origin: These were found mainly in the Western Empire but some from North Africa and a few from Greece and Asia Minor.

Facon de Venise Spanish Arbarello Jar with Lid of Allaire collection

Allaire Collection 69E Remarks: This small lidded vessel of greenish transparent glass is decorated with cage-like white threads. It may possibly have served as a pharmaceutical jar. Finding a vessel of this type with a lid is uncommon. 17th C

 

Lidded Venetian Compote with Turquoise Decoration  of Allaire collection

14E Venetian Lidded Compote 17th or 19th Century

 

Small Covered Facon de Venise Glass Jar of Allaire collection

Facon de Venise Covered Jar with Animal Head Medallions 1600 C.

 

 

 

 

TWO ROMAN TREFOIL-LIPPED GLASS JUGS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 5, 2018

TWO TREFOIL-LIPPED JUGS FROM THE SAME AREA of  Hans van Rossum

 

 Both jugs found near Jenin (Samaria-Israel) from Late 3rd century – early 4th century AD

 

Below is information on the two Roman glass jugs (see A and B)

Jug A

Size↑18.5 cm | ø 10.0 cm | Weight 188 g

Technique: Free blown, handle, foot and coils applied; tooled

Classification: Isings 1957 form 121a (variant)

Description: Transparent green glass, ovoid body standing on a splayed foot, cylindrical neck, trailed trefoil lip, broad and heavy angular strap-handle applied on the shoulder and attached to the rim. A coil ring is encircling the base of the neck. No pontil mark.

Condition: Intact, perfect condition, some colorful spots of iridescence on the body

Provenance: Jerusalem art market, Biblical Antiquities – Gil Chaya, Jerusalem 2004

Reference: Bonhams London, auction 12 July 2000 lot 70, Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, N. Kunina no. 261, Sotheby’s London,  auction 12 June 1997 lot 213, Ancient and Islamic Glass in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, A. Oliver Jr. no. 157, Charles Ede London Ltd. General Antiquities Catalogue 183 (2011) no. 33, Christie’s New York, auction 8 June 2012 (Wunsch Foundation) lot 160
Jean-David Cahn AG, Auktion 4 19. Oktober 2002 no. 377

Jug B

ize↑15.0 cm | ø 9.4 cm | Weight 182 g

Technique: Free blown, handle and coils applied; tooled

Description: Translucent moss green glass, squat piriform body, cylindrical neck, mouth with trefoil folded lip. Base indented with rest of pontil. Ribbed handle, applied on shoulder, drawn up and down, terminating in fold to underside rim. Body with twelve ribs, pinched lengthwise, ribs differ in terms of their direction, sharpness and distance between them. Trail wound below rim and at bottom of neck.
Condition: Intact, some weathering

Provenance: Jerusalem art market, Biblical Antiquities, Gil Chaya, Jerusalem 2004

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, no. 109, 29 April – 28 August 2011

Reference: Sotheby’s New York, auction 13 June 1996 lot 160, Bonhams London, auction 21 October 1999 lot 74, The Barakat Gallery, a Catalogue of the Collection, no. GF 107, p. 113 (also said to be found in Samaria – Israel), Les Verres Antiques du Musée du Louvre II, V. Arveiller-Dulong & M.D. Nenna no. 1004, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Collection of Mediterranean Antiquities, B. Caron & P. Zoïtopoúlou no. 116, Musées d´Art et d´Histoire, Ville de Geneve, inv. no. 018596

MULTI-SIDED AMPHORISKOS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 2, 2018

MULTI-SIDED AMPHORISKOS of A Private Dutch Collection of Roman Glass

MULTI-SIDED AMPHORISKOS

MULTI-SIDED AMPHORISKOS

MULTI-SIDED AMPHORISKOS

MULTI-SIDED AMPHORISKOS

1st Century A.D., Eastern Mediterranean
H = 7.1 cm, D = 3.3 cm (body)
Intact and in excellent condition

Description: The aubergine amphoriskos is blown in a bipartite mold with two vertical sections (folded out rim and cylindrical neck free-blown) Two translucent green handles, applied to the barrel-shaped octagonal body.
Remark: P.L.W.Arts: ‘ This type of bottle was made with two handles and more rarely with a single handle, often in a contrasting color to the body. Only a fea examples have recorded provenances (Urbnis, Kerch, Zadar). Examples without secure find-spots are often assigned to the Syro-Palestinian area and are sometimes associated with the glass-making centre of Sidon.’
Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), ‘Roman Glass from private collections’,
29 April – 28 August 2011, exp. no. 94
Museum Honig Breethuis (NL) ’Fascinating luxury of Antiquity’
12 November 2011– 30 January 2012 , exp no. 22

