Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

Late Roman Bottle with Neck Ruffle

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, Islamic Glass, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 19, 2017

This bottle is olive green; the globular body has a flattened and indented base.  The tall neck has a slight constriction where it joins the body and is decorated with a ruffled collar.    The form may be from the crossover time between Roman and Islamic periods.

H: 11cm

Late Fifth or Sixth Century

Hayes 1975 #402 & 403, Oliver 1980 #203, Auth 1976 #118, A.P.C. #N-63, Glass from the Roman Empire, Paul E. Cuperus P. 34, Israeli Museum #431

Ring Goblet

Posted in 3. European Glass, European Misc. by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 18, 2017

This is a rare clear glass goblet with small handles for suspending rings, originally six only one remaining. Milled thread applied to the center with wavy band decoration.  The knopped stem enclosing an elongated tear. It was probably made in the Low Countries or Germany.

C: 1st Half of the 17th Century

H: 16.5 cm

Published: Christie’s Amsterdam May 15, 2007 lot #26

Ref: Rijksmuseum Vol. I, 1993, #41

101E German Ring Goblet

SPANISH GLASS BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 16, 2017

SPANISH GLASS BOTTLE

This is a small Spanish ovoid glass bottle, of yellow tint over a blue melon knop and a folded conical foot.  There is no known parallel to this exact shape in the literature.

H: 11.5 cm

Date:First half of 17th Century

62E Spanish Bottle First half of 17th Century

62E Spanish Bottle First half of 17th Century

FACON de VENISE GOBLET

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 14, 2017

Facon de Venise Wine Glass

Remarks: This is an early 17th century Facon de Venise goblet from France in a classic shape. The glass has a trumpet-shape bowl with a broad mouth a hollow knop and inverted baluster stem on a flat circular foot.

Stem definition: hollow knop and inverted baluster (for more stems definitions follow this link)

condition: excellent

H: 16.5 cm, D:  10.4 cm

Date: Early 17th Century

Ref: Rijksmuseum #15, Christie’s Mar. 2000 #139

84E French Facon de Venise Wine Goblet 17th Century

84E French Facon de Venise Wine Goblet 17th Century

WEATHERED ARCHAEOLOGICAL GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 13, 2017

Weathered archaeological glass can it be cleaned ? Yes but read the caveat

22r-after-second-cleaning-1

22R after second cleaning

(The following link will take you a procedure for cleaning weathered archaeological glass)

SEALED ARYBALLOS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 12, 2017

SEALED ROMAN ARYBALLOS of  Hans van Rossum

2nd – 3rd century AD | probably the northern Black Sea region

Size↑9.6 cm | (including dot of plaster) ø 7.8 cm | Weight 68 g

 

Technique:Free blown, handles applied

Classification: Isings 1957 form 61 (variant) | Sorokina 1987 rim type A, handles type C4

Description: A pale to light green glass aryballos, squat globular body, indented base, no pontil mark. Rim folded outward and inward. Two handles in green glass. The mouth sealed with a dot of plaster. Very rare. One handle applied on the shoulder, drawn up, folded and attached to the middle of the neck.

Condition: A small restoration at the shoulder, part of the rim and neck broken in antiquity, probably by the Roman glassworker or the owner. Some slightly incrustation.

Remarks I: Till 11 December 2007 this aryballos was part of the collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art (USA), accession-number 79.601. After December 2007 it was deaccessioned by the museum, together with some other artifacts and works of art. The aryballos has been sold by Leslie Hindman Auctioneers on 2 February 2009 during the Furniture and Decorative Arts Sale as lot no. 889. The new owner not only cleaned the exterior of the glass but unfortunately he also tried to remove the unique stopper. He thought this dot of plaster came into being after an ”explosion” in the Roman tomb as a consequence of a chemical reaction, caused by the content of the aryballos. Happily he did not succeed and stopped his effort, probably after he noticed the rim was already broken. The way in which the plaster is following the line of the rim the conclusion can be made that rim and neck were undoubtedly already damaged in Roman times. After this damage the Roman owner did not throw the aryballos away but he used or re-used it again. Instead of a bronze stopper or a stopper of a wad of fabric or plaster, which was no longer an option now, he used plaster to cover de mouth totally. Chemical formula of plaster: CaS04.2H20. Confirmed by XRF-analysis (X-Ray Fluorescence), on 4 February 2011 by Restaura – Haelen (NL).

