Ancient Glass Blog of The Allaire Collection

ROMAN GLASS SPRINKLER FLASK WITH ZIGZAG DECORATION

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 16, 2019

SPRINKLER FLASK WITH RARE ZIGZAG DECORATION of Hans van Rossum

 

 

Date: 3rd – 4th century AD | Eastern Mediterranean Size:↑8.6 cm | ø  6.5 cm | Weight 75 g

Technique: Free blown, tooled; glass coil applied

Condition: Perfect condition, colorful iridescence

Description: Transparent manganese glass for the squat pear-shaped body; cylindrical neck with constriction and inner diaphragm at base to control the pouring and evaporation of the costly liquid within. On the lower part of the shoulder a heavy coil ring of pale opaque green glass is encircling the body, started up with a drop and ending in a thin thread, completing the circle.

The zigzag glass coil decoration started with a drop on the bottom, making a circle by passing the drop, drawn up to make seven zigzag resolutions. The top of the zigzag melted with the encircled coil. Cylindrical neck, flaring mouth; rim folded inward. Indented base, small rest of pontil mark.

Remarks: The way in which this sprinkler flask has been decorated is exceedingly rare or probably                      unique for this type of a sprinkler. Only one, more and less, similar way of decorating could be found, part of a small jug dated in the 4th century AD.

Provenance: Ex collection Mr. an Mrs. Nobili Paris,  collection number 25

Published: Histoire du Verre l’Antiquité, F. Slitine p. 84

Reference: Antiquities and Islamic Works of Art – Glass from the Ray Winfield Smith Collection, Sotheby Parke Bernet Inc, New York, 2 May 1975 lot no. 243 for a small jug with a similar decoration.

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF BLUE ROMAN GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 13, 2019

COLLECTORS EXAMPLES OF BLUE ROMAN GLASS

 

Hans van Rossum

ROMAN BLUE RIBBED BOWL (zarte Rippenschale)

8H ROMAN BLUE RIBBED BOWL

MINIATURE AMPHORA

SQUAT CARINATED ROMAN BOTTLE

ROMAN SQUAT CARINATED BLUE BOTTLE

Nico F. Bijnsdorp

ROMAN OPAQUE BLUE GLASS JUG

 

HEXAGONAL BOTTLE WITH FLORAL MOTIFS

ROMAN MEDALLION WITH THE HEAD OF MEDUSA

Medusa Roman Glass Medallion NFB 301

David Giles

 

OPAQUE BLUE ROMAN BUD VASE

OPAQUE BLUE ROMAN GLASS BUD VASE

 

The Augustinus Collection of Ancient Glass

BLUE JUGLET WITH CYMBALS

_mg_8584

AMPHORISKOS

roman-amphoriskos

Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Blue Roman Glass Unguentarum

Blue Roman Glass Unguentarum1

 CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE

CORE FORMED OEINOCHOE

The Windmill Collection of Roman Glass

ROYAL BLUE RIBBED UNGUENTARIUM

Royal blue ribbed unguentarium Roman bottle

HEAD-SHAPED BOTTLE

HEAD-SHAPED BOTTLE

 

SIDONIAN FLASK WITH OPAQUE HANDLES

SIDONIAN FLASK WITH OPAQUE HANDLES

 

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

Joop van der Groen

PEAR-SHAPED ROMAN GLASS UNGUENTARIUM

The Allaire Collection of Roman Glass

BLUE ROMAN BOTTLE

17R Roman blue bottle 1st Century

Roman Glass Marbled Pear Shaped Bottle

54R Roman marbled blue bottle 1st Century 5.6 cm

Core-Formed Alabastron

26R Core formed alabastron 6th-4th BC

DUTCH JENEVER GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 10, 2019

Dutch Jenever Glass of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Dutch Jenever Glass

Dutch Jenever Glass

Origin: the Netherlands around 1750.

Dimensions: H 17,0 cm.; ø cuppa 7,1 cm.; ø foot 7,4 cm.; weight 130,1 gram.

  Description: This elegant jenever glass is quite rare regarding shape, construction and decoration. Jenever, in the old days written as genever, is the typical strong alcoholic Dutch drink not being the same as gin. The trumpet like cup and stem are made from one take of glass. The MSAT (Multiple Spiral Air Twist) in the stem starts at the bottom of the cup and continues almost to the foot of the glass being the second part of the construction of this glass.  The unique feature to this glass is the incorporation of two graduated bulbous knops.  The foot is slightly conical and the pontil is quite present in sight and feeling. The stem is made out of solid glass.

Material: soda glass.

Parallels: Up to now very few parallels to this glass have been found which strengthens the statement of Frides Laméris when we bought this glass saying that he had rarely seen glasses with this architecture. The closest parallel regarding the shape of the stem is in Bickerton, English Drinking glasses 1675 – 1825 pg. 15 top row second glass from the left. However, the shape of the cuppa of that glass is different from our glass. An engraved parallel was auctioned at Bonhams 17-12-2008, The James Hall Collection, Sale number 16672 lot nr. 120. A rather good parallel was found with O.N. Wilkinson, Manufacture, Style, Uses, pict. 82, having a folded foot and two so called swelling knops iso. the more bulbous knops and the not folded foot of our glass.