Published: Romein Glas uit particulier bezit (2011)

Provenance: Lameris Antiquities Amsterdam (NL)

Ref. Stern 1955 no.52, Auth 1976 no.68

COLORLESS CARCHESIUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 31, 2017

COLORLESS CARCHESIUM of Joop van der Groen

COLOURLESS CARCHESIUM

COLORLESS CARCHESIUM

Roman Empire, Eastern Mediterranean │ 2nd – 3th century AD
Size: ↑ 9,9 cm; Ø foot 4,8 cm; Ø rim 9,4 cm. │ Weight: 72 gram

Technique: Free blown. Tooled.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 36 b.
Description: Transparent colorless glass with a number of small air bubbles. Body of waisted bell-shaped form. Side wall sharply curving back to slightly concave underside. Bottom pushed in to form a tubular base ring. Pontil mark. Thin glass thread around the body. Rounded rim.
Condition: Intact.
Remarks: Carchesia have been found throughout the whole Roman Empire. La Baume (1974) says: “Carchesia of glass have been blown according to examples in metal.” It is not certain that this form was called carchesium in the antiquity (Isings, 1957).
The basic color of Roman glass is bluish-green. This has been caused because sand (the main element for making raw glass) has been polluted by iron oxide. By addition of 0,2 to 1,5 percent antimony oxide the bluish/green raw glass changes into colorless glass. The use of silver or quartz sand also results in colorless glass.
Provenance: 2006 Frides Lameris Kunst en Antiekhandel vof, Amsterdam. Before 2006 in a private Dutch collection.
Published: Romeins glas uit particulier bezit (J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum, 2011).
Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), “Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit”,
29 April – 28 August 2011, exp. no. 48.
Reference: Glas der antiken Welt (P. La Baume, La 1974), no. D 8: Archéologie, Collections de deux Grands Amateurs (Binoche et Giquelllo, Paris), 30-05-2012, no. 159; Kunstwerke der Antike (Cahn Auktionen AG Basel), Auktion 7, 03-11-2012, no. 112; Ancient Coins & Antiquities, Archaeological Center Tel Aviv), Auction 54, 27-03-2013, no. 243.

DRINKING BEER WITH CLASS (GLASS)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 29, 2017
Beer is one of the oldest and most popular alcoholic beverages dating back to the 6th Millennium BC.   Beginning in the Middle East and Egypt in the earliest history its popularity spread throughout the world in later times.

The following pictures show examples from our collection to illustrate various styles of vessels for drinking beer.

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES OF VERY RARE FORMS & EXAMPLES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 24, 2017

COLLECTORS’ EXAMPLES OF VERY RARE FORMS & EXAMPLES

An explanation of what is considered a very rare form & example for this post.  The examples shown are objects which have only a very few parallels in Museums or in the literature.  The monetary value of these examples were not part of the criteria for choosing.

 

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

A Venetian toastmaster’s or deceptive glass with spiked gadroons

 

Hans van Rossum

SEALED ARYBALLOS

MELTED ROMAN GLASS PERFUME BOTTLE

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR

DECORATED PYXIS OR JAR

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROMAN ASKOS

DOUBLE-BODIED JUGLET

SNAIL RHYTON

Roman glass snail rhyton

BOWL WITH DIAMOND-SHAPED MOTIFS

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The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

FOUR CORE-FORMED FISH SHAPED GLASS BEADS

ROMAN GLASS BOWL WITH FACET DECORATION

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

ROEMER WITH SPHERICAL PRUNTS

50E Roemer with Spherical Prunts C. 1650-1675 H 12cm

 

FACON de VENISE TRICK GOBLET

89E Facon de Venise trick glass C. 1650

Long Neck Roman Bottle with Iridescence

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 22, 2017

Long Neck Roman Bottle with Iridescence

46R Roman Bottle with a long neck

This spherical flask was blown from colorless glass. Around the body are several wheel-cut bands. The long tubular neck ends with a collared rim. The piece is intact and has a beautiful bluish green iridescence.

H: 19.7 cm

2nd -3rd Century AD

Ref: Loudmer, Kevorkian, 1985, Collection Monsieur D # 336

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