Remarks II: The way in which the glass worker fixed the other handle is not only unusual but rare too. He started, as usual, on the shoulder with a dot of glass, after toking the glass upward it was broken. So he had to decide very quickly, as long as the glass was hot, what to do. He started again but now by attaching the glass to the neck first, bringing the glass coil downward, made even the usual fold and attached the handle to the dot of glass on the shoulder. Generally speaking the glass coil is thick on the place the glassworker starts making handles, and that is on the shoulder. The second handle however shows the thicker part of the coil on the neck side and that is undeniably the evidence for the problems the glassworker was confronted with. Author is not known with any identical example of a handle applied in an opposite way as a consequence of what happened to this glassworker. Another interesting aspect of this aryballos is the presence of a rest of the original liquid in the interior. Slightly indented base, no pontil mark. The relatively big handles for an aryballos, together with the shape of the body and the rim are specific characteristics for a production in the northern Black Sea region. (Sorokina 1987, pp. 40-41)

Provenance: London art market, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers 2 February 2009, lot no. 889 Indianapolis Museum of Art USA, accession number 79.601, Collection Lt. Jacob F. Baker USA, acquired in the 1960s

Published: Magazine VIND (NL) no. 23 – 2016, p. 29 Vormen uit Vuur, no. 220 – 2013, p. 1 Romeins Glas uit particulier bezit, J. van der Groen & H. van Rossum 2011, p. 103 De Oude Flesch, no. 121, 2010, p. 24 Leslie Hindman Auctioneers 2 February 2009, lot no. 889

Exhibited: Thermenmuseum Heerlen (NL), Romeins Glas, geleend uit particulier bezit, no. 186 29 April – 28 August 2011

Reference: Necropolis ”Sovkhoz-10” (Southwest Crimea), Chersonesus, Archaeological Museum, accession number 1.962 for a similar example Glass from the Roman Empire, P.E. Cuperus no. PEC 107, p. 48 (for the sealinGlass of the Millennia, Arte Primitivo 6 March 2002, lot 52 (for the sealing)

Drs. M. Zilverberg, expert on Roman Glass, Netherlands

Drs. M. Zilverberg, expert on Roman Glass, Netherlands

Kunst & Kitsch (Antiques Road Show) in the City Hall of Middelburg on 29 September 2014 with drs. Mieke Zilverberg, expert on Antiquities and Roman Glass. Broadcast on TV on 1 April 2015

SINGLE KUTTROLF FROM THE MIDDLE AGES

Posted in 3. European Glass, Medieval Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 10, 2017

Single Kuttrolf

Remarks: The Kuttrolf, mainly from Germany in the 16th C, is a beaker commonly found with several glass tubes, sometimes twisted, forming the neck having a cup-like upper container.  The example here represents a variant with a single open neck. The lower part of this beaker has a pushed in base and pontil mark.

Condition: broken and repaired

H: 18 cm

D: C. 1560

Ref: Christies Interiors, Sept. 2013 Lot # 199, Henkes, Glass Without Gloss, 1994, #27.2, Baumgartner, Phoenix aus Sand and Asche, 1988 #383, Baumgartner, Amend & Collection, 2005, #64,65 (double)

Provenance: Collection of E. Martin Wunsch

120E Single Kuttrolf

120E Single Kuttrolf

SPANISH WINE GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 9, 2017

SPANISH WINE GLASS

Remarks: Probably from Cataluña the maker of this wine glass took his influence from English wines of similar form.  Of straw tint, the transparent thin-walled bowl is funnel shaped on a hollow inverted baluster stem.  The rippling in the foot shows that it consists of two layers of glass, with one collapsed upon the other.

H: 12.5

Date: C. 1785

Condition: excellent, undamaged

Ref. Frothingham, Spanish Glass, 1960 plate 39A, Philippart, Fragil Transparencia, 3011, P. 142 (ribbed)

Provenance: Collection of J. Anthony Stout

121 E Spanish Wine Glass H: 12.5 cm D: 1785

121E Spanish Wine Glass H: 12.5 cm D: 1785

A PAIR OF MATCHING ROEMERS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 7, 2017

A PAIR OF MATCHING ROEMERS

46e-ab-pair-of-matching-roemers-a

H: 12.5 cm Late 17th to Early 18th Century

These two dark green Roemers seem to have been made in the same glasshouse and from the same batch of glass.  The bowl is plain, rounded and attached to a small open stem decorated with raspberry prunts.  The large spiral foot is made of a thick glass thread giving these examples a balanced symmetry.

Ref: Dexel #135, Frankfurt p. 110, Encyclopedia-Phillips p. 104

LARGE GREEN ROEMER

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on February 5, 2017

Large Green Roemer

31E Large Roemer H: 15.5 cm Date: Late 17th Century

H: 15.5 cm Date: Late 17th Century

The bowl on this tall Roemer is large and plain. The open stem is decorated with raspberry prunts and connected to a spiral foot made from a glass thread. A beautiful intact example of a late 17th century wine glass. This glass is very to similar 58E which is slight larger 15.8 cm.

 

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