Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

CORE AND ROD-FORMED EARLY GLASS OBJECTS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 18, 2020

26R Core-Formed Alabastron of Allaire collection

Date:6th -4th Century B.C. H: 9.6 cm

Description: This vessel was manufactured around 6th to 4th Century B.C. using the core-formed method of glassmaking. The shape of this Alabastron was inspired by the common Greek pottery of the period, a form frequently used in core glass. The decoration is also typical using trailed and marveled threads of yellow, turquoise and red.  Glass objects from pre-Hellenistic periods were luxury items, affordable by only the upper class.

Parallels: In the book, Ancient and Islamic Glass, Paris, Loudmer, Kevorkian #327 & 331, The Constable Maxwell Collection #15, The Yale University Art Gallery #23 & 24, Glaser der Antike, Sammlung Erwin Oppenlander, Axel von Saldern #165 Now in J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa.

Remark: Methods of making glass objects came about shortly after natural glass was discovered.  The first glass objects manufactured were not vessels but amulets or pendants and beads. Using the technique of rod forming, tooling and applied elements.  Vessels were made later by core winding (all the rest of the examples shown) from 1500 to 1200 BC. in the Mesopotamia, Egypt and Eastern Mediterranean region.  Production declined between 1200 and 800 but revived from 800 to the 1st century BC. After the introduction of glass blowing by the Syrians 100 BC, the method ceased to be used with few exceptions.  A good scholarly book on this type of glass is Early Ancient Glass, David Grose, Toledo Museum, 1989.

This link is to a short video from Corning Museum of Glass on the core forming method. (http://www.cmog.org/video/core-formed-vase)

Core and Rod-Formed Glass Objects 6th C BC.  To 4th C AD.

from Contributing Collectors on the Blog

(Click on the name of the contributing collector to see information on them and the rest of their collection.)

(To see information on the object pictured click on the active link title above the pictured object.)

From the collection of David Giles active link

FOUR CORE-FORMED GLASS VESSELS FROM 4th to 5th century BC (active link)

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass active link

FOUR CORE-FORMED FISH SHAPED GLASS BEADS (active link)

CARTHAGINIAN HEAD PENDANT

From the collection of Nico F. Bijnsdorp (active link)

CORE-FORMED OINOCHOE active link

 

 ROD-FORMED HEAD PENDANT active link

ROD-FORMED KOHL TUBE WITH STOPPER active link

From the collection of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen (active link)

CORE FORMED ALABASTRON active link

CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE active link

 

SMALL CAN BE BEAUTIFUL, A CORE FORM JUG active link

 

 

 

TALL CYLINDRICAL ROMAN GLASS BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 15, 2020

Tall cylindrical Roman glass bottle

From

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

 

Date: Late 1st – 2nd Century AD,  Roman Empire, possibly Rhineland

Size: ↑ 21.6 cm  │  Ø 9.5 cm

Classification: Isings (1957), form 51b; Fleming (1999),  var. type 91.26.5 (handle)

Provenance: Akanthos Ancient Art, Antwerp (Belgium)

Description: Tall cylindrical mold-blown bottle of transparent blue-green glass. The round body tapers slightly downwards, no pontil mark is visible on the gently curving bottom. The short, compact cylindrical neck and shoulders are blown free, the rim folded out, then up and in. The top of the mouth is rounded after the glass is reshaped outward. The handle is attached to the rounded shoulders that has been pulled up vertically with seven fine ribs and then pressed against the neck with a small bend downwards.

 

Condition: Completely intact

Exhibited: 29-4 / 28-8-2011 Thermenmuseum, Heerlen (The Netherlands),‘Romeins glas, geleend uit particulier bezit’ (expo nr. 209)

Remarks: Cylindrical bottles like this have almost certainly been used for the storage and transportation of liquids. They were mainly manufactured in the western part of the Roman Empire from the end of the 1st century and remained in use until the 3rd century. The color suggests that this bottle was manufactured in Cologne or the surrounding area. Specimens from the Mediterranean region sometimes have grooves cut horizontally. However, in view of the collar rim, production in Cyprus or Asia Minor is also not excluded.

