Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

HELLENISTIC CORE-FORMED AMPHORISKOS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 11, 2017

HELLENISTIC CORE-FORMED AMPHORISKOS of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

 

2nd – 1st century BC. Eastern Mediterranean, possibly Syrian or Cypriote.

H: 14.3 cm. Dmax: 4.2 cm. Drim: 2.1 cm. Dbase: 2.3 cm. Weight 110 gr.

 

Classification: Grose 1989: Class III:E. Form III:4.

Condition: Intact. Glossy surface.

Technique Core-formed. Rim-disk, handles, pad-base, and threads applied and tooled.

Description: Translucent pale blue ground, appearing black. Opaque white and opaque grayish blue decoration. Translucent green handles. Narrow rim-disk, tooled outward from the neck and sloping slightly inward. Moderately tall cylindrical neck tapering upward and slightly widening downward into a bag-shaped body with rounded carination above the convex pointed bottom. Circular pale blue broad pad-base with rounded edges, flat on the underside. Two tall vertical, S-shaped coil handles in translucent pale green attached to the base of the neck, making a loop and re-attached at the same place, running up along the neck, making a second, larger loop and attached to neck under rim-disk. An opaque white and an opaque grayish blue thread attached to the neck under the rim-disk and wound clockwise in a regular spiral around neck and body to just above the pad-base. Both threads marvered and dragged six times up and six times down to create a feather pattern around two-thirds of the body.

Remarks: The grayish blue color of the thread decoration on a black-appearing background is a very rare combination for this type of vessel. This amphoriskos belongs to the more slender variant of the type compared with the ones with a more rounded (lower) body.

Provenance: Sheppard & Cooper Ltd., London.

Published: Groen & Rossum 2011, Romeins glas uit particulier bezit , p. 18. Christies 3 July 1996, No. 353.

References: Grose 1989, Toledo Museum, Nos. 180-181. Saldern 1968, Boston Museum, No. 2. Hayes 1975, Royal Ontario Museum, No. 38. Stern & Schlick-Nolte 1994, Ernesto Wolf Collection, No. 62. Christie’s 5/6 March 1985, Kofler-Truniger Collection, No. 289. Sotheby’s 7 July 1994, Benzian Collection, No. 32. Lightfoot 2016, Yunwai Lou Collection, No 31.

 

“SPEYER BOTTLE”, ROMAN GLASS BOTTLE WITH DOLPHIN HANDLES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 10, 2017

SPEYER BOTTLE

Remark: The world’s oldest unopened bottle of wine, was discovered during the excavation (1867) of a Roman nobleman’s tomb, near Speyer, Germany. Of the six glass bottles in the woman’s sarcophagus and the ten vessels in the man’s sarcophagus, only one still contained a liquid. From Ticia Verveer @ticiaverveer in a tweet with a picture.  The “Speyer bottle”, sits comfortably in the Wine Museum section of the Historical Museum of the Palatinate in Speyer, Germany.

A Roman glass mold-blown vessel like this is called a “dolphin handles bottle” with the cracked-off rim.  Late 3rd-4th C.  Below are two empty examples of this type of bottle both with the same dulling, creamy white weathering, and iridescence. Most of these vessel are of clear light green glass . The first from The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the second from The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass.

 

English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 9, 2017

English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

                97E-A English Green Wine with an Opaque Twist

Remark: This green wine has a cup-shaped bowl, set on knop with three raspberry prunts, above a clear stem enclosing a double-series opaque-twist and domed foot.

H: 15cm

c. 1765

English Green Opaque Twist Wine

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 8, 2017

English Green Opaque Twist Wine

97E-B English Green White Twist Wine

                                                                 97E-B English Green White Twist Wine

Remark: This green wine has a cup-shaped bowl, set on a knop with three raspberry prunts, above a clear glass stem enclosing a double-series opaque-twist and domed foot.
H: 15cm
D: 1765
Ref: Bonhams Nov. 30, 2011 #120, Bonhams Dec. 17, 2008 # 286,
Bickerton # 1155

SINGLE KUTTROLF FROM THE MIDDLE AGES

Posted in 3. European Glass, Medieval Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 7, 2017

A Rare Single Kuttrolf

120E Single Kuttrolf

120E Single Kuttrolf

Remarks: The Kuttrolf, mainly from Germany in the 16th C, is a beaker commonly found with several glass tubes, sometimes twisted, forming the neck having a cup-like upper container.  The example here represents a variant with a single open neck. The lower part of this beaker has a pushed in base and pontil mark.

