Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

BLUE GLASS: ANCIENT TO MODERN

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 13, 2019

The chemistry behind making blue glass is complex.  The simple answer is finely powdered oxides of cobalt or copper are added to the glass batch.  Almost from the very beginnings of glass manufacture the color blue has been a chosen hue.  Beginning with a core-formed piece from 4th to 6th Century BC and ending with an example made by John Nygren from the studio glass movement of the early 1980’s.

 

 

 

Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden REVISITED

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 12, 2019

 

 The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden is having an new exhibition of their glass May 3th to September 1st 2019

Glassmakers from antiquity were exceptionally adept at making the most beautiful shapes and colors. The Glass exhibition reflects their craftsmanship. You will see a selection of the most beautiful glass from the museum collection, which comes from Egypt, the Classic world and the Netherlands. For the gourmets among the art lovers.

In the exhibition you will see some of the earliest glass objects from ancient Egypt, such as cosmetic bottles and amulets. Also Roman glass, bracelets from the European Iron Age (the ‘La Tene period’), jewelery, gems, play stones, Greek glass, special Merovingian cups and some early Islamic glasses are among the highlights.

The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (active link to their web page) is the best national archaeological museum of the Netherlands. It is located in Leiden. The Museum grew out of the collection of Leiden University and still closely co-operates with its Faculty of Archaeology. This archaeology museum has one of the finest glass collections in the Netherlands.  The collection has pre-Roman, Roman, Merovingian with other groups from the Migration Period, Middle Ages, and other periods.  (active link to slide show of collections)

 

 

Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden REVISITED

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 9, 2019

The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (active link to their web page) is the best national archaeological museum of the Netherlands. It is located in Leiden. The Museum grew out of the collection of Leiden University and still closely co-operates with its Faculty of Archaeology. This archaeology museum has one of the finest glass collections in the Netherlands.  The collection has pre-Roman, Roman, Merovingian with other groups from the Migration Period, Middle Ages, and other periods.  (active link to slide show of collections)

 The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden is having an new exhibition of their glass May 3th to September 1st 2019

Glassmakers from antiquity were exceptionally adept at making the most beautiful shapes and colors. The Glass exhibition reflects their craftsmanship. You will see a selection of the most beautiful glass from the museum collection, which comes from Egypt, the Classic world and the Netherlands. For the gourmets among the art lovers.

In the exhibition you will see some of the earliest glass objects from ancient Egypt, such as cosmetic bottles and amulets. Also Roman glass, bracelets from the European Iron Age (the ‘La Tene period’), jewelery, gems, play stones, Greek glass, special Merovingian cups and some early Islamic glasses are among the highlights.

Below are some of our favorite glasses from this wonderful collection.

 

 

HELLENISTIC CAST GLASS KANTHAROS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 7, 2019

HELLENISTIC CAST GLASS KANTHAROS

From The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

 

Hellenistic cast glass Kantharos

                                                                                                                                                                                   

Date: Late 3rd – mid 2nd century B.C. , region around the Black Sea (the Crimea) or Italy  Size: H = 8.3 cm D = 9.7 cm (rim),  15.5  cm (incl.handles)

Provenance: Collection David Giles London (UK), ex coll. S. Antonoshkin (Germany)

Description: This drinking cup (assembled from multiple pieces) is constructed of light-opaque to transparent virtually colorless thick glass with a greenish-gray tint. The oval almost egg-shaped body is cast in a mold, simultaneously with the grips and the conically tapered foot. The integral handles have flat, concave sided thumb rests, horizontally aligned with the rim of the kantharos. On the vessel’s tooling, the orifices  in the handles, their further  details  and feet were finished by chiseling. Subsequently the cup was  ground and polished on a lathe (N.F. Bijnsdorp 2010).  The drinking cup is designed to be held with the thumb, forefinger and middle finger.

Remarks: The word ‘ kantharos ‘ is probably derived from the ancient Greek word for ‘ beetle ‘, an indication for the edited handles. This type of glass is, as with many other forms of the time, an imitation of metal i.e. gold, silver and bronze cups. Early Kantharoi from the Hellenistic period are not numerous. They distinguish themselves from the so-called Skyphoi as type that normally have a less oval body and a lower foot. Furthermore, in publications and also some descriptions in museums both terms are used interchangeably.

The period is designated as ‘ Hellenistic ‘ overall from 330 to 50 B.C. at the beginning of the Roman Empire. After the death of Alexander the Great in the year 323 emerged led by Macedonian Greek generals various Hellenistic kingdoms.