References:       The Yunwai Lou collection of Ancient Glass and Antiquities 2015, nr. 133; Hermitage Museum nr.Vander Groen collection VDG 046

ROMAN SQUARE GLASS JAR

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 12, 2020

Square Glass Jar of Luduvic Deswelle Collection

 

Date: 1st to 3rd century Height: 13.3 cm Diameter: 9 cm max.

 

Description: Blue/green square intact glass jar with folded rim and light iridescence.

 

Classification: Morin-Jean 13; Isings form 62

 

Remarks: This pot was found in 1909 in Bourges (the old Avaricum) France and at that time contained ashes.  It was published for the first time in, “Mémoires de la société des antiquaires du centre” by François Roger (1910).

 

AUBERGINE TWO HANDLED ROMAN GLASS BOTTLE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 9, 2020

25R Aubergine two handled bottle of Allaire collection

Date: First Century, H: 8cm

Remarks: It is from the earlier glass core-form and pottery shapes prior to the First Century that this vessel takes its shape.  The ancient aryballos was a popular shape and copied widely after glass blowing was invented.  This example was beautifully executed using aubergine glass with delicate blue handles. It may have been used as a container for perfume.

Ref:  Glaser der Antike, Sammlung Erwin Oppenlander, Axel von Saldern #541. Now in J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa., Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum, John Hayes, 1975 #12, Hans van Rossum collection and the Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen collection (below)

 

THIN-WALLED ARYBALLOS( active link) of  Hans van Rossum collection

 

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen collection

 

 

ROMAN GLASS AMPHORA (AMPHORISKOS)

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 6, 2020

Roman glass amphora (amphoriskos)

From

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

Date: 1st half 3rd century AD Size: ↑ 10.7 cm  │   Ø 6.3 cm

Description: Free blown dark yellowish amphora (amphoriskos), fairly thick glass, with somewhat stocky body. The long neck (↑ 6 cm) is slightly constricted at the base and flows into a shaped edge. The bulging bottom has a clearly perceptible pontil mark. The two dolphin handles are light green and attached against the neck with an ornate bow.

Remarks: According to a note (sticker on the bottom) by the previous owner this amphora was found in Israel (as well as no. 169 in the Royal Ontario Museum (Hayes). The relatively long neck is characteristic of a bottle from the 1st half of the 3rd century.

Classification:  Isings (1957), form 129 (variant)  Condition: Intact

Provenance: Daniel M. Friedenberg NY (former curator of the Jewish Museum New York)

Reference: Musée du Louvre (Arveiller-Dulong/part II,no.1037; Bonhams auction 5-10-2011 lot no. 215 (with zig-zag decoration);  Royal Ontario Museum (Hayes 1974, no. 169).

 

 

WONDERFUL ANCIENT GLASS EXHIBITION AT RMO IN LEIDEN

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on September 2, 2020

At the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden presently there is an exhibition: Romans along the Rhine, on display from 1 June 2020 to 28 February 2021.

This exhibition is about life in Roman times along the Rhine river which was the border of the Roman territory in the Netherlands.  Part of the show is a wide selection of glassware from the Museum collection and the private collection of  Nico F. Bijnsdorp

(For additional information about RMO Museum and their ancient glass collection click on this active link to a previous post: RIJKSMUSEUM VAN OUDHEDEN IN LEIDEN.)

This post is about the ancient glassware in this new exhibition.

Nico Bijnsdorp Ancient Glass in the show.

HEAD of ROMAN GLASS COCKEREL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 30, 2020

 

HEAD of a COCKEREL of Hans van Rossum

 

 

Date: 4th Century AD | Roman Empire Size: Height 3.8 cm |Weight 196 g

Technique: Free blown; tooled

Description: The head of amber glass; the comb of red glass and the eyes of light blue glass.