Condition: broken and repaired

H: 18 cm

D: C. 1560

Ref: Christies Interiors, Sept. 2013 Lot # 199, Henkes, Glass Without Gloss, 1994, #27.2, Baumgartner, Phoenix aus Sand and Asche, 1988 #383, Baumgartner, Amend Collection, 2005, #64,65 (double)

Provenance: Collection of E. Martin Wunsch

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF BLUE ROMAN GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 4, 2017

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF BLUE ROMAN GLASS

 

Hans van Rossum

ROMAN BLUE RIBBED BOWL (zarte Rippenschale)

8H ROMAN BLUE RIBBED BOWL

MINIATURE AMPHORA

SQUAT CARINATED ROMAN BOTTLE

ROMAN SQUAT CARINATED BLUE BOTTLE

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROMAN OPAQUE BLUE GLASS JUG

HEXAGONAL BOTTLE WITH FLORAL MOTIFS

ROMAN MEDALLION WITH THE HEAD OF MEDUSA

Medusa Roman Glass Medallion NFB 301

David Giles

 

OPAQUE BLUE ROMAN BUD VASE

OPAQUE BLUE ROMAN GLASS BUD VASE

 

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

BLUE JUGLET WITH CYMBALS

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AMPHORISKOS

roman-amphoriskos

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Blue Roman Glass Unguentarum

Blue Roman Glass Unguentarum1

 CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE

CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

ROYAL BLUE RIBBED UNGUENTARIUM

Royal blue ribbed unguentarium Roman bottle

HEAD-SHAPED BOTTLE

HEAD-SHAPED BOTTLE

 

SIDONIAN FLASK WITH OPAQUE HANDLES

SIDONIAN FLASK WITH OPAQUE HANDLES

 

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

 

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

BLUE ROMAN BOTTLE

17R Roman blue bottle 1st Century

Roman Glass Marbled Pear Shaped Bottle

54R Roman marbled blue bottle 1st Century 5.6 cm

Core-Formed Alabastron

26R Core formed alabastron 6th-4th BC

ROMAN GLASS EXHIBITION AT THE THERMAN MUSEUM IN HEERLEN, HOLLAND

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 1, 2017

Roman Glass Exhibition in Heerlen, Holland 2011

 

An exhibition of Roman glass was at the Therman Museum in Heerlen from April 29th until August 28th 2011.  Heerlen is a city in the southern part of Holland, close to the border of Germany.  The Museum derives its name from the ruins of a Roman bathhouse on which it stands. This location is an ideal place for this event which consists of almost 300 glass objects drawn entirely from private collections.  The objects are arranged around themes such as tableware, packaging and transport, and bathing.  Several rare objects will be included in the exhibition such as a beaker with four panels showing mythological figures, an opaque glass bottle with the image of the Greek warrior Ajax and the most important piece in the show a glass jug made by the master glassblower Ennion.  Accompanying the exhibition was an wonderful illustrated book with about 200 photographs by Tom Haartsen. The museum may still have copies: http://www.thermenmuseum.nl/en

Below are overviews of exhibition, the glass photos in the book are wonderful:

SMALL ONE HANDLED BARREL ROMAN GLASS JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 29, 2017

SMALL ONE HANDLED BARREL JUG of  The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

 

Date: 2nd – 3rd Century AD,  Gaul or Rhineland  Size: H  8.6 cm.  D  4.2 cm

Classification: Isings (1957) form 89, Morin-Jean, form 132, Kisa, form 268,Goethert-Polaschek form 121

Provenance: Private collection Cologne (Germany)

Description:  Greenish, almost colorless, transparent little jug. Cylindrical body divided in three parts, shaped and decorated as a barrel with four continuous horizontal ribs above as well as below. The plain middle section slightly convex. Blown in a two-part mold, nearly flat bottom, no inscription. Free-blown cylindrical neck with rim folded out, round and in, flattened. From shoulder vertically drawn up a delicate flat strap handle (in same color as body) turned in horizontally and then with a loop attached to the rim.

Condition: Completely intact, numerous pinprick bubbles (at one side also two larger glass bubbles). Faint silver and yellow/purple iridescence.

Remarks: Barrel jugs (also called FRONTINUS bottle) as a separate variant on cylindrical bottles are typical for a production in North-West Gaul and the Rhineland, but they are also occasionally found in tombs in the Anglo-Saxon area, Belgium, Switzerland and the Netherlands.

According to the Roman historian Pliny (23-79 AD) barrel jugs were a specialty of the peoples in the Northern part of the Roman Empire. These wooden vessels probably served for the storage of wine. Another writer (Strabo 19 BC- 19 AD) also pointed out that the Gauls were skillful in making wooden barrels and that reliefs of sculpture from Gaul witnesses of everyday use. Duval suggests that the shape of the bottles may be inspired by the Gallo-Roman God Succellus. This was (even thought in the Celtic times) the God of the agriculture and alcoholic drinks such as wine and beer. The God was depicted with a large hammer (like a wooden barrel) and in the other hand a kind of barrel (olla).

The first glass specimens have been found from the end of the 1st /early 2nd century AD (Isings), the production runs through until the 4th century. Typical are the ridges or grooves on the body, almost always in an equal number of both above and below. In between ian obvious bulging, thus suggesting a keg of which the staves are held together by hoops.  The number of grooves or ribs varies depending on the size of the bottle. The smallest have twice four, the largest seven above and below. Most found jugs (as between 17 and 21 cm high) have five or six. As always there are exceptions: in the collection of the Römisch-Germanisches Museum in Cologne is a small jug (12.6 cm) with four grooves above and six below.

In Isings type 89 globally two groups are differentiated: a. blue-green glass, two handles, larger dimension, usually bottom brand, dating 2nd-4th century AD and b.  virtually colorless glass, one handle, small size, usually no bottom brand, early 3rd-4th century AD (Sennequier). Yet this distinction is not entirely decisive, because at some finds there are also variants in terms of color and dating within these two groups founds. For example, some minor barrel jugs have been found in a 2nd century context. There also is a variant (Rhineland) with a separate extra decoration on the belly (tiny balls or grain of sand)

Capacity: Roman measures of the most common bottles and the conversion liters:

1.5 cyathii                                                           0.068 liter (like the above jug from the Windmill collection) varying in height from 8.2 -11.5 cm

0.5 sextarii (6 cyathii)                                     0.27 liter

1.5 sextarii                                                          0.8 liter

2.0 sextarii                                                          1.078 liter

3.0 sextarii                                                          1,62 liter

4.0 sextarii                                                          2.25 liter (rare)

 

Sennequier: further notes that possibly not only the size determines the use. Maybe they were commercially designed, so the form could exclusively be linked to one particular drink.  As today for example Coca-Cola in its characteristic form.

Most barrel jugs have a brand name at the bottom. It is not entirely sure if this is the name of a glassblower or maybe the owner of the workshop or the merchant.  By the excavations in the 19th century (Abbé Cochet) in Normandy (France) initially was supposed that the center of manufacturing lay in the Forest d’Eu (Seine-Maritime), other scientists also included Boulogne, Beauvais, Gallia Belgica and Cologne as possible workshops where this form would have been produced. Some assume that in North-West Gaul was a kind of headquarters, with branches in the far area. The owner then makes use of its own or glassblower (derived) brand. There would thus be no question of a monopoly position.

In connection with the frequent occurrence of the name FRONTINUS barrel jugs also are referred to with the general name FRONTINUS. There are many variants on FRONTINUS known as FRO, FRON, FRONTI FROTI and others, these are mainly found in France. There are also other marks such as Q CASUS NOCTURNUS, FELIX (FE) and PROMETHEUS. The brand EQVA (with variants) occurs in the area around Cologne, such as Hambach Forst and was not found in France. The production in the Rhineland seems to be of a slighter later date as in Gaul, as shown by the museums of Bonn, Cologne, Duisburg, Worms, Speyer, Trier and Mainz.

As said before small bottles with one handle usually have no bottom brand. The first little ones with an brand have a size from about (11.5 cm high). Sennequier points out that this type is rarely found.

It is assumed that the content of barrel jugs was wine but this is absolutely not sure. The fragility of the glass close reuse virtually out. The glass is generally good, sometimes lumps and impurities in the surface The bottles found in Haute-Normandie (blue-green), often with only one handle, can be dated from 1st century end to end 3rd century and are of good quality. They are replaced by bottles (3rd-4th century) with two handles, these have a slightly different chemical composition and are of significantly lower quality (Sennequier ). Because most bottles were found in graves the use of them have been associated with burial rituals. The vast majority is found in women graves, the really small ones sometimes in a children’s grave as for example in Poitiers (France) where a little barrel jug (7.5 cm high) was placed in a stone sarcophagus (mid 2nd century AD) to the left of the head.

Reference

Römisch-Germanisches Museum Cologne;  Musée Carnavalet  Paris (8.9 cm); Metropolitan Museum New York (11.6 cm); Staatliche Kunstsammlung Kassel (10.8cm); Musée Départemental de Seine-Maritime (8.2 cm); Verres Antiques et de l’Islam, Demeulenaere collection (8.8cm).

 

Pictures made by Aad van den Born

MYTHOLOGICAL ROMAN BEAKER

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 28, 2017

MYTHOLOGICAL ROMAN BEAKER of Nico F. Bijnsdorp

Late first century AD. Eastern Mediterranean.
H = 12.0 cm. D rim = 6.6 cm. D base = 4.4 cm. Weight 98 gr.

Classification: Weinberg 1972: Group 1.

Condition: Intact. Very crisp relief. Minute chips to rim. Some iridescence and incrustation.

Technique: Blown in a five-part mold with four vertical sections and base plate.

Description: Semi transparent light olive-green yellowish colored glass. Slightly everted cut-off rim with ground lip. Straight walls tapering slightly towards the flat base with a raised ring-and-dot motif. The walls decorated in relief in a frieze between 1.5 cm below rim and 1.5 cm above base, comprising four panels, separated by plain columns with stepped bases and tall capitals that widen towards their tops. Above panels gabled tops in the form of triangles in raised outline. Each panel contains one figure standing on surrounding string course and facing right: (A): woman wearing a himation (cloak) over a long chiton, holding the hind legs of a dead boar in her down-stretched right hand and carrying a staff on her left shoulder from which two birds in the front and a hare in the rear are hanging. (B): nude male carrying dead calf upside down on his left shoulder. (C): male wearing a chitoniskos and chlamys with a vessel in his right hand and staff or sickle in left hand. (D): male with closely cropped hair, holding caduceus in his right hand and purse or tortoise shell in his left hand.

Remarks: G.D. Weinberg (1972) and K.B. Wight (1994) divided mythological beakers into four groups, this beaker belonging to group 1, that consists of some ten examples, most of them in museum collections (e.g. British Museum, Corning Museum, National Museum Athens, Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf). It is suggested, that the iconography on the beaker represents (A) as personification of Winter, (B) as Hercules, (C) as Hymen or personification of Summer and (D) as Mercury and that it refers to the wedding procession of Peleus and Thetis. These beakers have possibly been gifts at ceremonial occasions or served as ritual vessels.

Provenance: Ex Armand Trampitsch Collection, Paris 1960’s.

Published: Christie’s 7 October 2010, No. 54., Romeins Glas uit particulier bezit, J. v.d. Groen & H. van Rossum, p. 36-37.

Reference: Whitehouse 2001, Corning Museum, No. 527., Harden 1968, British Museum, No. 64.
Saldern 1980, Hans Cohn Collection, No. 46., Israeli 2011, The Shlomo Moussaieff Collection, p. 79.
Sotheby’s 4/5 June 1979, The Constable-Maxwell Collection, No. 143.

Enameled Roemer (Ray’s Roemer)

Posted in 3. European Glass, Bohemian Glass, Enameled Glass, Roemers by Allaire Collection of Glass on November 26, 2017

Enameled Roemer (Ray’s Roemer)

This Victorian enameled roemer was made in Europe and possibly decorated by the Bohemian glass-worker and designer Kolo L. Moser. It was given to us by a dear friend.

H: 4 ½ inches

1890-1910

57E Enamelled Roemer

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