The second half of the third century B.C. (with a passage on to the second century) creates a separate Hellenistic glass-style. This first group is best represented by important and documented finds in the Hellenistic colony Canosa di Puglia, on the Adriatic coast in South East Italy. In various tombs in Canosa (Canusium) is cast monochrome glassware found, that can be considered as the first joint effort of glass makers in ancient times to almost complete dinner sets to manufacture, both before serving of food or drinking from cups. Just as before in Achaemenid Persia is here only a production of luxury items, what is underlined by the extraordinary design, elegance, quality and overall accuracy of the manufacturing process. Virtually all glasses are discolored on purpose in an effort to achieve transparency, but often this resulted in a yellowish-green tint. Only in rare cases (such as the example in The British Museum) a blue cup was made (Grose 1989).

It has long been believed that these types would be manufactured in Alexandria (Egypt). Multiple finds of colorless glass (in addition to Canosa di Puglia, Etruria, Naxos and Morgantina in Sicily and Reggio di Calabria) point out, however, that not only South Italy (Magna Graecia) can be classified as possible production location, but also the Mediterranean area and around the Black Sea (the Crimea).

This kantharos belongs to the main monochrome forms of the so-called Canosa-group.

References: An identical cup is in the British Museum in London (coll.nr. 1871.0518.9), dated 200 – 225 BC.), coming from a tomb in Canosa di Puglia, Italy. Found in 1871 together with 8 other glass from the period 275 – 200 BC. Shown in Masterpieces of Glass, The British Museum (d. Harden 1968 No. 37) Antikes Glas (f. Neuberg 1962   nr. 82) and mentioned in Ancient Glass (D. Harden 1971).

Also in the collection of the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg is a virtually identical drinking cup (1997, cat.nr Kunina. 59, height 9.6 cm, diameter 9.4 cm edge, the slim high foot less tight). This kantharos was found in 1990 in Akhtanizovskaya, in the Krasnodar region. In the same Hermitage collection are 3 more (including a light blue) kantharoi, all significantly later, from the 1st century AD.

Another example from the 2nd century B.C.(height 8.1 cm, diameter 15.7 cm) in Ancient Glass (Charles Ede Ltd London 2006, no.6), formerly in the Brailovski collection and reputedly found in the Crimea.

A special kantharos from the 1st century BC belongs to the collection of the Corning Museum NY (inv.nr. 70.1.29), up to 1908 in the collection of A.Vogell (Germany). This cup measures 9.6 cm high, diameter edge 8.2 cm (14.0 cm incl. handles), the color is transparent deep-blue. → Glass of the Caesars (Harden 1987, no. 14).

MEROVINGIAN GLASS CUPS (6th – 7th C) CONTINUATION OF THE THE PREVIOUS POST

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on January 2, 2019

 

MEROVINGIAN GLASS CUPS (6th – 7th C)

“The most frequent form of cup found from this period is the palm cup. It is a small hemispherical or bell-shaped vessel that would fit in the palm of one’s hand: hence the name “palm cup.” Palm cups may have a plain, fire-polished rim or rim that was folded out and down to produce the appearance of a collar. As with most other varieties of early medieval drinking vessels, cups may be undecorated or have dip-molded ribs or trails.” Taken from the book: Medieval Glass for Popes, Princes, and Peasants by David Whitehouse (2010)

Below are pictures of palm cups from various collections.

 

ADDITIONAL TYPES OF CUPS AND BEAKERS FROM MEROVINGIAN PERIOD 6TH TO 7TH CENTURY

CONTINUATION OF THIS POST

THE ACTIVE LINKS BELOW WILL TAKE YOU TO ADDITIONAL SITES ON ANCIENT GLASS BLOG WITH MORE INFORMATION ON:  EARLY MIDDLE AGES (MIGRATION PERIOD) 5th TO 8th CENTURIES, THE BRITISH MUSEUM: POST ROMAN AND MEROVINGIAN GLASS 5TH – 7TH C, CENTRAL MIDDLE AGES 8-11 CENTURIES, LATE MIDDLE AGES 12th TO 14th CENTURY, MEDIEVAL GLASS For Popes,Princes and Peasants, THE MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY IN SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE and GLASS AT ST GERMAIN, ARCHEOLOGICAL MUSEUM.

THE BRITISH MUSEUM: POST ROMAN AND MEROVINGIAN GLASS 5TH – 7TH C

GLASS OF THE MIDDLE AGES 5th to 15th CENTURY

MEDIEVAL GLASS FOR POPES,PRINCES AND PEASANTS

THE MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY IN SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE

GLASS AT ST GERMAIN, ARCHEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

 

GLASS OF THE EARLY MIGRATION PERIOD 5TH TO 6TH CENTURY

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 31, 2018

 

The Middle Ages in European history is between the decline of the Roman Empire in the 5th century and the dawn of the Renaissance in the 15th century. The Migration period or early Middle Ages is 5th to 8th C.  This post will concentrate on glass made up the 6th C.  Fortunately, the Roman glass maker had local pupils who learned the trade and took care of the continuity in making glass.  Without their Roman over lords these glass makers soon developed their own style and forms. The Franks-Merovingian vessels of the early Migration period will illustrate the change in styling from the decorative man designs. The forms and colors are cruder, less ornamental with simpler shapes.  Also, in the 5th to 6th century in Europe you find glass which is called late is Roman. These glasses have a more Roman styling, decoration and design but at the same time they are not the same classic Roman style found in the 1st to 4th C.

Glass of The Early Migration Period 5th To 6th Century

Nico F. Bijnsdorp collection Merovingian cone beaker Late 5th – early 6th century

Merovingian bag beaker in Rijksmuseum voor Oudheden Leiden 5th to 7th century

 

Lattice pattern Beaker 6-7th C at MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY, CAMBRIDGE UK

 

GALLO-ROMAN GLASS BEAKER

Posted in 2. Ancient Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Roman Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 29, 2018

Gallo-Roman Beaker

115E Gallo-Roman Glass Beaker

H: 11.5 cm
D: 4th –Early 5th Century AD

Gallo-Roman beaker 115E was made in the beginning of the Migration Period in the Western Provinces. The elegantly formed beaker is made of light olive green glass with the conical bottom standing on a flat base ring.  Intact.  Ex: Martin Wunsch collection, NYC.

Ref: David Whitehouse, Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass, Volume 1, #177 P.115, Sotheby’s Nov 20 1987 Lot 133, #81, Memoires de Verre, # 74 P. 40, Verreries Antiques der Musee de Picardie # 319 P. 5

Below is a glass which shows a design change from late Roman to Merovingian. The glass is in The Musee d Archeologie Nationale in St Germain. The museum is a major French archeology museum, covering among other areas Roman and the Merovingian period.

H.C. FRY GLASS CO.

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 27, 2018

H.C. FRY GLASS CO.

In 1901 Henry Clay Fry began the H.C. Fry Glass Co. at Rochester, PA.  This company made complete dinner sets, tea sets and a large variety of heat-resistant oven glassware from 1916 to 1930 under a license from the Corning Glass Works. In the 1920’s they started to manufacture cut glass.   They are also known for their opalescent “Art Glass” called Foval.  The factory closed in 1934.  The following are examples of their heat-resistant dinner sets and tea sets from the Allaire Collection and other sources.

Allaire Collection of Fry Glass

 

 

Below are additional examples from other collections.

 

Blue handle tea set not complete, photo from Cottone Auctions

Green handle tea set not complete , photo from Jeffrey S. Evans @ Associates web page

Opalescent “Art Glass” Foval not complete, photo from Jeffrey S. Evans @ Associates web page

Opalescent tea set not complete, photo from Case Antiques

 

A good book on this type of glass is The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Fry Glassware (Cut Glass, Oven Ware, Art Glass and Kitchen Ware)

by H.C. Fry Glass Society

The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Fry Glassware

 

 

 

VENETIAN FILIGRANA GLASS VASE

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Venetian & Facon de Venise Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 25, 2018

Venetian Filigrana Glass Vase

107E Venetian Filigrana Vase

107E Venetian Filigrana Vase of the Allaire Collection of Glass

 

 

 The pear-shaped body of this Venetian vase is fashioned with two styles of filigrana retortoli canes. The straight neck may have had a lid.  The vessel is decorated with clear glass wing handles, single center trail and ring foot also of clear glass.  A similar object is in the collection in the Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen.

H: 12.7

Date: 1700 Venice

Published: A Collection of Filigrana Glass, Kitty Lameris, 2012 #20

Ref: Coburg #452, HansCohn Collection #201, Golden Age of Venetian Glass #127

Photo: Courtesy of Frides Lameris Art and Antique, Amsterdam

Tagged with: ,

AMERICAN OR ENGLISH GREEN WINE GLASS

Posted in 3. European Glass, CATEGORIES OF GLASS TYPES ON THIS SITE, Early American Glass before 1850, English Glass by Allaire Collection of Glass on December 23, 2018

97E Allaire Collection of Glass H: 3  5/8th  inches   Circa: 1820

This wineglass is blown from brilliant light green lead glass.  It has a circular bowl with heavy tapering cylindrical stem drawn from same gather to a broad circular foot with an in-folded rim.  The wine could be American or English.

Ref: McKearin, 200 Hundred Years of American Blown Glass p 242, plate 61 5&7

Parallels:

Corning Museum of Glass List the wine as American or English 19th century

 

Metropolitan art Museum list the wineglass as from Jersey Glass Co. in Jersey City 1824-1840

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