Remarks: I Probably part of a complete figure vessel. Roman glass in the shape of an animal is rare.

Remarks: II Dating is based on the use of red glass. This color is known from finds during the first Century AD when it was used in a mosaic plaque, known as: “Birds in Thicket”, formerly part of the Sangiori Collection. Red glass is also known from some glass finds dated to the 4th Century AD as there is a fragment of the ‘Opus Sectile”, a panel with Thomas (second part of 4th Century AD) but red glass was also used for the Cage-Cup, excavated during 1960 at Köln-Braunsfeld and it is part of ”the Masterpiece”, known from the Luxemburger Strasse, Köln. A vessel richly decorated with opaque white, blue and red glass trails. Dating early 4th Century AD. The use of red glass is rare, in combination with this head as a whole makes this piece unique.

Condition: Intact for the head

Provenance: Formerly part of the collection of Mr. C. Sheppard, London 1980s.

Reference: Not any reference good be found

ROMAN GLASS DOUBLE BALSAMARIUM WITH IRIDESCENCE

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 27, 2020

24R Roman glass double balsamarium of Allaire collection

dsc_00051

Date: 4th. to 5th. Century AD Height: 12 cm

Remarks:This elegantly free-blown slender shape is emphasized by the most delicate threaded design which wraps around the entire form. The originally light blue-green glass has developed a brilliant iridescence patina over its surface. Balsamaria from this period were manufactured in single, double and the more elaborate quadruple designs and it is assumed that they were all used for cosmetics.

References : Newark Museum, Auth, 1976, #486, Christie’s March5, 1985 #21, Collection of Monsieur June 1985, #433

 

SINGLE LOOPED HANDLE ROMAN GLASS PITCHER

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 24, 2020

31R Single Handle Pitcher of Allaire Collection

                                                          Date: First Century    Height: 13 cm

 

Remark: The natural color of blue-green glass used on this delicate pitcher has virtually no weathering and appears as it would have looked just after being manufactured in the First Century.  The simple ovoid body is accented by a ring base.  The precise looped handle is beautifully executed with thin ribs and double fold-over at the mouth.

Ref: Ancient Collection De Monsieur D Auction Paris 1985 #477 & 478, Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, Nina Kunina, 1997 #14

Additional Roman jugs with the looped handles on this blog. The looped handle was not a very common decoration on Roman jugs.

Click on the title above the Roman jugs pictured for additional information and on the picture to enlarge.

 

69R TRAILED ROMAN GLASS JUG WITH LOOP HANDLE of Allaire Collection

69R Roman Jug with Loop Handle of Allaire Collection

Hans van Rossum Collection

ROMAN JUG WITH LOOP HANDLE

 

JUGLET WITH TREFOIL LIP AND ZIGZAG TAILING

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

ROMAN GLASS JUG WITH LOOP HANDLE

 

HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN RIBBED BOWL

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on August 21, 2020

30R Hellenistic or Roman Ribbed bowl of the Allaire Collection of Glass

Date: Late First Century B.C. to Mid First Century A.D. Diameter: 13 cm

 

Remarks: This earlier Roman ribbed bowl was probably not made by the direct cast and slumping method.  It may have been formed from a thick round disk. The ribs were formed hot with a pincer tool and then the disk was slumped into a bowl shape. The process is described in this link Ribbed Bowls and their Manufacture by Mark Taylor and David Hill. It is a class of bowls from the from the Eastern Mediterranean area with short, close-set ribs concentrated around the middle of the body.  For the most part, such bowls are naturally colored, either bluish-green or light green, or intentionally decolorized. A small percentage occur in cobalt-blue or other colors. The size of the bowls and thickness of the ribs vary.

Ref: Glass the Eighth Wonder of the Ancient World, Sheppard and Cooper Ltd.  London Feb. 1994 #9,Early Ancient Glass, David Grose, Toledo Museum, 1989 #236

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