Provenance: With Frides Laméris, Amsterdam, In owners collection since 2001

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 7, 2019

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES of  Hans van Rossum

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES

TWO PERFUME BOTTLES

1st – 2nd century AD | Eastern Mediterranean.

Size↑14.8 cm | Weight 26 g | L
Size↑15.0 cm | Weight 14 g | R

Technique: Free blown, tooled

Classification: Barag 1970 type XXI 13

Description: One bottle of transparent bluish-green glass and the other of almost colorless glass, each with two bulges at the base, rim turned outward and then folded inward. Long cylindrical neck. Base slightly indented. No pontil scar.

Condition: Intact with iridescence and some slightly incrustation and weathering.

Provenance: Collection Albert Loncke, Overpelt (B) 1995

Reference: Ancient and Islamic Glass in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, A. Oliver Jr. no. 108
Ancient Glass in the Israel Museum, The Eliahu Dobkin Collection and Other Gifts, Y. Israeli no. 247, Ancient Glass in the Hermitage Collection, N. Kunina no. 366, Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass – Vol. I, D. Whitehouse no. 250, Kunst der Antike, Galerie Günter Puhze Katalog 23 no. 147

FAÇON de VENISE WINE GLASS

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 4, 2019

FAÇON de VENISE WINE GLASS of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Façon de Venise glass, the Netherlands, last Q 16th cent.
H: 15.1 cm.; ø 7 cm., weight 61,7 gram.

Description: This wine glass made from “cristallo” has a rounded funnel cuppa set on a merese which connects to the hollow a-symmetrical, three dimensional and spiralled – “snaked” – stem connecting by a small merese to the slightly conical foot. The stem is decorated with a turquoise snake like ornament from which an extremely small part is missing.

Origin: most probably the Netherlands.

Parallels:
– Pijzel-Dommisse and Eliëns, Glinsterend glas, 1500 jaar Europese glaskunst, pag. 82,
pict. 115, as an example for the snake like structure of the stem,
– Baumgartner, 2005, pag. 196,
– Tait, Venezianisches Glas, Taschenb¸pag. 188 afb. 142, again for the “snake” form,
– Glass in the Rijksmuseum Vol.I pag. 47 afb. 52, pag. 54 afb. 65. This glass is shown upside down
as the foot is missing and a silver dice holder has been mounted on the remaining lower stem part.
The dimensions of this glass are almost identical to the one in our collection.
– Amsterdams Historisch Museum, Willet Holthuysen, pag. 121 afb. 75,
with the same stem as our glass,
– Laméris Frides and Kitty, Venetiaans en Façon de Venise glas 1500-1700
exhibition 1991, page. 121 pict.. 117,. Is almost identical but has a folded rim foot, and has an
engraving. Our glass “escaped” the hands of the engraver.
– Henkes, Glas zonder glans, page.220 nr. 48.1, this for the construction of the stem. He states that the
stem of 48.1 is a build up of a twisted glass bar. This in contradiction with our glass having a twisted
hollow stem.
– Falkenhof Museum, Rheine, Glas funde aus einem unterirdischen kanalsystem
Band 1, stamfragment nr. 100 pag. 249, large picture on pag. 252-253. This catalogue is most
interesting as it holds recent discoveries.

Provenance:
– With Frides Laméris,
– In the owner’s collection since 2009

POINTED UNGUENTARIUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on July 1, 2019

POINTED UNGUENTARIUM of Joop van der Groen

282. inv.nr. 10-03 (2-TH2)

Roman Empire │ 1st century AD, probably 1st half
Size: ↑ 12,6 cm; Ø max. 2,5 cm; Ø rim 1,9 cm. │ Weight: 74 gram

Technique: Free blown. Tooled.
Classification: Isings (1957) form 9
Descripton: Transparent purple coloured glass. Tall neck, tapering gently inward to the top. Funnel-shaped mouth with a rounded rim. The neck swells slightly to form a small body before tapering to form a point.
Condition: Intact
Remarks: This form has been found in the western and in the eastern part of the Empire. The size can differ very much, from 7 cm up to 22 cm.
The basic colour of Roman glass is bluish-green. This has been caused because sand (the main element for making raw glass) has been polluted by iron oxide. By addition of some percents manganese oxide in the raw glass the colour changed into purple / aubergine.
Provenance: 2001 – 2009 P. Cuperus , Laren (NL), no. PEC045
2001 Jean-David Cahn AC, Basel (SW)
Published: Glass from the Roman Empire (P. Cuperus, 2009)
Reference: Solid Liquid (Fortune Fine Arts Ltd New York, 1999), nos. 85, 86 and 87; The Fascination of Ancient Glass – Dolf Schut Collection (M. Newby & D. Schut, 1999), no. 54;
Vom Luxuxobjekt zum Gebrauchsgefäss – Vorrömische und römische Gläser (Honroth, 2007), nos. 69 and 70; Fascinating Fragility – A Private Collection of Ancient Glass (Bijnsdorp, 2010), no. NFB 022; Roman and Early Byzantine Glass – a Private Collection (van Rossum, 2014), no. HVR 114

ROMAN CUP CALLED ACETABULUM

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 27, 2019

Acetabulum

Romans often drank a mixture of vinegar and water and had a special container for this called an acetabulum. This is from the Latin acetum (vinegar) and abulum the suffix denoting a small vessel.   Today the word is used only as a medical term to describe the cup-like shape in your hip that the thigh bone sits in. Usually made of pottery, some in the first Century, as in this example were made of glass and often found in Italian graves.  Below are three examples.

PLEASE CLICK ON TITLE TO READ EXPLANATORY TEXT TO THE GLASS.

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ROMAN COBALT BLUE ACETABULUM

ACETABULUM

Roman Glass Acetabulum

ROMAN GLASS CUP (ACETABULUM)

61R Small cup (acetabulum) 1st Century

SPANISH FAÇON de VENISE GLASS SERVING FLASK

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 24, 2019

SPANISH FAÇON de VENISE GLASS SERVING FLASK of Elisabeth & Theo Zandbergen

Spanish Façon de Venise Glass Server Flask

Spanish Façon de Venise Glass Serving Flask

Origin: Spain – Cataluña, end of the 17th century.
Dimensions: Size↑24,2 cm.; ø 11,8 cm.; ø outlet 3 cm.; weight 240 gram; capacity 1285 ml.

Description: This is a beautiful free blown serving flask. It is an example of Façon de Venise glass which has been made in Spain possibly by glassmakers who emigrated from Altare or escaped from Venise. The decoration has still the characteristics of Venetian glass with the spiraling decorations in white opaque glass (tin oxide). It is also probable that this object was made in Cadalso in the time Dieudonné Lambotte who emigrated from Flanders to Cadalso was working there. Would it be possible that this object was made by Lambotte himself? Who knows. Looking at the architecture of the object the assumption could be correct. One of the ingredients to make such beautiful clear glass came from Spain, the so called barilla. A soda made from salicornia giving a sodium basis iso. of the more commonly used potassium based soda. It is well known that the Venetians preferred barilla to make their famous light and clear glass. They even tried in those days to grow the salicornia in the brackish swamps close to Venice as the supply was not always dependable.  The decoration with the tin-oxide white opaque glass bands was very much en vogue in those days and is called vetro a fili. The Spanish and Italian glassmakers were real masters in those techniques. See the catalogue “A Collection of Filigrana glass, by Kitty Laméris 2014.

Material: soda glass

Parallels: Zerwick, “A short history of Glass” pag. 55, pict. 44

Provenance: With Peter Korf de Gidts, Amsterdam In owners collection since 2004

EARLY ROMAN JUG

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 21, 2019

EARLY ROMAN JUG of  Hans van Rossum

Early Roman Jug

Early Roman Jug

Second part of 1st century AD | Roman Empire, probably north Italy

Seize↑11.8 cm | ø body 8.4 cm | ø mouth 6.5 cm | Weight 85 g

Technique: Free blown, bifurcated handle applied; tooled

Classification: Isings form 56a | For the handle: Fleming 1999 type MS 5254

Description: Light green glass, bulbous body; squat cylindrical neck. Wide mouth, rim
unworked, folded as trefoil lip. Bifurcated handle, applied on shoulder, drawn up
and attached below the rim in a fold and at right angles. The fold resembles a thumb-
rest. Slightly indented base with no rest of pontil.

Condition: Intact, incredible rainbow colored iridescence

Remarks: This jug is the earliest form of a imitation of well known bronze oenochoë, it has a
simple concave base; the bifurcated handle is a characteristic for a production in the
end of the first to first part of the second century. The unworked rim is a
characteristic for a production in Italy. The earliest specimen comes from a pre-
Flavian grave at Este. The same form is known from Pompeii. (Isings 1957)

Provenance: Private Collection USA, 2014

Reference: Vetri antichi del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Este, A. Toniolo no. 269
Vetri antichi del Museo archeologico al Teatro Romano di Verona e di altre collezioni
veronesi, G. M. Facchini no. 377 & 378
Vetri antichi delle Province di Belluno, Treviso e Vicenza, C. Casagrande-F.Ceselin no. 149
Les Verres antiques du Musée du Louvre, II, V. Arveiller & M-D. Nenna no. 553

SMALL GLASS POCKET TUMBLER WITH WHITE TRAILING

Posted in Uncategorized by Allaire Collection of Glass on June 18, 2019

30E Small Glass Pocket Tumbler with White Trailing

30E Small Glass Pocket Tumbler with White Trailing

 This tumbler is a golden honey color with thin white trailing. This piece is unusual because of its color, type of trailing and its small size.  A glass pocket tumbler was carried by a traveler in a pouch or pocket and used for drinking.  Its shape is that of a rectangle with rounded corners or a “stadium”.  A large number of pocket tumblers were made in Spain from the early-17th though the late-18th century.  The origin of the piece could be Spain, or Germany.  No close parallels could be found.  If anyone knows of one please let us know.

H: 7.3 cm

18th Century

%d bloggers like this: